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1.
Gut ; 69(6): 997-1001, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1723830

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To study the GI symptoms in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infected patients. DESIGN: We analysed epidemiological, demographic, clinical and laboratory data of 95 cases with SARS-CoV-2 caused coronavirus disease 2019. Real-time reverse transcriptase PCR was used to detect the presence of SARS-CoV-2 in faeces and GI tissues. RESULTS: Among the 95 patients, 58 cases exhibited GI symptoms of which 11 (11.6%) occurred on admission and 47 (49.5%) developed during hospitalisation. Diarrhoea (24.2%), anorexia (17.9%) and nausea (17.9%) were the main symptoms with five (5.3%), five (5.3%) and three (3.2%) cases occurred on the illness onset, respectively. A substantial proportion of patients developed diarrhoea during hospitalisation, potentially aggravated by various drugs including antibiotics. Faecal samples of 65 hospitalised patients were tested for the presence of SARS-CoV-2, including 42 with and 23 without GI symptoms, of which 22 (52.4%) and 9 (39.1%) were positive, respectively. Six patients with GI symptoms were subjected to endoscopy, revealing oesophageal bleeding with erosions and ulcers in one severe patient. SARS-CoV-2 RNA was detected in oesophagus, stomach, duodenum and rectum specimens for both two severe patients. In contrast, only duodenum was positive in one of the four non-severe patients. CONCLUSIONS: GI tract may be a potential transmission route and target organ of SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Gastrointestinal Tract , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Adult , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Female , Gastrointestinal Tract/physiopathology , Gastrointestinal Tract/virology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Viral Immunol ; 34(6): 416-420, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1475758

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which has infected millions of individuals in the world. However, the long-term effect of SARS-CoV-2 on the organs of recovered patients remains unclear. This study is to evaluate the impact of SARS-CoV-2 on the spleen and T lymphocytes. Seventy-six patients recovered from COVID-19, including 66 cases of moderate pneumonia and 10 cases of severe pneumonia were enrolled in the observation group. The control group consisted of 55 age-matched healthy subjects. The thickness and length of spleen were measured by using B-ultrasound and the levels of T lymphocytes were detected by flow cytometry. Results showed that the mean length of spleen in the observation group was 89.57 ± 11.49 mm, which was significantly reduced compared with that in the control group (103.82 ± 11.29 mm, p < 0.001). The mean thicknesses of spleen between observation group and control group were 29.97 ± 4.04 mm and 32.45 ± 4.49 mm, respectively, and the difference was significant (p < 0.001). However, no significant difference was observed in the size of spleen between common pneumonia and severe pneumonia (p > 0.05). In addition, the decreased count of T lymphocyte was observed in part of recovered patients. The counts of T suppressor lymphocytes in patients with severe pneumonia were significantly decreased compared with those with moderate pneumonia (p = 0.005). Therefore, these data indicate that SARS-CoV-2 infection affects the size of spleen and T lymphocytes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Spleen/pathology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Young Adult
3.
Front Pharmacol ; 11: 579330, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389228

ABSTRACT

The Syrian golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) has recently been demonstrated as a clinically relevant animal model for SARS-CoV-2 infection. However, lack of knowledge about the tissue-specific expression pattern of various proteins in these animals and the unavailability of reagents like antibodies against this species hampers these models' optimal use. The major objective of our current study was to analyze the tissue-specific expression pattern of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2, a proven functional receptor for SARS-CoV-2 in different organs of the hamster. Using two different antibodies (MA5-32307 and AF933), we have conducted immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence analysis to evaluate the ACE2 expression in different tissues of the hamster. Further, at the mRNA level, the expression of Ace2 in tissues was evaluated through RT-qPCR analysis. Both the antibodies detected expression of ACE2 in kidney, small intestine, tongue, and liver. Epithelium of proximal tubules of kidney and surface epithelium of ileum expresses a very high amount of this protein. Surprisingly, analysis of stained tissue sections showed no detectable expression of ACE2 in the lung or tracheal epithelial cells. Similarly, all parts of the large intestine were negative for ACE2 expression. Analysis of tissues from different age groups and sex didn't show any obvious difference in ACE2 expression pattern or level. Together, our findings corroborate some of the earlier reports related to ACE2 expression patterns in human tissues and contradict others. We believe that this study's findings have provided evidence that demands further investigation to understand the predominant respiratory pathology of SARS-CoV-2 infection and disease.

