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1.
J Med Virol ; 92(10): 2227-2231, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-935128

ABSTRACT

Patients with coronavirus disease-2019 may be discharged based on clinical resolution of symptoms, and evidence for viral RNA clearance from the upper respiratory tract. Understanding the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) viral clearance profile is crucial to establish a re-testing plan on discharge and ending isolation of patients. We aimed to evaluate the number of days that a patient needed to achieve undetectable levels of SARS-CoV-2 in upper respiratory tract specimens (nasopharyngeal swab and/or an oropharyngeal swab). The clearance and persistence of viral RNA was evaluated in two groups of positive patients: those who achieved two negative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) tests and those who kept testing positive. Patients were organized thereafter in two subgroups, mild illness patients discharged home and inpatients who had moderate to severe illness. Results from RT-PCR tests were then correlated with results from the evaluation of the immune response. The study evidenced that most patients tested positive for more than 2 weeks and that persistence of viral RNA is not necessarily associated with severe disease but may result from a weaker immune response instead.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Patient Discharge/statistics & numerical data , RNA, Viral/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Testing/methods , Child , Convalescence , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nasopharynx/virology , Oropharynx/virology , Retrospective Studies , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index
2.
Sci Immunol ; 5(52)2020 10 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-842518

ABSTRACT

We measured plasma and/or serum antibody responses to the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of the spike (S) protein of SARS-CoV-2 in 343 North American patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 (of which 93% required hospitalization) up to 122 days after symptom onset and compared them to responses in 1548 individuals whose blood samples were obtained prior to the pandemic. After setting seropositivity thresholds for perfect specificity (100%), we estimated sensitivities of 95% for IgG, 90% for IgA, and 81% for IgM for detecting infected individuals between 15 and 28 days after symptom onset. While the median time to seroconversion was nearly 12 days across all three isotypes tested, IgA and IgM antibodies against RBD were short-lived with median times to seroreversion of 71 and 49 days after symptom onset. In contrast, anti-RBD IgG responses decayed slowly through 90 days with only 3 seropositive individuals seroreverting within this time period. IgG antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 RBD were strongly correlated with anti-S neutralizing antibody titers, which demonstrated little to no decrease over 75 days since symptom onset. We observed no cross-reactivity of the SARS-CoV-2 RBD-targeted antibodies with other widely circulating coronaviruses (HKU1, 229 E, OC43, NL63). These data suggest that RBD-targeted antibodies are excellent markers of previous and recent infection, that differential isotype measurements can help distinguish between recent and older infections, and that IgG responses persist over the first few months after infection and are highly correlated with neutralizing antibodies.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Protein Domains/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cross Reactions , Dried Blood Spot Testing , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin A/blood , Immunoglobulin A/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Immunoglobulin M/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry
3.
bioRxiv ; 2020 Sep 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-807634

ABSTRACT

Following emergence in late 2019, SARS-CoV-2 rapidly became pandemic and is presently responsible for millions of infections and hundreds of thousands of deaths worldwide. There is currently no approved vaccine to halt the spread of SARS-CoV-2 and only very few treatment options are available to manage COVID-19 patients. For development of preclinical countermeasures, reliable and well-characterized small animal disease models will be of paramount importance. Here we show that intranasal inoculation of SARS-CoV-2 into Syrian hamsters consistently caused moderate broncho-interstitial pneumonia, with high viral lung loads and extensive virus shedding, but animals only displayed transient mild disease. We determined the infectious dose 50 to be only five infectious particles, making the Syrian hamster a highly susceptible model for SARS-CoV-2 infection. Neither hamster age nor sex had any impact on the severity of disease or course of infection. Finally, prolonged viral persistence in interleukin 2 receptor gamma chain knockout hamsters revealed susceptibility of SARS-CoV-2 to adaptive immune control. In conclusion, the Syrian hamster is highly susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 making it a very suitable infection model for COVID-19 countermeasure development.

4.
Math Biosci ; 328: 108438, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-696903

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), an infectious disease caused by the infection of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), is spreading and causing the global coronavirus pandemic. The viral dynamics of SARS-CoV-2 infection have not been quantitatively investigated. In this paper, we use mathematical models to study the pathogenic features of SARS-CoV-2 infection by examining the interaction between the virus, cells and immune responses. Models are fit to the data of SARS-CoV-2 infection in patients and non-human primates. Data fitting and numerical simulation show that viral dynamics of SARS-CoV-2 infection have a few distinct stages. In the initial stage, viral load increases rapidly and reaches the peak, followed by a plateau phase possibly generated by lymphocytes as a secondary target of infection. In the last stage, viral load declines due to the emergence of adaptive immune responses. When the initiation of seroconversion is late or slow, the model predicts viral rebound and prolonged viral persistence, consistent with the observation in non-human primates. Using the model we also evaluate the effect of several potential therapeutic interventions for SARS-CoV-2 infection. Model simulation shows that anti-inflammatory treatments or antiviral drugs combined with interferon are effective in reducing the duration of the viral plateau phase and diminishing the time to recovery. These results provide insights for understanding the infection dynamics and might help develop treatment strategies against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Models, Biological , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Adaptive Immunity , Animals , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/immunology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Humans , Macaca mulatta , Mathematical Concepts , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , RNA, Viral/analysis , RNA, Viral/genetics , SARS-CoV-2 , Viral Load
5.
EBioMedicine ; 59: 102915, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-691414

