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1.
Curr Opin Anaesthesiol ; 34(2): 176-179, 2021 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1956586

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Healthcare provider burnout is a real phenomenon. The rates of burnout are on the rise. Burnout-associated suicide amongst physicians represents a real "public health crisis." This article discusses the drivers of burnout and offers some strategies to mitigate burnout and improve well-being. RECENT FINDINGS: Measures of burnout such as stress, micro, and macro-aggression in the workplace have a psychological impact on staff. Additionally, a measurable economic price is exacted when an organization fails to address the lack of well-being burnout represents. SUMMARY: As healthcare providers struggle to survive and deal with the complex new set of problems and obstacles that the COVID-19 pandemic, the National economic crisis, and the increasing regulatory obligations have summoned forth, professional burnout rates have risen drastically. With good leadership, developing comprehensive programs to identify, track, and treat burnout symptoms and improve well-being in the work environment can result in greater work satisfaction and save resources.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Physicians , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Ecancermedicalscience ; 15: 1213, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1809338

ABSTRACT

Burnout (BO) syndrome is a condition that results in physical and mental distress. The current COVID-19 pandemic is strongly affecting the mental health of the general population. We aimed to assess the incidence of BO among medical oncologists and determine factors associated with burnout levels during the current pandemic. METHODS: A digital survey was created for this study. The Spanish-validated version of Maslach BO Inventory was incorporated to define BO. Social and demographic information was analysed to remove duplicated answers. RESULTS: A total of 188 Argentinian medical oncologists from 16 cities participated in the survey. The median age of the participants was 43 years (IQR 38-50) and a similar distribution between male and female was observed. At the time of the survey, Argentina was in the third month of strict lockdown. Most of the participants practiced in both public and private practice facilities (55.3%) and the majority reported more than 10 years of experience (53.2%). Twenty-five percent (43) of subjects reported high levels of DP, 39.9% (75) reported high levels of EE and 53.7% (101) reported low levels of PA. BO Maslach criteria were fulfilled by 14.9% (28). We compared this result with other burnout assessment tools. Using the Gil-Monte and Neira tool, BO-associated domains were altered in 77.1%, 42% and 42% for EE, DP, and PA domains, respectively. Concomitantly, under Neira assessment a domain impairment was appreciated in 77.1%, 76% and 54% respectively. BO criteria were met by 30.3% (57) according to Gil-Monte and 47.9% (90) to Neira. CONCLUSION: BO is a multifaceted issue with a negative impact on physicians, patients, and institutions. During the COVID-19 pandemic, BO criteria was met in a considerable proportion of survey respondents using MBI, and Peiro and Neiro tools and younger age, use of antidepressants and psychological medications and income reduction arose as statistically significant factors after multivariate analysis.

3.
J Healthc Leadersh ; 12: 85-94, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793328

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The aim of the study is to evaluate the prevalence and extent of burnout among physicians and investigate the factors related with burnout and the influence of the fight against coronavirus (COVID-19) on the burnout syndrome. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey design was adopted and conducted on 200 actively working physicians in Izmir/Turkey. Personal Information Form and Maslach Burnout Inventory were used in the survey. RESULTS: The findings showed that the emotional exhaustion level of the physicians was medium, the levels of depersonalization and personal accomplishment were low, and the level of total burnout was low. It was observed that the burnout levels of males and females, and married and single physicians were similar. The emotional exhaustion level of 18-23-year-old physicians was lower than the rest of the physicians. Physicians' level of satisfaction with their income is not effective on burnout. The burnout level of physicians who did not choose their profession willingly was determined to be higher than the burnout level of the physicians who chose their profession willingly. One important finding showed that the burnout level of physicians who actively involved in the fight against COVID-19 was lower than the burnout level of the physicians who did not actively involve in the fight against COVID-19. CONCLUSION: Although the impact of some demographic variables, such as gender, marital status and satisfaction of income on burnout, was similar among the groups, total burnout level was lower in physicians who actively fought with the virus. This result may suggest that those physicians who were actively involved in the fight against COVID-19 had a high sense of meaningfulness of work which will result in high satisfaction with the work itself and, thus, creating less burnout. Also, they had a stronger feeling of personal accomplishment as they faced the immediate outcomes of their care for people infected by COVID-19.

