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1.
J Am Dent Assoc ; 152(7): 526-534, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1237577

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Dental trainees (dental students, graduate students, and postdoctoral residents) are at increased risk of experiencing poor mental health, which can lead to intentions to leave their program, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The authors invited 355 dental trainees at the University of Washington School of Dentistry to complete an 83-item questionnaire in August and September 2020. The outcome analyzed was intention to leave their programs. There were 4 self-reported predictors: anxiety, burnout, depression, and COVID-19 impact on overall mental health. The authors ran multiple variable logistic regression models to evaluate relationships between each predictor and outcome (α = .05) and reported odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs. RESULTS: The survey response rate was 35.5%. Overall, 12.7% of participants reported any intention to leave. In total, 22.2% and 16.7% of participants endorsed clinically significant anxiety or depression symptomatology, respectively; 28.6% reported 1 or more burnout symptoms; and 69.0% reported that COVID-19 affected their overall mental health. Participants reporting anxiety (OR, 8.87; 95% CI, 1.80 to 43.57; P = .007), depression (OR, 11.18; 95% CI, 1.84 to 67.74; P = .009), or burnout (OR, 8.14; 95% CI, 1.73 to 38.23; P = .008) were significantly more likely to report intention to leave than those not reporting mental health problems. All participants reporting that the COVID-19 pandemic impacted their mental health expressed intention to leave. CONCLUSIONS: Poor mental health is common among dental trainees and is associated with intention to leave their program. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: COVID-19 has exacerbated the prevalence and consequences of poor mental health among dental students, highlighting the importance of providing wellness resources.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Anxiety/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Intention , Mental Health , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological
2.
J Indian Soc Pedod Prev Dent ; 39(1): 22-28, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1197594

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE: The impact of COVID-19 has affected billions of people affecting nearly all domains of life, including patient's healthcare needs. Due to constrained dental services during lockdown, pediatric dental needs were severely compromised therefore, parental attitude and practices of maintaining child's oral hygiene impose significant impact on child's oral hygiene. AIM: This study aims to assess the attitude and practices of parents toward their children's oral health care during COVID-19 pandemic. METHODOLOGY: The present cross-sectional study was conducted with a sample of 120 parents selected randomly from the outpatient department after obtaining informed consent. A structured questionnaire was used to assess attitude and practice of parents toward their child's oral hygiene during lockdown in COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: The overall attitude and practice score of parents in maintaining their child's oral hygiene was low, with mean value of 2.36 ± 1.36 and 2.51 ± 1.50, respectively. 60.8% of parents reported the need of dental treatment for their child during the lockdown period whereas 50.8% parents contacted the dentist during this period; majority (37.5%) of which reported due to toothache. 68.3% of parents would like to visit nearby dental hospital for emergencies during lockdown period. Only 33.3% of parents took extra efforts to maintain their child's oral hygiene while 45% made dietary changes in their child's diet to prevent tooth decay. CONCLUSION: The overall attitude and practices of the parents were poor toward the oral health of their children during the lockdown period in COVID-19 pandemic. There is urgent need of increasing awareness among parents regarding the importance of maintaining their child's oral health. The inability to see the doctor should at least encourage better home practice measures for future. The concept of tele-dentistry is very new and will be the need of the coming modern times.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Attitude to Health , Child , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Oral Health , Parents , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
HEC Forum ; 33(1-2): 157-164, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1030730

ABSTRACT

Oral health is a critical part of overall health. The current COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the importance of oral health. In this article, we describe how dental practice has been impacted by COVID-19, identify the public health response to COVID-19, and explain the gradual resumption of dental care after the initial disruption due to the pandemic. Finally, we discuss how long-standing health disparities in oral health have been exacerbated by the current pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care/ethics , Ethics, Dental , Health Services Accessibility/ethics , Healthcare Disparities/ethics , Oral Health/ethics , Humans , Pandemics , Public Health/ethics , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Heliyon ; 6(12): e05612, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-965360