4.
Future Microbiol ; 16: 107-118, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389067

ABSTRACT

Viruses have caused the death of millions of people worldwide. Specifically, human viruses are grouped into 21 families, including the family of coronaviruses (CoVs). In December 2019, in Wuhan, China, a new human CoV was identified, SARS-CoV-2. The first step of the infection mechanism of the SARS-CoV-2 in the human host is adhesion, which occurs through the S glycoprotein that is found in diverse human organs. Another way through which SARS-CoV-2 could possibly attach to the host's cells is by means of the histo-blood group antigens. In this work, we have reviewed the mechanisms by which some viruses bind to the histo-blood group antigens, which could be related to the susceptibility of the individual and are dependent on the histo-blood group.


Subject(s)
Blood Group Antigens/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Virus Attachment , Animals , Chiroptera/virology , Coronavirus Envelope Proteins/metabolism , Disease Susceptibility/blood , Genome, Viral/genetics , Glycoproteins/metabolism , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
5.
Cell Res ; 31(8): 847-860, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387284

ABSTRACT

Cytokine storm and multi-organ failure are the main causes of SARS-CoV-2-related death. However, the origin of excessive damages caused by SARS-CoV-2 remains largely unknown. Here we show that the SARS-CoV-2 envelope (2-E) protein alone is able to cause acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)-like damages in vitro and in vivo. 2-E proteins were found to form a type of pH-sensitive cation channels in bilayer lipid membranes. As observed in SARS-CoV-2-infected cells, heterologous expression of 2-E channels induced rapid cell death in various susceptible cell types and robust secretion of cytokines and chemokines in macrophages. Intravenous administration of purified 2-E protein into mice caused ARDS-like pathological damages in lung and spleen. A dominant negative mutation lowering 2-E channel activity attenuated cell death and SARS-CoV-2 production. Newly identified channel inhibitors exhibited potent anti-SARS-CoV-2 activity and excellent cell protective activity in vitro and these activities were positively correlated with inhibition of 2-E channel. Importantly, prophylactic and therapeutic administration of the channel inhibitor effectively reduced both the viral load and secretion of inflammation cytokines in lungs of SARS-CoV-2-infected transgenic mice expressing human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (hACE-2). Our study supports that 2-E is a promising drug target against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Coronavirus Envelope Proteins/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Apoptosis , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus Envelope Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Coronavirus Envelope Proteins/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Half-Life , Humans , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Transgenic , Mutagenesis, Site-Directed , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spleen/metabolism , Spleen/pathology , Viral Load , Virulence
6.
Cell Metab ; 32(6): 1028-1040.e4, 2020 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1310646

ABSTRACT

Isolated reports of new-onset diabetes in individuals with COVID-19 have led to the hypothesis that SARS-CoV-2 is directly cytotoxic to pancreatic islet ß cells. This would require binding and entry of SARS-CoV-2 into ß cells via co-expression of its canonical cell entry factors, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and transmembrane serine protease 2 (TMPRSS2); however, their expression in human pancreas has not been clearly defined. We analyzed six transcriptional datasets of primary human islet cells and found that ACE2 and TMPRSS2 were not co-expressed in single ß cells. In pancreatic sections, ACE2 and TMPRSS2 protein was not detected in ß cells from donors with and without diabetes. Instead, ACE2 protein was expressed in islet and exocrine tissue microvasculature and in a subset of pancreatic ducts, whereas TMPRSS2 protein was restricted to ductal cells. These findings reduce the likelihood that SARS-CoV-2 directly infects ß cells in vivo through ACE2 and TMPRSS2.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Virus Internalization , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/analysis , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Animals , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/genetics , Cells, Cultured , Diabetes Complications/genetics , Diabetes Complications/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus/genetics , Gene Expression , Humans , Insulin-Secreting Cells/metabolism , Mice , Microvessels/metabolism , Pancreas/metabolism , RNA, Messenger/analysis , RNA, Messenger/genetics , Serine Endopeptidases/analysis , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics
7.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(1): 68-75, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1292116