4.
Telemed J E Health ; 27(12): 1344-1345, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575137

ABSTRACT

Higher rates of burnout among female physicians as compared with male physicians remain a troubling phenomenon. Achieving gender equity in academic advancement is a critical component of addressing this gap. During the timeframe of childbearing and rearing, enhanced control and flexibility are desired workplace changes and offered by telehealth work modalities. This viewpoint explores the role of telehealth and the remote work environment in optimizing control and flexibility, which can increase participation in academic advancement opportunities and improve female physician burnout. Widespread promotion of remote clinical practice and participation in scholarly activities beyond the duration of the COVID-19 pandemic may be a component of the long-term solution to female physician burnout.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Workplace
5.
Curr Psychol ; 40(11): 5763-5771, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1520475

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus stress has been associated with undesirable mental health and well-being outcomes, including burnout. However, little is known about the underlying mechanism of change. The present study aimed to examine if optimism and social connectedness mediated the relationship between coronavirus stress and COVID-19 burnout in a large sample of healthcare staffs. Participants included 1046 healthcare staffs (56.8% females) aged 20-61 years (mean age = 30.29 years, SD = 7.80), who completed the measures of coronavirus stress, optimism, social connectedness, and COVID-19 burnout. Females reported more coronavirus stress and burnout and less social connectedness. People confirmed with COVID-19 reported lower optimism. The results indicated that coronavirus stress did not only have a direct effect on increased COVID-19 burnout but also had an indirect effect on it through reduced optimism and social connectedness. These results are important given the shortage of intervention efforts targeting coronavirus stress. Future intervention efforts aimed at reducing coronavirus stress and related outcomes may benefit from simultaneously focusing on optimism and social connectedness.

6.
New Dir Child Adolesc Dev ; 2020(174): 169-184, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1464536
7.
J Occup Environ Med ; 63(8): 642-645, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1402735

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To measure the prevalence of burnout among healthcare workers (HCWs) in primary care during the COVID-19 pandemic and to understand the association between burnout, job-person fit, and perceptions of the pandemic. METHODS: We surveyed 147 HCWs (73% response rate) in two clinics in the summer of 2020 on their burnout, job-person fit, perceptions of the pandemic, and demographic/job characteristics. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to explore relationships between these variables. RESULTS: Forty-three percent of HCWs reported burnout. Lower HCW burnout was associated with better job-person fit in the areas of recognition or appreciation at work (odds ratio [OR] 0.26, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.10 to 0.67) and congruent worker-organization goals and values (OR 0.30, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.76). CONCLUSIONS: Working environments with better job-person fit may be key to reducing HCW burnout even after the current crisis.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics , Primary Health Care , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Front Public Health ; 9: 667379, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389257

ABSTRACT

The 2019-nCOVID pandemic as a public health emergency has faced healthcare systems with unprecedented challenges. Our study aimed to focus on the mental health impact of the 2019-nCOVID pandemic on healthcare workers (HCWs) from North-Eastern Piedmont, Italy. For this purpose, we performed an online survey which was e-mailed to HCWs at the end of the first peak of the pandemic. We involved both frontline and not-frontline HCWs, employed in the hospital or in healthcare services outside the hospital. The primary outcome of our research was the assessment of burnout, while secondary outcomes included the investigation of anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress symptoms. We observed higher levels of burnout (especially in the Depersonalization and Personal Accomplishment dimensions), in females, in HCWs aged <30 years, in those exposed to changes in their daily and family habits, in those who had to change their duties at work and in residents in training. In our HCWs sample we found lower levels of anxiety and depression than those reported in the literature. The problematic levels of burnout and adverse psychological outcomes observed during the pandemic cannot be underestimated. Given the recurrence in autumn 2020 of a new pandemic peak, which has once again put a strain on the health system and HCWs, it is supported the importance of a careful assessment of HCWs' mental health, and of the possible risk and protective factors both in the work environment and in the extra-work one.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(7)2021 04 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1378299

ABSTRACT

The present study describes the semantic nature of burnout and engagement in the operators involved in the management of illegal immigration. Semi-structured interviews were conducted on a sample of Italian practitioners (n = 62) of the two levels of the reception system considered: (1) rescue and first aid and (2) reception and integration. Within the framework of the job demands-resources model (JD-R), the interviews deepened the analysis of the positive and negative dimensions of burnout and engagement: exhaustion versus energy, relational deterioration versus relational involvement, professional inefficacy versus professional efficacy and disillusion versus trust. The interviews were analysed using the T-Lab software, through a cluster analysis (bisecting K-means algorithm), which emphasised noteworthy themes. The results show that, in the vast majority of the dimensions considered (for both levels of reception), the same dimensions of engagement of the operators (energy, relational involvement, professional efficacy and trust) are able to lead them into a condition of burnout, with experiences, conversely, of exhaustion, relational deterioration, professional inefficacy and disillusion. These findings expand the knowledge on burnout and engagement in practitioners of illegal immigration, a context characterised by the value of help and welcome.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Emigration and Immigration , Burnout, Psychological , Humans , Italy , Mediterranean Sea , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
J Breast Imaging ; 3(3): 332-342, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331552

