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1.
Hum Resour Health ; 19(1): 64, 2021 05 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1225777

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic posed a huge challenge to the education systems worldwide, forcing many countries to provisionally close educational institutions and deliver courses fully online. The aim of this study was to explore the quality of the online education in China for international medical and nursing students from low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) as well as the factors that influenced their satisfaction with online education during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Questionnaires were developed and administered to 316 international medical and nursing students and 120 teachers at a university in China. The Chi-square test was used to detect the influence of participants' personal characteristics on their satisfaction with online education. The Kruskal-Wallis rank-sum test was employed to identify the negative and positive factors influencing the online education satisfaction. A binary logistic regression model was performed for multiple-factor analysis to determine the association of the different categories of influential factors-crisis-, learner-, instructor-, and course-related categories, with the online education satisfaction. RESULTS: Overall, 230 students (response rate 72.8%) and 95 teachers (response rate 79.2%) completed the survey. It was found that 36.5% of students and 61.1% of teachers were satisfied with the online education. Teachers' professional title, students' year of study, continent of origin and location of current residence significantly influenced the online education satisfaction. The most influential barrier for students was the severity of the COVID-19 situation and for teachers it was the sense of distance. The most influential facilitating factor for students was a well-accomplished course assignment and for teachers it was the successful administration of the online courses. CONCLUSIONS: Several key factors have been identified that affected the attitudes of international health science students from LMICs and their teachers towards online education in China during the COVID-19 pandemic. To improve the online education outcome, medical schools are advised to promote the facilitating factors and cope with the barriers, by providing support for students and teaching faculties to deal with the anxiety caused by the pandemic, caring for the state of mind of in-China students away from home, maintaining the engagement of out-China students studying from afar and enhancing collaborations with overseas institutions to create practice opportunities at students' local places.


Subject(s)
Attitude , COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Medical/methods , Education, Nursing/methods , Faculty , Students , Adolescent , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , Developing Countries , Faculty, Medical , Faculty, Nursing , Female , Humans , Internet , Male , Nurses , Pandemics , Physicians , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Medical , Students, Nursing , Young Adult
2.
Methods Inf Med ; 59(6): 183-192, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1223130

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As a major public health crisis, the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic demonstrates the urgent need for safe, effective, and evidence-based implementations of digital health. The urgency stems from the frequent tendency to focus attention on seemingly high promising digital health interventions despite being poorly validated in times of crisis. AIM: In this paper, we describe a joint call for action to use and leverage evidence-based health informatics as the foundation for the COVID-19 response and public health interventions. Tangible examples are provided for how the working groups and special interest groups of the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA) are helping to build an evidence-based response to this crisis. METHODS: Leaders of working and special interest groups of the IMIA, a total of 26 groups, were contacted via e-mail to provide a summary of the scientific-based efforts taken to combat COVID-19 pandemic and participate in the discussion toward the creation of this manuscript. A total of 13 groups participated in this manuscript. RESULTS: Various efforts were exerted by members of IMIA including (1) developing evidence-based guidelines for the design and deployment of digital health solutions during COVID-19; (2) surveying clinical informaticians internationally about key digital solutions deployed to combat COVID-19 and the challenges faced when implementing and using them; and (3) offering necessary resources for clinicians about the use of digital tools in clinical practice, education, and research during COVID-19. DISCUSSION: Rigor and evidence need to be taken into consideration when designing, implementing, and using digital tools to combat COVID-19 to avoid delays and unforeseen negative consequences. It is paramount to employ a multidisciplinary approach for the development and implementation of digital health tools that have been rapidly deployed in response to the pandemic bearing in mind human factors, ethics, data privacy, and the diversity of context at the local, national, and international levels. The training and capacity building of front-line workers is crucial and must be linked to a clear strategy for evaluation of ongoing experiences.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Evidence-Based Practice , Medical Informatics , Cooperative Behavior , Humans , Pandemics , Public Health , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 9(5)2021 Apr 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1202188

ABSTRACT

This study aims to understand public discussions regarding COVID-19 vaccine on Parler, a newer social media platform that recently gained in popularity. Through analyzing a random sample (n = 400) of Parler posts using the hashtags #COVID19Vaccine and #NoCovidVaccine, we use the concept of echo chambers to understand users' discussions through a text analytics approach. Thematic analysis reveals five key themes: reasons to refuse the COVID-19 vaccine (40%), side effects of the COVID-19 vaccine (28%), population control through the COVID-19 vaccine (23%), children getting vaccinated without parental consent (5%), and comparison of other health issues with COVID-19 (2%). Textual analysis shows that the most frequently used words in the corpus were: nocovidvaccine (348); vaccine (264); covid (184); covid19 (157); and vaccines (128). These findings suggest that users adopted different terms and hashtags to express their beliefs regarding the COVID-19 vaccine. Further, findings revealed that users used certain hashtags such as "echo" to encourage like-minded people to reinforce their existing beliefs on COVID-19 vaccine efficacy and vaccine acceptance. These findings have implications for public health communication in attempts to correct false narratives on social media platforms. Through widely sharing the scientific findings of COVID-19 vaccine-related studies can help individuals understand the COVID-19 vaccines efficacy accurately.