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has spread worldwide and has the ability to damage multiple organs. However, information on serum SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid (RNAemia) in patients affected by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is limited. METHODS: Patients who were admitted to Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 were tested for SARS-COV-2 RNA in serum from 28 January 2020 to 9 February 2020. Demographic data, laboratory and radiological findings, comorbidities, and outcomes data were collected and analyzed. RESULTS: Eighty-five patients were included in the analysis. The viral load of throat swabs was significantly higher than of serum samples. The highest detection of SARS-CoV-2 RNA in serum samples was between 11 and 15 days after symptom onset. Analysis to compare patients with and without RNAemia provided evidence that computed tomography and some laboratory biomarkers (total protein, blood urea nitrogen, lactate dehydrogenase, hypersensitive troponin I, and D-dimer) were abnormal and that the extent of these abnormalities was generally higher in patients with RNAemia than in patients without RNAemia. Organ damage (respiratory failure, cardiac damage, renal damage, and coagulopathy) was more common in patients with RNAemia than in patients without RNAemia. Patients with vs without RNAemia had shorter durations from serum testing SARS-CoV-2 RNA. The mortality rate was higher among patients with vs without RNAemia. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, we provide evidence to support that SARS-CoV-2 may have an important role in multiple organ damage. Our evidence suggests that RNAemia has a significant association with higher risk of in-hospital mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nucleic Acids , Cohort Studies , Humans , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Cell Res ; 31(8): 836-846, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275907

ABSTRACT

Severe COVID-19 disease caused by SARS-CoV-2 is frequently accompanied by dysfunction of the lungs and extrapulmonary organs. However, the organotropism of SARS-CoV-2 and the port of virus entry for systemic dissemination remain largely unknown. We profiled 26 COVID-19 autopsy cases from four cohorts in Wuhan, China, and determined the systemic distribution of SARS-CoV-2. SARS-CoV-2 was detected in the lungs and multiple extrapulmonary organs of critically ill COVID-19 patients up to 67 days after symptom onset. Based on organotropism and pathological features of the patients, COVID-19 was divided into viral intrapulmonary and systemic subtypes. In patients with systemic viral distribution, SARS-CoV-2 was detected in monocytes, macrophages, and vascular endothelia at blood-air barrier, blood-testis barrier, and filtration barrier. Critically ill patients with long disease duration showed decreased pulmonary cell proliferation, reduced viral RNA, and marked fibrosis in the lungs. Permanent SARS-CoV-2 presence and tissue injuries in the lungs and extrapulmonary organs suggest direct viral invasion as a mechanism of pathogenicity in critically ill patients. SARS-CoV-2 may hijack monocytes, macrophages, and vascular endothelia at physiological barriers as the ports of entry for systemic dissemination. Our study thus delineates systemic pathological features of SARS-CoV-2 infection, which sheds light on the development of novel COVID-19 treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Lung/virology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Autopsy , COVID-19/virology , China , Cohort Studies , Critical Illness , Female , Fibrosis , Hospitalization , Humans , Kidney/pathology , Kidney/virology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/pathology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/virology , Lung/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spleen/pathology , Spleen/virology , Trachea/pathology , Trachea/virology
9.
Cell Res ; 31(8): 847-860, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1265947

ABSTRACT

Cytokine storm and multi-organ failure are the main causes of SARS-CoV-2-related death. However, the origin of excessive damages caused by SARS-CoV-2 remains largely unknown. Here we show that the SARS-CoV-2 envelope (2-E) protein alone is able to cause acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)-like damages in vitro and in vivo. 2-E proteins were found to form a type of pH-sensitive cation channels in bilayer lipid membranes. As observed in SARS-CoV-2-infected cells, heterologous expression of 2-E channels induced rapid cell death in various susceptible cell types and robust secretion of cytokines and chemokines in macrophages. Intravenous administration of purified 2-E protein into mice caused ARDS-like pathological damages in lung and spleen. A dominant negative mutation lowering 2-E channel activity attenuated cell death and SARS-CoV-2 production. Newly identified channel inhibitors exhibited potent anti-SARS-CoV-2 activity and excellent cell protective activity in vitro and these activities were positively correlated with inhibition of 2-E channel. Importantly, prophylactic and therapeutic administration of the channel inhibitor effectively reduced both the viral load and secretion of inflammation cytokines in lungs of SARS-CoV-2-infected transgenic mice expressing human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (hACE-2). Our study supports that 2-E is a promising drug target against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Coronavirus Envelope Proteins/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Apoptosis , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus Envelope Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Coronavirus Envelope Proteins/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Half-Life , Humans , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Transgenic , Mutagenesis, Site-Directed , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spleen/metabolism , Spleen/pathology , Viral Load , Virulence
10.
Mol Biol Rep ; 48(5): 4667-4675, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1237535