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to determine the major stressors affecting practicing breast radiologists. METHODS: All members of the Society of Breast Imaging within the United States received an email invitation to complete an anonymous survey evaluating stressors that may contribute to physician burnout. Stressors evaluated included pace at work, work-life balance, care of dependents, job security, financial strain, decreasing reimbursement, new regulations, delivering bad news, fear of getting sued, and dealing with difficult patients, radiologists, and administrators. RESULTS: The overall response rate was 13.5% (312/2308). For those who opened the email, response rate was 24.6% (312/1269). The most prevalent stressors reported were working too fast (222/312, 71.2%), balancing demands of work with personal life (209/312, 70.0%), fear of getting sued (164/312, 52.6%), and dealing with difficult administrators (156/312, 50%). Prevalence of stress related to new regulation requirements, job security, financial strain, decreased reimbursement, dependent care, call, delivering bad news, and dealing with difficult patients, difficult referrers, and difficult radiologists were present in fewer than 50% of respondents. CONCLUSION: The most prevalent sources of stress in breast imaging radiologists relate to working too fast and balancing demands of work with time needed for personal life.

11.
J Educ Eval Health Prof ; 18: 9, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1308266

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Distance learning, which became widespread in response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, has been a burdensome challenge for students and lecturers. This study investigated the relationship between academic self-efficacy and burnout in first-year nursing students who participated in distance learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The study included 69 first-year nursing students at Jenderal Achmad Yani University in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Data were collected in September 2020 through self-efficacy and burnout questionnaires that were distributed via email and social media for 2 weeks. The responses were analyzed using the gamma test. RESULTS: Most respondents were women (78.3%), with an average age of 19 years. Most nursing students had a moderate level of academic self-efficacy (72.5%), while only 13.0% of respondents had a low level of academic self-efficacy. However, 46.4% of students experienced severe burnout during distance learning. Cross-tabulation showed that students with moderate self-efficacy were more likely to experience severe burnout (24 respondents) (P<0.01 and r=-0.884). Exhaustion was the burnout dimension most closely associated with academic self-efficacy. CONCLUSION: Students perceived distance learning as burdensome and reported high levels of exhaustion, which may negatively impact their academic achievement. Interventions to improve academic self-efficacy may foster students' confidence, potentially leading to reduced burnout levels. Nurse educators should reflect upon innovative learning strategies to create a favorable learning environment for nursing students.


Subject(s)
Academic Performance/psychology , Burnout, Psychological/psychology , COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Self Efficacy , Students, Nursing/psychology , Female , Humans , Indonesia , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
13.
PLoS One ; 16(6): e0253447, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1280630

ABSTRACT

Well-being is a major issue among health care professionals, especially physicians. Less job satisfaction and impaired health can have an impact on health care quality. Our aim was to examine the association of stressors (illegitimate tasks) and health related resources (work-related sense of coherence; recovery experience) with life satisfaction, happiness, job satisfaction and burnout among German general practitioners (GPs). We conducted a cross-sectional survey among general medical practices in Germany. Main outcome measures were life satisfaction, happiness (Subjective Happiness Scale), job satisfaction (Work Satisfaction Scale) and burnout (Copenhagen Burnout Inventory). 548 GPs from across Germany participated (53.6% males, 45.6% females; mostly representative of German GPs). One third (35.2%) of the participants reported a high prevalence of personal, and one quarter (26.5%) indicated a high prevalence of work-related burnout symptoms. Illegitimate tasks are negatively associated with life and job satisfaction and are positively associated with personal, work-related and patient-related burnout among GPs. Work-SoC and recovery experience are positively associated with life satisfaction, happiness, and job satisfaction and are negatively associated with personal, work-related and patient-related burnout. Female physicians have a higher job satisfaction than male physicians. Being female and working as an employed physician is associated with a higher prevalence of personal burnout symptoms. GPs working in a group practice are happier and more satisfied with their job than GPs in single practices. Personal, work-related and patient-related burnout symptoms are stronger in GPs working in a single practice than in GPs in group practices. Our results highlight that Work-SoC, recovery experience and illegitimate tasks are important for creating work-related well-being among GPs. Introducing health promotion activities which aim to strengthen recovery experience and Work-SoC, as well as interventions to restructure tasks, may increase life satisfaction, happiness, and job satisfaction and reduce burnout symptoms in this health care profession.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , General Practitioners/psychology , Happiness , Job Satisfaction , Personal Satisfaction , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
15.
Acad Psychiatry ; 45(5): 557-565, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269198

