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1.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(11): 2055-2064, 2021 12 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561261

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Emerging evidence suggests many people have persistent symptoms after acute coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) illness. Our objective was to estimate the prevalence and correlates of post-acute sequelae of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection (PASC). METHODS: We used a population-based probability survey of adults with COVID-19 in Michigan. Living noninstitutionalized adults aged ≥18 in the Michigan Disease Surveillance System with COVID-19 onset through mid-April 2020 were eligible for selection (N = 28 000). Among 2000 selected, 629 completed the survey between June-December 2020. We estimated PASC prevalence, defined as persistent symptoms ≥30 (30-day COVID-19) or ≥60 (60-day COVID-19) days post-COVID-19 onset, overall and by sociodemographic and clinical factors. We used modified Poisson regression to produce adjusted prevalence ratios (aPRs) for potential risk factors. RESULTS: The analytic sample (n = 593) was predominantly female (56.1%), aged ≥45 years (68.2%), and non-Hispanic White (46.3%) or Black (34.8%). Thirty- and 60-day COVID-19 were highly prevalent (52.5% and 35.0%), even among nonhospitalized respondents (43.7% and 26.9%) and respondents reporting mild symptoms (29.2% and 24.5%). Respondents reporting very severe (vs mild) symptoms had 2.25 times higher prevalence of 30-day COVID-19 (aPR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.46-3.46) and 1.71 times higher prevalence of 60-day COVID-19 (aPR, 1.71; 95% CI: 1.02-2.88). Hospitalized (vs nonhospitalized) respondents had ~40% higher prevalence of both 30-day (aPR, 1.37; 95% CI: 1.12-1.69) and 60-day (aPR, 1.40; 95% CI: 1.02-1.93) COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: PASC is highly prevalent among cases reporting severe initial symptoms and, to a lesser extent, cases reporting mild and moderate symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Disease Progression , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Prevalence
2.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(11): e4058-e4063, 2021 12 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1560027

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Little is known about long-term recovery from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) disease, especially in nonhospitalized individuals. In this longitudinal study we present symptoms registered during the acute phase as well as long COVID (ie, long-lasting COVID-19 symptoms) in patients from the Faroe Islands. METHODS: All consecutive patients with confirmed reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction testing from April to June 2020 were invited to participate in this study for the assessment of long COVID. Demographic and clinical characteristics and self-reported acute and persistent symptoms were assessed using a standardized detailed questionnaire administered at enrollment and at repeated phone interviews in the period 22 April to 16 August. RESULTS: Of the 180 participants (96.3% of the 187 eligible COVID-19 patients), 53.1% reported persistence of at least 1 symptom after a mean of 125 days after symptoms onset, 33.0% reported 1 or 2 symptoms, and 20.1% reported 3 or more symptoms. At the last follow-up, 46.9% were asymptomatic compared with 4.4% during the acute phase. The most prevalent persistent symptoms were fatigue, loss of smell and taste, and arthralgias. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that it might take months for symptoms to resolve, even among nonhospitalized persons with mild illness course in the acute phase. Continued monitoring for long COVID is needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/complications , Fatigue , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , SARS-CoV-2
3.
J Med Virol ; 93(9): 5603-5607, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1363670

ABSTRACT

It has been estimated that individuals with COVID-19 can shed replication-competent virus up to a maximum of 20 days after initiation of symptoms. The majority of studies that addressed this situation involved hospitalized individuals and those with severe disease. Studies to address the possible presence of SARS-CoV-2 during the different phases of COVID-19 disease in mildly infected individuals, and utilization of viral culture techniques to identify replication-competent viruses, have been limited. This report describes two patients with mild forms of the disease who shed replication-competent virus for 24 and 37 days, respectively, after symptom onset.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , Virus Cultivation , Animals , Chlorocebus aethiops , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Vero Cells/ultrastructure , Vero Cells/virology , Viral Load , Virus Shedding
4.
Can J Diabetes ; 45(6): 524-530, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317699