ABSTRACT

The transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2) is a membrane anchored protease that primarily expressed by epithelial cells of respiratory and gastrointestinal systems and has been linked to multiple pathological processes in humans including tumor growth, metastasis and viral infections. Recent studies have shown that TMPRSS2 expressed on cell surface of host cells could play a crucial role in activation of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) spike protein which facilitates the rapid early entry of the virus into host cells. In addition, direct suppression of TMPRSS2 using small drug inhibitors has been demonstrated to be effective in decreasing SARS-CoV-2 infection in vitro, which presents TMPRSS2 protease as a potential therapeutic strategy for SARS-CoV-2 infection. Recently, SARS-CoV-2 has been shown to be capable of infecting gastrointestinal enterocytes and to provoke gastrointestinal disorders in patients with COVID-19 disease, which is considered as a new transmission route and target organ of SARS-CoV-2. In this review, we highlight the biochemical properties of TMPRSS2 protease and discuss the potential targeting of TMPRSS2 by inhibitors to prevent the SARS-CoV-2 spreading through gastro-intestinal tract system as well as the hurdles that need to be overcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Enterocytes/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Serine Proteinase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Enterocytes/metabolism , Enterocytes/virology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Small Molecule Libraries/pharmacology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Virus Internalization/drug effects
11.
Pathologe ; 42(2): 183-187, 2021 Mar.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1235727

ABSTRACT

Apart from pulmonary disease, acute kidney injury (AKI) is one of the most frequent and most severe organ complications in severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The SARS-CoV­2 virus has been detected in renal tissue. Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) before and on dialysis and specifically renal transplant patients represent a particularly vulnerable population. The increasing number of COVID-19 infected patients with renal involvement led to an evolving interest in the analysis of its pathophysiology, morphology and modes of virus detection in the kidney. Meanwhile, there are ample data from several autopsy and kidney biopsy studies that differ in the quantity of cases as well as in their quality. While the detection of SARS-CoV­2 RNA in the kidney leads to reproducible results, the use of electron microscopy for visualisation of the virus is difficult and currently critically discussed due to various artefacts. The exact contribution of indirect or direct effects on the kidney in COVID-19 are not yet known and are currently the focus of intensive research.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , COVID-19 , Humans , Kidney , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Brain Behav Immun ; 97: 13-21, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1233366

ABSTRACT

SARS-Cov-2 infection is frequently associated with Nervous System manifestations. However, it is not clear how SARS-CoV-2 can cause neurological dysfunctions and which molecular processes are affected in the brain. In this work, we examined the frontal cortex tissue of patients who died of COVID-19 for the presence of SARS-CoV-2, comparing qRT-PCR with ddPCR. We also investigated the transcriptomic profile of frontal cortex from COVID-19 patients and matched controls by RNA-seq analysis to characterize the transcriptional signature. Our data showed that SARS-CoV-2 could be detected by ddPCR in 8 (88%) of 9 examined samples while by qRT-PCR in one case only (11%). Transcriptomic analysis revealed that 11 genes (10 mRNAs and 1 lncRNA) were differential expressed when frontal cortex of COVID-19 patients were compared to controls. These genes fall into categories including hypoxia, hemoglobin-stabilizing protein, hydrogen peroxide processes. This work demonstrated that the quantity of viral RNA in frontal cortex is minimal and it can be detected only with a very sensitive method (ddPCR). Thus, it is likely that SARS-CoV-2 does not actively infect and replicate in the brain; its topography within encephalic structures remains uncertain. Moreover, COVID-19 may have a role on brain gene expression, since we observed an important downregulation of genes associated to hypoxia inducting factor system (HIF) that may inhibit the capacity of defense system during infection and oxigen deprivation, showing that hypoxia, well known multi organ condition associated to COVID-19, also marked the brain.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Frontal Lobe , Humans , Transcriptome , Whole Exome Sequencing
13.
Microb Biotechnol ; 14(4): 1627-1641, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1228701