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Frontline workers have been a bulwark in the fight against COVID-19, while being subject to major unexpected stressors. These include conflicting news, evolving guidelines, perceived inadequate personal protective equipment, overflow of patients with rising death counts, absence of disaster training, and limitations in the implementation of social distancing. This study investigates the incidence and associated factors of depression, suicidal thoughts, and burnout among physicians during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: In a cross-sectional survey-based study of resident, fellow, and attending physicians from a tertiary university hospital during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic in New York from April 24 to May 15, 2020, demographics and practice specialty, attending vs. resident/fellow status, call frequency, emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and depression severity were examined. RESULTS: Two hundred twenty-five subjects completed the survey (response rate of 16.3%), with rates of 6.2% depression, 6.6% suicidal ideation, and 19.6% burnout. Depression, suicidal ideation, and burnout were all associated with history of prior depression/anxiety and frequency of on call. Suicidal ideation and burnout were also associated with younger age. There was no difference in rates of depression, suicidal ideation, or burnout between attending and resident physicians. Female physicians reported less work-life balance and more burnout. CONCLUSIONS: These findings highlight the importance of considering physician mental health during times of peak stress, such as natural or man-made disasters. The prominence of premorbid depression/anxiety as a relevant factor underscores the need to further understand physician mental health and provide early screening and treatment.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Physicians , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Suicidal Ideation , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
Nurs Educ Perspect ; 42(5): 285-290, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262246

ABSTRACT

AIM: The specific aim of the study was to describe nursing faculty experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic. BACKGROUND: Academic nursing experiences were disrupted due to the COVID-19 pandemic. There is concern that the resulting stress threatens nursing faculty emotional well-being. METHOD: A descriptive, quantitative study was conducted, exploring faculty academic and clinical roles during the COVID-19 pandemic, including perception of institutional support provided; faculty burnout, satisfaction, and well-being; and student support needs and well-being. RESULTS: Analyses were performed on 117 quantitative and 49 qualitative responses. Participants perceived support from academic institutions and increased need to provide emotional support to students. Most reported negative effects on well-being but did not report high levels of burnout. CONCLUSION: Nursing faculty are essential to the profession. Stress responses from the COVID-19 pandemic may not be fully realized. Nursing faculty require proactive and sustained institutional and personal support to provide exceptional ongoing education, build resilience, and support students.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Students, Nursing , Faculty, Nursing , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Kans J Med ; 14: 121-127, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259789

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Healthcare systems are being bombarded during the COVID-19 pandemic. Understanding burnout, compassion fatigue, and potential protective factors, such as compassion satisfaction, will be important in supporting the vital healthcare workforce. The goal of the current study was to understand the key factors of burnout, compassion fatigue, and compassion satisfaction among healthcare employees during the pandemic within the U.S. in April 2020. METHODS: The authors conducted a single-center, cross-sectional online survey using the Professional Quality of Life (ProQOL) Questionnaire and three open-ended questions around stress and responses to stress during COVID-19 at a large Midwestern academic medical center with nearly 16,000 employees. RESULTS: Healthcare employees (613) representing over 25 professions or roles and 30 different departments within the health system were surveyed. Participants reported low levels of compassion fatigue and burnout, but moderate levels of compassion satisfaction. Compassion satisfaction was notably higher than prior literature. Key areas of stress outside of work included family, finances and housing, childcare and homeschooling, and personal health. CONCLUSIONS: This was a cross-sectional survey, limiting causal analyses. Also, based on the qualitative responses, the ProQOL was somewhat insufficient in assessing the breadth of stressors, particularly outside of work, that healthcare employees faced due to the pandemic. Although compassion satisfaction was elevated during the initial phases of the pandemic, providing some possible protection against burnout, this may change as COVID-19 continues to surge. Healthcare systems are encouraged to assess and address the broad range of work and non-work-related stressors to best serve their vital workforce.