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the quality of Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG) related to the management of paediatric dental emergencies applicable to the COVID-19 pandemic, through the use of the measuring instrument AGREE II (Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation in Europe). SOURCES AND DATA COLLECTION: A rigurous online search of CPG was accomplished among the main CPG compilers: National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), National Guideline Clearinghouse, Agency for Healthcare, Research and Quality (AHRQ), Andalusian Health Technology Assessment Department (AETSA), American Academy of Family Physicians, Tripdatabase. Furthermore, because of the need to identify CPG that meet the inclusion criteria, a manual search, among the main national and international dental organizations as well as recognized web sites, was also accomplished. SELECTION OF RESEARCH STUDIES: All of the guides focused on paediatric dental emergencies, available in the database and "gray" literature, and published between 2000 and 2020 (applicable to COVID-19 pandemic) were included without any language restrictions. The CPG that did not contain the full paper or were addressed to adults or children with special needs, were excluded from the selection. The evaluation of the CPG, independently included, were achieved by four (04) experts by using AGREE II. RESULTS: Five (05) out of twenty-three (23) selected CPG, were classified as "acceptable" according to AGREE II. These five guides were evaluated to determine their "Recommendation degree". Only one (01) CPG "Guía Clínica AUGE de Urgencias Odontológicas Ambulatorias-Chile, 2011" reached a score of 75%, the highest among the other guides (5 domains with a score ≥ 60%, including the domain III "Rigour of Development") to be considered as a "highly recommended" CPG. CONCLUSIONS: According to the quality assessment and recommendation degrees criteria from AGREE II, high, middle and low quality CPG were identified. Only one CPG reached a score of 75%, to be classified as "highly recommended". Therefore, it is suggested that the existing CPG updates and future CPG use the available tools and methodologies during their elaboration, in order to guarantee their quality. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: High quality CPG for the management of dental emergencies are designed to support dental health professionals in decision-making to adopt specific dental procedures in the current COVID-19 pandemic. As a matter of fact, these CPG might contribute to reduce the risk of transmission, in case of fresh outbreak of the illness. Likewise, they might help to determine which cases warrant medical attention in centres with special facilities for COVID-19.

5.
J Clin Exp Dent ; 12(12): e1183-e1188, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-962448

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In March 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the COVID-19 pandemic and, a few days later, the Spanish Government declared a State of Emergency and the population lockdown. This crisis situation crisis forced deep changes in health care. At dental care level, it became necessary for both public health services and private consultations to plan changes to enable them to face this healthcare challenge. MATERIAL AND METHODS: SESPO and the General Council of Dentists of Spain (CGDE) appointed a Working Group to prepare a protocol for dental clinics after the lockdown stage. Continuing with this teamwork task, a series of recommendations addressed to public health managers and the dental workforce were agreed, according to the COVID-19 protection protocols, with the evidence available at the time of their preparation. RESULTS: The SESPO Working Group prepared a schedule with recommendations to be taken. The CGDE presented this document to the Ministry of Health, Consumption and Social Welfare, and SESPO emailed it to all the Health Councils of the autonomous regions. The document was also uploaded to the CGDE and SESPO websites and was emailed to all SESPO associated members. CONCLUSIONS: Keeping in mind the existing territorial variation, both at the organization level of dental public health services, and at the care level (especially in child preventive programs and care for pregnant women), this health crisis has highlighted the importance of teamwork. It is necessary to unify the standards for all dental health care units in the national territory in challenging times. Key words:COVID-19, Dental public health, dental care, dentistry, primary care, infection, SARS-CoV-2.