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Patients with diabetes are potentially at higher risk of mortality due to coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). In this study, we aimed to compare the outcomes and severity of pulmonary involvement in COVID-19 patients with and without diabetes. METHODS: In this cohort study, we recruited patients with diabetes who were hospitalized due to COVID-19 during the period from February 2020 to May 2020. Hospitalized individuals without diabetes were enrolled as control subjects. All patients were followed for 90 days and clinical findings and patients' outcomes were reported. RESULTS: Over a period of 4 months, 127 patients with diabetes and 127 individuals without diabetes with a diagnosis of COVID-19 were recruited. Their mean age was 65.70±12.51 years. Mortality was higher in the group with diabetes (22.8% vs 15.0%; p=0.109), although not significantly. More severe pulmonary involvement (p=0.015), extended hospital stay (p<0.001) and greater need for invasive ventilation (p=0.029) were reported in this population. Stepwise logistic regression revealed that diabetes was not independently associated with mortality (p=0.092). Older age (odds ratio [OR], 1.054; p=0.003), aggravated pulmonary involvement on admission (OR, 1.149; p=0.001), presence of comorbidities (OR, 1.290; p=0.020) and hypothyroidism (OR, 6.576; p=0.021) were associated with mortality. Diabetic foot infection had a strong positive correlation with mortality (OR, 49.819; p=0.016), whereas insulin therapy had a negative correlation (OR, 0.242; p=0.045). CONCLUSIONS: The mortality rate due to COVID-19 did not differ significantly between patients with or without diabetes. Older age, macrovascular complications and presence of comorbidities could increase mortality in people with diabetes. Insulin therapy during hospitalization could attenuate the detrimental effects of hyperglycemia and improve prognosis of patients with COVID-19 and diabetes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/mortality , Hospitalization/trends , Respiration Disorders/mortality , Severity of Illness Index , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/therapy , Cohort Studies , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/diagnostic imaging , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/therapy , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality/trends , Respiration Disorders/diagnostic imaging , Respiration Disorders/therapy
5.
PLoS One ; 16(5): e0245031, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1314324

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection causing the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been responsible for more than 2.8 million deaths and nearly 125 million infections worldwide as of March 2021. In March 2020, the World Health Organization determined that the COVID-19 outbreak is a global pandemic. The urgency and magnitude of this pandemic demanded immediate action and coordination between local, regional, national, and international actors. In that mission, researchers require access to high-quality biological materials and data from SARS-CoV-2 infected and uninfected patients, covering the spectrum of disease manifestations. The "Biobanque québécoise de la COVID-19" (BQC19) is a pan-provincial initiative undertaken in Québec, Canada to enable the collection, storage and sharing of samples and data related to the COVID-19 crisis. As a disease-oriented biobank based on high-quality biosamples and clinical data of hospitalized and non-hospitalized SARS-CoV-2 PCR positive and negative individuals. The BQC19 follows a legal and ethical management framework approved by local health authorities. The biosamples include plasma, serum, peripheral blood mononuclear cells and DNA and RNA isolated from whole blood. In addition to the clinical variables, BQC19 will provide in-depth analytical data derived from the biosamples including whole genome and transcriptome sequencing, proteome and metabolome analyses, multiplex measurements of key circulating markers as well as anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody responses. BQC19 will provide the scientific and medical communities access to data and samples to better understand, manage and ultimately limit, the impact of COVID-19. In this paper we present BQC19, describe the process according to which it is governed and organized, and address opportunities for future research collaborations. BQC19 aims to be a part of a global communal effort addressing the challenges of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Biological Specimen Banks/organization & administration , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , Humans , Information Dissemination/methods , Pandemics , Quebec/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
6.
Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci ; 376(1829): 20200274, 2021 07 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1309692