ABSTRACT

Virus detection methods are important to cope with the SARS-CoV-2 pandemics. Apart from the lung, SARS-CoV-2 was detected in multiple organs in severe cases. Less is known on organ tropism in patients developing mild or no symptoms, and some of such patients might be missed in symptom-indicated swab testing. Here, we tested and validated several approaches and selected the most reliable RT-PCR protocol for the detection of SARS-CoV-2 RNA in patients' routine diagnostic formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) specimens available in pathology, to assess (i) organ tropism in samples from COVID-19-positive patients, (ii) unrecognized cases in selected tissues from negative or not-tested patients during a pandemic peak, and (iii) retrospectively, pre-pandemic lung samples. We identified SARS-CoV-2 RNA in seven samples from confirmed COVID-19 patients, in two gastric biopsies, one small bowel and one colon resection, one lung biopsy, one pleural resection and one pleural effusion specimen, while all other specimens were negative. In the pandemic peak cohort, we identified one previously unrecognized COVID-19 case in tonsillectomy samples. All pre-pandemic lung samples were negative. In conclusion, SARS-CoV-2 RNA detection in FFPE pathology specimens can potentially improve surveillance of COVID-19, allow retrospective studies, and advance our understanding of SARS-CoV-2 organ tropism and effects.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , RNA, Viral/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/diagnosis , Diagnostic Tests, Routine , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies
14.
Nan Fang Yi Ke Da Xue Xue Bao ; 41(4): 628-632, 2021 Apr 20.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219329

ABSTRACT

The high comorbidity between cardiovascular and metabolic diseases (CVMD) and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and the consequent high mortality and the potential risk of cardiovascular damage have brought great challenges to the clinical diagnosis and treatment of the condition. The latest studies found that advanced age, immune function defects, inflammatory factor storms and oxidative stress damage all potentially contribute to the high comorbidity of the two. Direct virus invasion, myocardial oxygen supply and demand imbalance and vascular endothelial and coagulation dysfunction may be important mechanisms for cardiovascular injury in COVID-19 patients. In addition, the expression level of ACE2 (the cell membrane receptor of SARS-CoV-2) in various organs and the peripheral blood not only mediates the direct invasion and damage of the organs, but also participates in regulation of the balance of systematic inflammation and oxidative stress, thus affecting the susceptibility and outcomes of the patients. Herein we review the recent research progress in the comorbidity between COVID-19 and CVMD and explore the mechanisms of cardiovascular damage caused by SARS-CoV-2, thus to provide a theoretical basis for the clinical diagnosis and treatment of COVID-19 with underlying CVMD.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Metabolic Diseases , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Humans , Metabolic Diseases/complications , Metabolic Diseases/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
15.
J Infect Public Health ; 14(7): 938-946, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1213376

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak in December 2019 in Wuhan, China, the virus has infected more than 153 million individuals across the world due to its human-to-human transmission. The USA is the most affected country having more than 32-million cases till date. Sudden high fever, pneumonia and organ failure have been observed in infected individuals. OBJECTIVES: In the current situation of emerging viral disease, there is no specific vaccine, or any therapeutics available for SARS-CoV-2, thus there is a dire need to design a potential vaccine to combat the virus by developing immunity in the population. The purpose of present study was to develop a potential vaccine by targeting B and T-cell epitopes using bioinformatics approaches. METHODS: B- and T-cell epitopes are predicted from novel M protein-SARS-CoV-2 for the development of a unique multiple epitope vaccine by applying bioinformatics approaches. These epitopes were analyzed and selected for their immunogenicity, antigenicity scores, and toxicity in correspondence to their ability to trigger immune response. In combination to epitopes, best multi-epitope of potential immunogenic property was constructed. The epitopes were joined using EAAAK, AAY and GPGPG linkers. RESULTS: The constructed vaccine showed good results of worldwide population coverage and promising immune response. This constructed vaccine was subjected to in-silico immune simulations by C-ImmSim. Chimeric protein construct was cloned into PET28a (+) vector for expression study in Escherichia coli using snapgene. CONCLUSION: This vaccine design proved effective in various computer-based immune response analysis as well as showed good population coverage. This study is solely dependent on developing M protein-based vaccine, and these in silico findings would be a breakthrough in the development of an effective vaccine to eradicate SARS-CoV-2 globally.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , China , Computational Biology , Epitopes, B-Lymphocyte , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
16.
PLoS One ; 16(4): e0250708, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1206200