6.
3 Biotech ; 11(1): 1, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-947075

ABSTRACT

The new viral pandemic of COVID-19 is caused by a novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) that has brought the world at another unprecedented crisis in terms of health and economy. The lack of specific therapeutics necessitates other strategies to prevent the spread of infection caused by this previously unknown viral etiological agent. Recent pieces of evidence have shown an association between COVID-19 disease and intestinal dysbiosis. Probiotics comprise living microbes that upon oral administration benefit human health by reshaping the composition of gut microbiota. The close kinship of the gastrointestinal and respiratory tract suggests why the dysfunction of one may incite illness in others. The emerging studies suggest the capability of probiotics to regulate immune responses in the respiratory system. The efficacy of probiotics has been studied previously on several respiratory tract viral infections. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to comprehend existing information on the gut mediated-pulmonary immunity conferred by probiotic bacteria, in the course of respiratory virus infections and administration as a prophylactic measure in COVID-19 pandemic in managing intestinal dysbiosis as well.

9.
Int Arch Otorhinolaryngol ; 24(3): e351-e358, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-695923

ABSTRACT

Introduction Coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) is potentially the greatest global public health crisis of this century. This disease emerged as an outbreak of pneumonia of unknown cause in Wuhan, the capital city of the Hubei province in China, in December 2019. Otolaryngologists, head and neck surgeons and dentists are at an increased risk of occupational disease. Objective The present review summarizes currently published evidence of Covid-19 epidemiology, clinical characteristics, treatment and prevention. No proven effective treatments for this disease currently exist. Data Synthesis COVID-19 started from a zoonotic transmission event associated with a large seafood market that also traded in live wild animals, and it soon became clear that efficient person-to-person transmission was also occurring. Symptoms are varied, and not all patients develop all of them. Conclusion Social distancing seems to have been successful in several places in the world. However, this recommendation alone is not enough to contain the disease, and it is not a long-term solution. Large-scale testing by health professionals of representative samples of the population may give an estimate of the progression of the disease. Different treatments are under test and bring hope of a cure to the population. However, no current treatments (April 27, 2020) have been proven to be the key to success in the treatment of patients with COVID-19. Planetary health is a useful concept to understand the current drivers of this pandemic and to draw a roadmap for science and healthcare that may guide actions to fight economic depression and ensure a healthy recovery.

10.
Br Dent J ; 228(12): 971-975, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-614897

ABSTRACT

On 30 January 2020, the World Health Organisation identified COVID-19, caused by the virus SARS-CoV-2, to be a global emergency. The risk factors already identified for developing complications from a COVID-19 infection are age, gender and comorbidities such as diabetes, hypertension, obesity and cardiovascular disease. These risk factors, however, do not account for the other 52% of deaths arising from COVID-19 in often seemingly healthy individuals. This paper investigates the potential link between SARS-CoV-2 and bacterial load, questioning whether bacteria may play a role in bacterial superinfections and complications such as pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome and sepsis. The connection between COVID-19 complications and oral health and periodontal disease is also examined, as the comorbidities at highest risk of COVID-19 complications also cause imbalances in the oral microbiome and increase the risk of periodontal disease. We explore the connection between high bacterial load in the mouth and post-viral complications, and how improving oral health may reduce the risk of complications from COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections , Humans , Oral Hygiene , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Int J Infect Dis ; 97: 326-328, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-591793

ABSTRACT

Some oral manifestations have been observed in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, there is still a question about whether these lesions are due to coronavirus infection or secondary manifestations resulting from the patient's systemic condition. Thus, this article aims to report an additional case of an oral condition in a patient diagnosed with COVID-19. Our patient, a sixty-seven-year-old Caucasian man, tested positive to coronavirus and presented oral manifestations such as recurrent herpes simplex, candidiasis, and geographic tongue. We support the argument that some oral conditions could be secondary to the deterioration of systemic health or due to treatments for COVID-19. The present case report highlights the importance of including dentists in the intensive care unit multi-professional team to improve oral health in critical patients, not only COVID-19 patients, but also, to contribute to evidence-based and decision-making in managing infectious diseases.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Mouth Mucosa/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Aged , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Humans , Male , Mouth Mucosa/virology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
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