ABSTRACT

The dynamics of immunity are crucial to understanding the long-term patterns of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. Several cases of reinfection with SARS-CoV-2 have been documented 48-142 days after the initial infection and immunity to seasonal circulating coronaviruses is estimated to be shorter than 1 year. Using an age-structured, deterministic model, we explore potential immunity dynamics using contact data from the UK population. In the scenario where immunity to SARS-CoV-2 lasts an average of three months for non-hospitalized individuals, a year for hospitalized individuals, and the effective reproduction number after lockdown ends is 1.2 (our worst-case scenario), we find that the secondary peak occurs in winter 2020 with a daily maximum of 387 000 infectious individuals and 125 000 daily new cases; threefold greater than in a scenario with permanent immunity. Our models suggest that longitudinal serological surveys to determine if immunity in the population is waning will be most informative when sampling takes place from the end of the lockdown in June until autumn 2020. After this period, the proportion of the population with antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 is expected to increase due to the secondary wave. Overall, our analysis presents considerations for policy makers on the longer-term dynamics of SARS-CoV-2 in the UK and suggests that strategies designed to achieve herd immunity may lead to repeated waves of infection as immunity to reinfection is not permanent. This article is part of the theme issue 'Modelling that shaped the early COVID-19 pandemic response in the UK'.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/trends , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Basic Reproduction Number/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/virology , Humans , United Kingdom/epidemiology
7.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(1): e199-e205, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1290577

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We evaluated the risk of death for health-care workers (HCW) with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection in Mexico City during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, and describe the associated factors in hospitalized HCW, compared with non-HCW. METHODS: We analyzed data from laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 cases registered from 27 February-31 August 2020 in Mexico City's public database. Individuals were classified as non-HCW or HCW (subcategorized as physicians, nurses, and other HCW). In hospitalized individuals, a multivariate logistic regression model was used to analyze the potential factors associated with death and compare mortality risks among groups. RESULTS: A total of 125 665 patients were included. Of these, 13.1% were HCW (28% physicians, 38% nurses, and 34% other HCW). Compared with non-HCW, HCW were more frequently female, were younger, and had fewer comorbidities. Overall, 25 771 (20.5%) were treated as inpatients and 11 182 (8.9%) deaths were reported. Deaths in the total population (9.9% vs 1.9%, respectively; P < .001) and in hospitalized patients (39.6% vs 19.3%, respectively; P < .001) were significantly higher in non-HCW than in HCW. In hospitalized patients, using a multivariate model, the risk of death was lower in HCW in general (odds ratio [OR], 0.53) than in non-HCW, and the risks were also lower by specific occupation (OR for physicians, 0.60; OR for nurses, 0.29; OR for other HCW 0.61). CONCLUSIONS: HCW represent an important proportion of individuals with SARS-CoV-2 infection in Mexico City. While the mortality risk is lower in HCW compared to non-HCW, a high mortality rate in hospitalized patients was observed in this study. Among HCW, nurses had a lower risk of death compared to physicians and other HCW.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Mexico , Pandemics
8.
Int J Infect Dis ; 106: 43-51, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279598

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical characteristics and outcomes of hospitalized coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients in a middle east respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) referral hospital during the peak months of the pandemic. DESIGN: A single-center case series of hospitalized individuals with confirmed severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infections in King Saud University Medical City (KSUMC), an academic tertiary care hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Clinical and biochemical markers were documented. Risks for ventilatory support, intensive care unit (ICU) admission and death are presented. RESULTS: Out of 12,688 individuals tested for SARS-CoV-2 by real time reverse transcriptase polymerase reaction (RT-PCR) from June 1 to August 31, 2020, 2,683 (21%) were positive for COVID-19. Of the latter, 605 (22%) patients required hospitalization with a median age of 55, 368 (61%) were male. The most common comorbidities were hypertension (43%) and diabetes (42%). Most patients presented with fever (66%), dyspnea (65%), cough (61%), elevated IL-6 (93.5%), D-dimer (90.1%), CRP (86.1%), and lymphopenia (41.7%). No MERS-CoV co-infection was detected. Overall, 91 patients (15%) died; risk factors associated with mortality were an age of 65 years or older OR 2.29 [95%CI 1.43-3.67], presence of two or more comorbidities OR 3.17 [95%CI 2.00-5.02], symptoms duration of seven days or less OR 3.189 [95%CI (1.64 - 6.19]) lymphopenia OR 3.388 [95%CI 2.10-5.44], high CRP OR 2.85 [95%CI 1.1-7.32], high AST OR 2.95 [95%CI 1.77-4.90], high creatinine OR 3.71 [95%CI 2.30-5.99], and high troponin-I OR 2.84 [95%CI 1.33-6.05]. CONCLUSION: There is a significant increase in severe cases of COVID-19. Mortality was associated with older age, shorter symptom duration, high CRP, low lymphocyte count, and end-organ damage.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Hospitalization , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/physiology , Pandemics , Referral and Consultation , Adult , Aged , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Factors
9.
JAMA Oncol ; 2021 06 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1274650