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is the pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2 that has caused more than 2.2 million deaths worldwide. We summarize the reported pathologic findings on biopsy and autopsy in patients with severe/fatal COVID-19 and documented the presence and/or effect of SARS-CoV-2 in all organs. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A systematic search of the PubMed, Embase, MedRxiv, Lilacs and Epistemonikos databases from January to August 2020 for all case reports and case series that reported histopathologic findings of COVID-19 infection at autopsy or tissue biopsy was performed. 603 COVID-19 cases from 75 of 451 screened studies met inclusion criteria. The most common pathologic findings were lungs: diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) (92%) and superimposed acute bronchopneumonia (27%); liver: hepatitis (21%), heart: myocarditis (11.4%). Vasculitis was common only in skin biopsies (25%). Microthrombi were described in the placenta (57.9%), lung (38%), kidney (20%), Central Nervous System (CNS) (18%), and gastrointestinal (GI) tract (2%). Injury of endothelial cells was common in the lung (18%) and heart (4%). Hemodynamic changes such as necrosis due to hypoxia/hypoperfusion, edema and congestion were common in kidney (53%), liver (48%), CNS (31%) and GI tract (18%). SARS-CoV-2 viral particles were demonstrated within organ-specific cells in the trachea, lung, liver, large intestine, kidney, CNS either by electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, or immunohistochemistry. Additional tissues were positive by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) tests only. The included studies were from numerous countries, some were not peer reviewed, and some studies were performed by subspecialists, resulting in variable and inconsistent reporting or over statement of the reported findings. CONCLUSIONS: The main pathologic findings of severe/fatal COVID-19 infection are DAD, changes related to coagulopathy and/or hemodynamic compromise. In addition, according to the observed organ damage myocarditis may be associated with sequelae.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/physiopathology , Autopsy/methods , Biopsy/methods , Central Nervous System/virology , Endothelial Cells/virology , Female , Gastrointestinal Tract/virology , Heart/virology , Humans , Kidney/virology , Liver/virology , Lung/virology , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Placenta/virology , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Staining and Labeling/methods , Trachea/virology
17.
Mol Syst Biol ; 17(4): e10232, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1204403

ABSTRACT

Exacerbated pro-inflammatory immune response contributes to COVID-19 pathology. However, despite the mounting evidence about SARS-CoV-2 infecting the human gut, little is known about the antiviral programs triggered in this organ. To address this gap, we performed single-cell transcriptomics of SARS-CoV-2-infected intestinal organoids. We identified a subpopulation of enterocytes as the prime target of SARS-CoV-2 and, interestingly, found the lack of positive correlation between susceptibility to infection and the expression of ACE2. Infected cells activated strong pro-inflammatory programs and produced interferon, while expression of interferon-stimulated genes was limited to bystander cells due to SARS-CoV-2 suppressing the autocrine action of interferon. These findings reveal that SARS-CoV-2 curtails the immune response and highlights the gut as a pro-inflammatory reservoir that should be considered to fully understand SARS-CoV-2 pathogenesis.


Subject(s)
Intestines/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Single-Cell Analysis , COVID-19/virology , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Humans , In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence , Organoids/metabolism , Sequence Analysis, RNA
18.
EClinicalMedicine ; 35: 100850, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1201119

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 in children is usually mild or asymptomatic, but severe and fatal paediatric cases have been described. The pathology of COVID-19 in children is not known; the proposed pathogenesis for severe cases includes immune-mediated mechanisms or the direct effect of SARS-CoV-2 on tissues. We describe the autopsy findings in five cases of paediatric COVID-19 and provide mechanistic insight into the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. METHODS: Children and adolescents who died with COVID-19 between March 18 and August 15, 2020 were autopsied with a minimally invasive method. Tissue samples from all vital organs were analysed by histology, electron microscopy (EM), reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). FINDINGS: Five patients were included, one male and four female, aged 7 months to 15 years. Two patients had severe diseases before SARS-CoV-2 infection: adrenal carcinoma and Edwards syndrome. Three patients were previously healthy and had multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) with distinct clinical presentations: myocarditis, colitis, and acute encephalopathy with status epilepticus. Autopsy findings varied amongst patients and included mild to severe COVID-19 pneumonia, pulmonary microthrombosis, cerebral oedema with reactive gliosis, myocarditis, intestinal inflammation, and haemophagocytosis. SARS-CoV-2 was detected in all patients in lungs, heart and kidneys by at least one method (RT-PCR, IHC or EM), and in endothelial cells from heart and brain in two patients with MIS-C (IHC). In addition, we show for the first time the presence of SARS-CoV-2 in the brain tissue of a child with MIS-C with acute encephalopathy, and in the intestinal tissue of a child with acute colitis. Interpretation: SARS-CoV-2 can infect several cell and tissue types in paediatric patients, and the target organ for the clinical manifestation varies amongst individuals. Two major patterns of severe COVID-19 were observed: a primarily pulmonary disease, with severe acute respiratory disease and diffuse alveolar damage, or a multisystem inflammatory syndrome with the involvement of several organs. The presence of SARS-CoV-2 in several organs, associated with cellular ultrastructural changes, reinforces the hypothesis that a direct effect of SARS-CoV-2 on tissues is involved in the pathogenesis of MIS-C. FUNDING: Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo, Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