18.
J Am Board Fam Med ; 34(3): 522-530, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259318

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 has spread rapidly, with vast global implications. This study assessed how family physicians in Kansas were responding to COVID-19 and the effects of the pandemic on their well-being. METHODS: The authors conducted a cross-sectional survey of 113 family physicians in Kansas between May 22, 2020 and June 25, 2020. The study participants completed an anonymous, 36-item survey assessing their concerns about being exposed to COVID-19 and levels of personal depression, anxiety, stress, and burnout in addition to demographic information. RESULTS: There was a 45.6% response rate, with 50.4% (n = 57) of the respondents reporting manifestations of burnout. The physicians who personally treated any presumptive or confirmed COVID-19 patient, compared with those who did not, were more likely to report at least 1 manifestation of burnout, experience emotional exhaustion, and feel a higher level of personal stress. CONCLUSION: Our findings demonstrate that the COVID-19 pandemic may be taking an emotional toll on family physicians in Kansas. This study provides a baseline from which to continue further monitoring of outcomes. Data can help drive initiatives at local, state, and national levels to help diminish the negative impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on physicians.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , Burnout, Professional , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Physicians, Family/psychology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Kansas/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
JMIR Med Inform ; 9(6): e28497, 2021 Jun 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1256269

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic spread worldwide in 2020. Notably, in the countries dealing with massive casualties, clinicians have worked in new conditions characterized by a heavy workload and a high risk of being infected. The issue of clinician burnout during the pandemic has attracted considerable attention in health care research. Electronic health records (EHRs) provide health care workers with several features to meet a health system's clinical needs. OBJECTIVE: We aim to examine how the use of EHR features affects the burnout of clinicians working in hospitals that have special wards for confirmed COVID-19 cases. METHODS: Using an online survey, we collected data from 368 physicians, physician assistants, and nurses working in six hospitals that have implemented EHRs in the city of Tehran in Iran. We used logistic regression to assess the association between burnout and awareness of EHR features, EHR system usability, concerns about COVID-19, technology solutions, hospital technology interventions, hospital preparedness, and professional efficacy adjusted for demographic and practice characteristics. RESULTS: The primary outcome of our study was self-reported burnout during the COVID-19 pandemic. Of the 368 respondents, 36% (n=134) reported having at least one symptom of burnout. Participants indicated that the leading cause of EHR-related stress is inadequate training for using technology (n=159, 43%), followed by having less face-to-face time with patients (n=140, 38%). Positive perceptions about the EHR's ease of use were associated with lower odds of burnout symptoms. More interventions, such as clear communication of regulations; transparency in policies, expectations, and goals regarding the use of technology in the clinical workflow; and hospital preparedness to cope with the challenges of the pandemic, were associated with lower odds of burnout. CONCLUSIONS: The use of EHR applications, hospital pandemic preparation programs, and transparent technology-related policies and procedures throughout the epidemic can be substantial mitigators of technology-based stress and clinician burnout. Hospitals will then be better positioned to devise or modify technology-related policies and procedures to support physicians' and nurses' well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic. Training programs, transparency in communications of regulations, and developing a clear channel for informing clinicians of changes in policies may help reduce burnout symptoms among physicians and nurses during a pandemic. Providing easily accessible mentorship through teleconsultation and 24-hour available information technology support may also help to mitigate the odds of burnout.

20.
Telemed J E Health ; 28(3): 391-398, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1254373

ABSTRACT

Introduction: To adapt during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, a large safety-net hospital in Atlanta, Georgia and other hospitals across the United Sates, increased telemedicine (TM) for outpatient visits. The impact on resident physicians, including minority providers, had not yet been reported. We aimed to assess how primary care residents perceived increased TM in clinics during the pandemic, and assess resident burnout. Materials and Methods: An online survey was sent to 60 internal medicine (IM) and 18 family medicine (FM) residents who used TM to treat underserved patients, from March to May 2020, at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. The questionnaire included questions on resident demographics, satisfaction with TM, screening capability for COVID-19, effectiveness for patient education on COVID-19, impact on patient interactions and time management. Burnout was assessed with the Abbreviated Maslach Burnout Inventory. Results: A majority (62 of 78) eligible residents (79.5%) responded to the survey. Ninety-one percent of residents agreed that TM was a secure alternative to face-to-face encounters. Seventy-nine percent used it to screen for signs/symptoms of COVID-19 and 93% provided patient education on COVID-19. Average visit length decreased by 10-20 min with TM. Post-TM, scores for overall burnout were decreased (p = 0.0003) and less residents in total exhibited burnout (p = 0.0156). Discussion and Conclusions: IM and FM residents viewed TM as an efficient way to screen for and provide education on COVID-19, as well as a secure alternative to face-to-face encounters. With increased used of TM during COVID-19, there was decreased burnout among primary care residents.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Telemedicine , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics
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