ABSTRACT

Importance: COVID-19 is a life-threatening illness for many patients. Prior studies have established hematologic cancers as a risk factor associated with particularly poor outcomes from COVID-19. To our knowledge, no studies have established a beneficial role for anti-COVID-19 interventions in this at-risk population. Convalescent plasma therapy may benefit immunocompromised individuals with COVID-19, including those with hematologic cancers. Objective: To evaluate the association of convalescent plasma treatment with 30-day mortality in hospitalized adults with hematologic cancers and COVID-19 from a multi-institutional cohort. Design, Setting, and Participants: This retrospective cohort study using data from the COVID-19 and Cancer Consortium registry with propensity score matching evaluated patients with hematologic cancers who were hospitalized for COVID-19. Data were collected between March 17, 2020, and January 21, 2021. Exposures: Convalescent plasma treatment at any time during hospitalization. Main Outcomes and Measures: The main outcome was 30-day all-cause mortality. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis with adjustment for potential confounders was performed. Hazard ratios (HRs) are reported with 95% CIs. Secondary subgroup analyses were conducted on patients with severe COVID-19 who required mechanical ventilatory support and/or intensive care unit admission. Results: A total of 966 individuals (mean [SD] age, 65 [15] years; 539 [55.8%] male) were evaluated in this study; 143 convalescent plasma recipients were compared with 823 untreated control patients. After adjustment for potential confounding factors, convalescent plasma treatment was associated with improved 30-day mortality (HR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.37-0.97). This association remained significant after propensity score matching (HR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.29-0.92). Among the 338 patients admitted to the intensive care unit, mortality was significantly lower in convalescent plasma recipients compared with nonrecipients (HR for propensity score-matched comparison, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.20-0.80). Among the 227 patients who required mechanical ventilatory support, mortality was significantly lower in convalescent plasma recipients compared with nonrecipients (HR for propensity score-matched comparison, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.14-0.72). Conclusions and Relevance: The findings of this cohort study suggest a potential survival benefit in the administration of convalescent plasma to patients with hematologic cancers and COVID-19.

10.
Open Forum Infect Dis ; 8(6): ofab257, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1266129

ABSTRACT

Among hospitalized persons under investigation for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), more repeated severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) after a negative NAAT were positive from lower than from upper respiratory tract specimens (1.9% vs 1.0%, P = .033). Lower respiratory testing should be prioritized among patients displaying respiratory symptoms with moderate-to-high suspicion for COVID-19 after 1 negative upper respiratory NAAT.

11.
NPJ Prim Care Respir Med ; 31(1): 33, 2021 06 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1258582

ABSTRACT

Accurate prediction of the risk of progression of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is needed at the time of hospitalization. Logistic regression analyses are used to interrogate clinical and laboratory co-variates from every hospital admission from an area of 2 million people with sporadic cases. From a total of 98 subjects, 3 were severe COVID-19 on admission. From the remaining subjects, 24 developed severe/critical symptoms. The predictive model includes four co-variates: age (>60 years; odds ratio [OR] = 12 [2.3, 62]); blood oxygen saturation (<97%; OR = 10.4 [2.04, 53]); C-reactive protein (>5.75 mg/L; OR = 9.3 [1.5, 58]); and prothrombin time (>12.3 s; OR = 6.7 [1.1, 41]). Cutoff value is two factors, and the sensitivity and specificity are 96% and 78% respectively. The area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve is 0.937. This model is suitable in predicting which unselected newly hospitalized persons are at-risk to develop severe/critical COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/pathology , Child , Child, Preschool , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Infant , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Oxygen/blood , Prognosis , Prothrombin Time , ROC Curve , Risk Assessment , Sensitivity and Specificity , Young Adult
12.
ISA Trans ; 2021 May 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1237731

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 outbreak is an epidemic disease caused by the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). When a new virus emerges, generally, little is known about it, and no vaccines or other pharmaceutical interventions are available. In the case of a person-to-person transmission virus with no vaccines or other pharmaceutical interventions, the only way to control the virus outbreak is by keeping a sustained physical distancing between the individuals. However, to adjust the level of the physical distancing accurately can be so complicated. Any level above the necessary can compromise the economic activity, and any level below can collapse the health care system. This work proposes a controller to keep the number of hospitalized individuals below a limit, and a new group-structured model to describe the COVID-19 outbreak. The proposed controller is robust to the uncertainties in the parameters of the model and keeps the number of infected individuals controlled only by adjusting the social distancing level. Numerical simulations, to show the behavior of the proposed controller and model, are done.