19.
Hepat Med ; 13: 37-44, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1197452

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The SARS-CoV-2 virus may have direct or indirect effects on other human organs beyond the respiratory system and including the liver, via binding of the spike protein. This study investigated the potential direct interactions with the liver by comparing the binding of SARS-CoV-2 spike proteins to human AT2-like cells, primary human hepatocytes and immortalized hepatocyte-like hybrid cells. Receptors with binding specificity for SARS-CoV-2 spike protein on AT2 cells and hepatocytes were identified. METHODS: The specific binding of biotinylated spike and spike 1 proteins to undifferentiated human E12 MLPC (E12), E12 differentiated alveolar type 2 (AT2) cells, primary human hepatocytes (PHH) and E12 human hepatocyte-like hybrid cells (HLC) was studied by confocal microscopy. We investigated the expression of ACE-2, binding of biotinylated spike protein, biotinylated spike 1 and inhibition of binding by unlabeled spike protein, two neutralizing antibodies and an antibody directed against the hepatocyte asialoglycoprotein receptor 1 (ASGr1). RESULTS: E12 MLPC did not express ACE-2 and did not bind either of spike or spike 1 proteins. AT2-like cells expressed ACE-2 and bound both spike and spike 1. Both PHH and HLC did not express ACE-2 and did not bind spike 1 protein. However, both PHH and HLC actively bound the spike protein. Biotinylated spike protein binding was inhibited by unlabeled spike but not spike 1 protein on PHH and HLC. Two commercial neutralizing antibodies blocked the binding of the spike to PHH and HLC but only one blocked binding to AT2. An antibody to the hepatocyte ASGr1 blocked the binding of the spike protein to PHH and HLC. CONCLUSION: The absence of ACE-2 receptors and inhibition of spike binding by an antibody to the ASGr1 on both PHH and HLC suggested that the spike protein interacts with the ASGr1. The differential antibody blocking of spike binding to AT2, PHH and HLC indicated that neutralizing activity of SARS-CoV-2 binding might involve additional mechanisms beyond RBD binding to ACE-2.

20.
Pharmacol Rep ; 73(3): 712-727, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1195205

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causes pulmonary injury or multiple-organ injury by various pathological pathways. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-ß) is a key factor that is released during SARS-CoV-2 infection. TGF-ß, by internalization of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), suppresses the anti-oxidant system, downregulates the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), and activates the plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) and nuclear factor-kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-kB). These changes cause inflammation and lung injury along with coagulopathy. Moreover, reactive oxygen species play a significant role in lung injury, which levels up during SARS-CoV-2 infection. DRUG SUGGESTION: Pirfenidone is an anti-fibrotic drug with an anti-oxidant activity that can prevent lung injury during SARS-CoV-2 infection by blocking the maturation process of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-ß) and enhancing the protective role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). Pirfenidone is a safe drug for patients with hypertension or diabetes and its side effect tolerated well. CONCLUSION: The drug as a theoretical perspective may be an effective and safe choice for suppressing the inflammatory response during COVID-19. The recommendation would be a combination of pirfenidone and N-acetylcysteine to achieve maximum benefit during SARS-CoV-2 treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , Inflammation/drug therapy , Lung Injury/metabolism , Pyridones/therapeutic use , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Transforming Growth Factor beta/metabolism , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/pharmacology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Inflammation/metabolism , Lung Injury/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
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