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The serologic response of individuals with mild forms of SARS-CoV-2 infection is poorly characterized. METHODS: Hospital staff who had recovered from mild forms of PCR-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection were tested for anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies using two assays: a rapid immunodiagnostic test (99.4% specificity) and the S-Flow assay (~99% specificity). The neutralizing activity of the sera was tested with a pseudovirus-based assay. FINDINGS: Of 162 hospital staff who participated in the investigation, 160 reported SARS-CoV-2 infection that had not required hospital admission and were included in these analyses. The median time from symptom onset to blood sample collection was 24 days (IQR: 21-28, range 13-39). The rapid immunodiagnostic test detected antibodies in 153 (95.6%) of the samples and the S-Flow assay in 159 (99.4%), failing to detect antibodies in one sample collected 18 days after symptom onset (the rapid test did not detect antibodies in that patient). Neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) were detected in 79%, 92% and 98% of samples collected 13-20, 21-27 and 28-41 days after symptom onset, respectively (P = 0.02). INTERPRETATION: Antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 were detected in virtually all hospital staff sampled from 13 days after the onset of COVID-19 symptoms. This finding supports the use of serologic testing for the diagnosis of individuals who have recovered from SARS-CoV-2 infection. The neutralizing activity of the antibodies increased overtime. Future studies will help assess the persistence of the humoral response and its associated neutralization capacity in recovered patients. FUNDINGS: The funders had no role in study design, data collection, interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Adult , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , France , Health Personnel , Hospitals , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , RNA, Viral/metabolism , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Serologic Tests , Severity of Illness Index
6.
Cureus ; 12(7): e9048, 2020 Jul 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-664065

ABSTRACT

In the world scenario, the advent of COVID-19 has halted every aspect of life. It influenced every field of life, including the economy, and revealed the inadequacies in all nations' healthcare systems, from the most developed to the underdeveloped countries. There is a debate about the timing of antibodies production and detection during the disease. What is the significance of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) viral ribonucleic acid (RNA) in symptom resolving period? In the present manuscript, we have evaluated these points.

10.
Chin Med J (Engl) ; 133(9): 1039-1043, 2020 May 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-10492

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A patient's infectivity is determined by the presence of the virus in different body fluids, secretions, and excreta. The persistence and clearance of viral RNA from different specimens of patients with 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) remain unclear. This study analyzed the clearance time and factors influencing 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) RNA in different samples from patients with COVID-19, providing further evidence to improve the management of patients during convalescence. METHODS: The clinical data and laboratory test results of convalescent patients with COVID-19 who were admitted to from January 20, 2020 to February 10, 2020 were collected retrospectively. The reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) results for patients' oropharyngeal swab, stool, urine, and serum samples were collected and analyzed. Convalescent patients refer to recovered non-febrile patients without respiratory symptoms who had two successive (minimum 24 h sampling interval) negative RT-PCR results for viral RNA from oropharyngeal swabs. The effects of cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4)+ T lymphocytes, inflammatory indicators, and glucocorticoid treatment on viral nucleic acid clearance were analyzed. RESULTS: In the 292 confirmed cases, 66 patients recovered after treatment and were included in our study. In total, 28 (42.4%) women and 38 men (57.6%) with a median age of 44.0 (34.0-62.0) years were analyzed. After in-hospital treatment, patients' inflammatory indicators decreased with improved clinical condition. The median time from the onset of symptoms to first negative RT-PCR results for oropharyngeal swabs in convalescent patients was 9.5 (6.0-11.0) days. By February 10, 2020, 11 convalescent patients (16.7%) still tested positive for viral RNA from stool specimens and the other 55 patients' stool specimens were negative for 2019-nCoV following a median duration of 11.0 (9.0-16.0) days after symptom onset. Among these 55 patients, 43 had a longer duration until stool specimens were negative for viral RNA than for throat swabs, with a median delay of 2.0 (1.0-4.0) days. Results for only four (6.9%) urine samples were positive for viral nucleic acid out of 58 cases; viral RNA was still present in three patients' urine specimens after throat swabs were negative. Using a multiple linear regression model (F = 2.669, P = 0.044, and adjusted R = 0.122), the analysis showed that the CD4+ T lymphocyte count may help predict the duration of viral RNA detection in patients' stools (t = -2.699, P = 0.010). The duration of viral RNA detection from oropharyngeal swabs and fecal samples in the glucocorticoid treatment group was longer than that in the non-glucocorticoid treatment group (15 days vs. 8.0 days, respectively; t = 2.550, P = 0.013) and the duration of viral RNA detection in fecal samples in the glucocorticoid treatment group was longer than that in the non-glucocorticoid treatment group (20 days vs. 11 days, respectively; t = 4.631, P < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in inflammatory indicators between patients with positive fecal viral RNA test results and those with negative results (P > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: In brief, as the clearance of viral RNA in patients' stools was delayed compared to that in oropharyngeal swabs, it is important to identify viral RNA in feces during convalescence. Because of the delayed clearance of viral RNA in the glucocorticoid treatment group, glucocorticoids are not recommended in the treatment of COVID-19, especially for mild disease. The duration of RNA detection may relate to host cell immunity.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , RNA, Viral/genetics , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/rehabilitation , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/rehabilitation , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
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