13.
PLoS One ; 16(5): e0245031, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1234580

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection causing the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been responsible for more than 2.8 million deaths and nearly 125 million infections worldwide as of March 2021. In March 2020, the World Health Organization determined that the COVID-19 outbreak is a global pandemic. The urgency and magnitude of this pandemic demanded immediate action and coordination between local, regional, national, and international actors. In that mission, researchers require access to high-quality biological materials and data from SARS-CoV-2 infected and uninfected patients, covering the spectrum of disease manifestations. The "Biobanque québécoise de la COVID-19" (BQC19) is a pan-provincial initiative undertaken in Québec, Canada to enable the collection, storage and sharing of samples and data related to the COVID-19 crisis. As a disease-oriented biobank based on high-quality biosamples and clinical data of hospitalized and non-hospitalized SARS-CoV-2 PCR positive and negative individuals. The BQC19 follows a legal and ethical management framework approved by local health authorities. The biosamples include plasma, serum, peripheral blood mononuclear cells and DNA and RNA isolated from whole blood. In addition to the clinical variables, BQC19 will provide in-depth analytical data derived from the biosamples including whole genome and transcriptome sequencing, proteome and metabolome analyses, multiplex measurements of key circulating markers as well as anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody responses. BQC19 will provide the scientific and medical communities access to data and samples to better understand, manage and ultimately limit, the impact of COVID-19. In this paper we present BQC19, describe the process according to which it is governed and organized, and address opportunities for future research collaborations. BQC19 aims to be a part of a global communal effort addressing the challenges of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Biological Specimen Banks/organization & administration , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , Humans , Information Dissemination/methods , Pandemics , Quebec/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
14.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(11): 2055-2064, 2021 12 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1233845

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Emerging evidence suggests many people have persistent symptoms after acute coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) illness. Our objective was to estimate the prevalence and correlates of post-acute sequelae of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection (PASC). METHODS: We used a population-based probability survey of adults with COVID-19 in Michigan. Living noninstitutionalized adults aged ≥18 in the Michigan Disease Surveillance System with COVID-19 onset through mid-April 2020 were eligible for selection (N = 28 000). Among 2000 selected, 629 completed the survey between June-December 2020. We estimated PASC prevalence, defined as persistent symptoms ≥30 (30-day COVID-19) or ≥60 (60-day COVID-19) days post-COVID-19 onset, overall and by sociodemographic and clinical factors. We used modified Poisson regression to produce adjusted prevalence ratios (aPRs) for potential risk factors. RESULTS: The analytic sample (n = 593) was predominantly female (56.1%), aged ≥45 years (68.2%), and non-Hispanic White (46.3%) or Black (34.8%). Thirty- and 60-day COVID-19 were highly prevalent (52.5% and 35.0%), even among nonhospitalized respondents (43.7% and 26.9%) and respondents reporting mild symptoms (29.2% and 24.5%). Respondents reporting very severe (vs mild) symptoms had 2.25 times higher prevalence of 30-day COVID-19 (aPR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.46-3.46) and 1.71 times higher prevalence of 60-day COVID-19 (aPR, 1.71; 95% CI: 1.02-2.88). Hospitalized (vs nonhospitalized) respondents had ~40% higher prevalence of both 30-day (aPR, 1.37; 95% CI: 1.12-1.69) and 60-day (aPR, 1.40; 95% CI: 1.02-1.93) COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: PASC is highly prevalent among cases reporting severe initial symptoms and, to a lesser extent, cases reporting mild and moderate symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Disease Progression , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Prevalence
15.
Immunity ; 54(6): 1257-1275.e8, 2021 06 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1230571

ABSTRACT

The kinetics of the immune changes in COVID-19 across severity groups have not been rigorously assessed. Using immunophenotyping, RNA sequencing, and serum cytokine analysis, we analyzed serial samples from 207 SARS-CoV2-infected individuals with a range of disease severities over 12 weeks from symptom onset. An early robust bystander CD8+ T cell immune response, without systemic inflammation, characterized asymptomatic or mild disease. Hospitalized individuals had delayed bystander responses and systemic inflammation that was already evident near symptom onset, indicating that immunopathology may be inevitable in some individuals. Viral load did not correlate with this early pathological response but did correlate with subsequent disease severity. Immune recovery is complex, with profound persistent cellular abnormalities in severe disease correlating with altered inflammatory responses, with signatures associated with increased oxidative phosphorylation replacing those driven by cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin (IL)-6. These late immunometabolic and immune defects may have clinical implications.


Subject(s)
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Lymphocyte Activation/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Biomarkers , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Susceptibility , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Longitudinal Studies , Lymphocyte Activation/genetics , Oxidative Phosphorylation , Phenotype , Prognosis , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , Severity of Illness Index , Transcriptome
16.
Chaos Solitons Fractals ; 148: 110991, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1220796

ABSTRACT

We propose a refined version of the stochastic SEIR model for epidemic of the new corona virus SARS-Cov-2, causing the COVID-19 disease, taking into account the spread of the virus due to the regular infected individuals (transmission coefficient ß ), hospitalized individuals (transmission coefficient l ß , l > 0 ) and superspreaders (transmission coefficient ß ' ). The model is constructed from the corresponding ordinary differential model by introducing two independent environmental white noises in transmission coefficients for above mentioned classes - one noise for infected and hospitalized individuals and the other for superspreaders. Therefore, the model is defined as a system of stochastic differential equations driven by two independent standard Brownian motions. Existence and uniqueness of the global positive solution is proven, and conditions under which extinction and persistence in mean hold are given. The theoretical results are illustrated via numerical simulations.

17.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 9679, 2021 05 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1220211

ABSTRACT

There is not in Argentina publications regarding the presentation of patients with COVID-19 requiring hospitalized and emergency care in vulnerable populations (lower incomes and less education tend at greater risk for poor health status and healthcare access), and it has few reports in developing countries. The objective is to determine whether in the care of vulnerable patients, to succeed against COVID-19, multiple public health tools and interventions will be needed to minimize morbidity and mortality. The study is a prospective cohort investigation of patients with lab-confirmed COVID-19, who required to any of the Health Centers response from April 8, 2020, to August 18, 2020. In Buenos Aires Metropolitan Area (AMBA), April 8, 2020 the virus was identified in patients hospitalized in the "Southeast Network" (SN), AMBA. SN covering an area of 661 square kilometers, with 1.8 million inhabitants residing in urban, and rural areas. A total of 14 health centers with different levels of care complexity provide care to patients in the region. The information of each patient with COVID-19 evaluated by SN, was incorporated in an Epidemiological Dashboard. The investigation was designed and reported with consideration of observational studies in epidemiology. We describe the hospitals presentation and care of persons who required SN response and were ultimately diagnosed with COVID-19. From April 8, 2020, to August 18, 2020, were included 1495 patients with lab-confirmed COVID-19 in SN. A total of 58% patients were men, and the mean age (SD) was 48.9 (15.59) years. Eighty one percent patients with pre-existing diseases, most frequent hypertension and diabetes, but hypertension, chronic lung disease, and cardiovascular disease presented higher risk. A total of 13% were hospitalized in Intensive Therapy Unit. The mortality of the cohort was 9.77%. Mortality was higher for patients aged 65 or more (OR 5.09), and for those had some pre-existing disease (OR 2.61). Our observations are consistent with reports demonstrating older persons, and those with comorbidities have the highest risk of mortality related to COVID-19. However, unlike other reports from developed or some developing countries, the mortality in our study is lower. This finding may be related to age of our cohort is younger than other published. Also, the health system was able to respond to the demand.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , Aged , Argentina/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Public Health , Vulnerable Populations
18.
J Med Virol ; 93(9): 5603-5607, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1198392

ABSTRACT

It has been estimated that individuals with COVID-19 can shed replication-competent virus up to a maximum of 20 days after initiation of symptoms. The majority of studies that addressed this situation involved hospitalized individuals and those with severe disease. Studies to address the possible presence of SARS-CoV-2 during the different phases of COVID-19 disease in mildly infected individuals, and utilization of viral culture techniques to identify replication-competent viruses, have been limited. This report describes two patients with mild forms of the disease who shed replication-competent virus for 24 and 37 days, respectively, after symptom onset.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , Virus Cultivation , Animals , Chlorocebus aethiops , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Vero Cells/ultrastructure , Vero Cells/virology , Viral Load , Virus Shedding
19.
Am J Psychiatry ; 178(6): 541-547, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1169925

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The authors sought to characterize the association between prior mood disorder diagnosis and hospital outcomes among individuals admitted with COVID-19 to six Eastern Massachusetts hospitals. METHODS: A retrospective cohort was drawn from the electronic health records of two academic medical centers and four community hospitals between February 15 and May 24, 2020. Associations between history of mood disorder and in-hospital mortality and hospital discharge home were examined using regression models among any hospitalized patients with positive tests for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). RESULTS: Among 2,988 admitted individuals, 717 (24.0%) had a prior mood disorder diagnosis. In Cox regression models adjusted for age, sex, and hospital site, presence of a mood disorder prior to admission was associated with greater in-hospital mortality risk beyond hospital day 12 (crude hazard ratio=2.156, 95% CI=1.540, 3.020; fully adjusted hazard ratio=1.540, 95% CI=1.054, 2.250). A mood disorder diagnosis was also associated with greater likelihood of discharge to a skilled nursing facility or other rehabilitation facility rather than home (crude odds ratio=2.035, 95% CI=1.661, 2.493; fully adjusted odds ratio=1.504, 95% CI=1.132, 1.999). CONCLUSIONS: Hospitalized individuals with a history of mood disorder may be at risk for greater COVID-19 morbidity and mortality and are at increased risk of need for postacute care. Further studies should investigate the mechanism by which these disorders may confer elevated risk.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Mood Disorders/complications , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , Cohort Studies , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Treatment Outcome
20.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 57(3)2021 Mar 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1167648

ABSTRACT

Background and Objectives: COVID-19, a disease caused by SARS-CoV-2, is a public health emergency. Data on the effect of the virus on pregnancy are limited. Materials and Methods: We carried out a retrospective descriptive study, in order to evaluate the obstetric results on pregnant women in which SARS-CoV-2 was detected through RT-PCR of the nasopharyngeal swab, at admission to the maternity hospital. Results: From 16 March to 31 July 2020, 12 SARS-CoV-2 positive pregnant women have been hospitalized. Eleven were hospitalized for initiation or induction of labor, corresponding to 0.64% of deliveries in the maternity hospital. One pregnant woman was hospitalized for threatened abortion, culminating in a stillbirth at 20 weeks of gestation. Regarding the severity of the disease, nine women were asymptomatic and three had mild illness (two had associated cough and one headache). Three had relevant environmental exposure and a history of contact with infected persons. None had severe or critical illness due to SARS-CoV-2. There were no maternal deaths. The following gestational complications were observed: one stillbirth, one preterm labor, one preterm prelabor rupture of membranes, and one fetal growth restriction. Four deliveries were eutocic, two vacuum-assisted deliveries and five were cesarean sections. The indications for cesarean section were obstetric. Conclusions: SARS-CoV-2 infection was found in a minority of hospitalized pregnant women in this sample. Most are asymptomatic or have mild illness, from gestational complications to highlight stillbirth and preterm birth. There were no cases of vertical transmission by coronavirus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Adult , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cesarean Section , Cough/physiopathology , Female , Fetal Growth Retardation/epidemiology , Fetal Membranes, Premature Rupture/epidemiology , Headache/physiopathology , Hospitalization , Hospitals, Maternity , Humans , Labor, Induced , Obstetric Labor, Premature/epidemiology , Portugal/epidemiology , Postpartum Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Outcome , Premature Birth/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Stillbirth/epidemiology , Vacuum Extraction, Obstetrical
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