4.
J Infect Chemother ; 27(7): 1092-1096, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1157498

ABSTRACT

A new inflammatory disease has emerged in children after the COVID-19 disease and has been named multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C). We report a case of cervical abscess in an infant with COVID-19 who was first considered to have MIS-C due to persistent fever, high inflammatory markers. A 10-month-old boy was admitted to the emergency department due to a 3-day fever and cervical lymphadenopathy. SARS-CoV-2 RNA was detected by a real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction in the nasopharyngeal swab specimen of the patient. Regarding initial clinical and laboratory findings, the patient was diagnosed to have MIS-C and bacterial co-infection. Clindamycin and ceftriaxone treatments were initiated for bacterial co-infection. Despite treatment, his fever persisted and acute phase reactants compatible with MIS-C were elevated and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) was administered. After IVIG treatment, his fever persisted and the patient developed local inflammatory signs including erythema, tenderness, fluctuation developed. Cervical ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated the findings compatible with the cervical abscess. Drainage of the cervical abscess was performed by an otolaryngologist. Methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from the abscess culture. After abscess drainage, fever and acute phase reactants declined. His nasopharyngeal swab was negative for SARS-CoV-2 on the 7th day. He was discharged on the 21st day of hospitalization with full recovery. To the best of our knowledge, no cases of COVID-19 with cervical abscess caused by Staphylococcus aureus in children had been reported previously. Bacterial co-infection should be kept in mind in children infected with SARS-CoV-2 and showing MIS-C findings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Abscess/diagnosis , Abscess/drug therapy , Child , Humans , Infant , Male , Methicillin , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2 , Staphylococcus aureus , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome
5.
Rheumatology (Oxford) ; 60(8): 3496-3502, 2021 08 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1132572

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccination will be the largest vaccination programme in the history of the NHS. Patients on immunosuppressive therapy will be among the earliest to be vaccinated. Some evidence indicates immunosuppressive therapy inhibits humoral response to the influenza, pneumococcal and hepatitis B vaccines. The degree to which this will translate to impaired COVID-19 vaccine responses is unclear. Other evidence suggests withholding MTX for 2 weeks post-vaccination may improve responses. Rituximab has been shown to impair humoral responses for 6 months or longer post-administration. Decisions on withholding or interrupting immunosuppressive therapy around COVID-19 vaccination will need to be made prior to the availability of data on specific COVID-19 vaccine response in these patients. With this in mind, this article outlines the existing data on the effect of antirheumatic therapy on vaccine responses in patients with inflammatory arthritis and formulates a possible pragmatic management strategy for COVID-19 vaccination.


Subject(s)
Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccination/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans
7.
Mindfulness (N Y) ; 11(6): 1520-1526, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-935333

ABSTRACT

The body is a central object of the cultivation of mindfulness, in the way this has been described in relevant Pali discourses and their parallels. At the background of such cultivation stands the absence of positing a mind-body duality and a lack of concern with a particular physical location of the mind in early Buddhist thought. Moreover, the various exercises that involve directing mindfulness to the body need to be considered in conjunction in order to arrive at a balanced understanding of their overarching purpose. Out of the different possible modalities of cultivating mindfulness in this way, the discourses present awareness directed to one's own bodily postures as a practice already undertaken by the Buddha-to-be when he was still in quest of awakening. In this particular setting, such mindfulness of postures served as a way of facing fear. The potential of this exercise to provide a grounding in embodied mindfulness, being fully in the here and now, is of particular relevance to the challenges posed by the current pandemic.

8.
Curr Psychol ; : 1-12, 2020 Oct 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-911956

ABSTRACT

To date, despite the great debate regarding the best seating arrangement for learning in classrooms, no empirical studies have examined the direct effects of different seating arrangements on children's cognitive processes. This is particularly important nowadays that the COVID-19 measures include maintaining distance in the classroom. Aim of this study was experimentally investigating the effect of changing the seating arrangement (clusters vs. single desks), on logical reasoning, creativity and theory of mind, in children attending primary school. Furthermore, some individual characteristics (e.g., gender, loneliness, popularity) were analysed as potential moderators. Results on 77 participants showed that, when children were seated in single desks, their score in logical reasoning was globally higher. Furthermore, when seated in single desks, girls showed a better performance in the theory of mind, and lonelier children performed better in theory of mind and creativity. This on field experimental study suggests the importance of considering both the nature of the task and children's individual characteristics when deciding on a seating arrangement in the classroom.

9.
J Clin Med Res ; 12(7): 458-461, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-643250

ABSTRACT

Respiratory failure is presumptively caused by microvascular thrombosis in some patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) requiring therapeutic anticoagulation. Anticoagulation treatment may cause life-threatening bleeding complications such as retroperitoneal hemorrhage. To the best of our knowledge, we report first case of a COVID-19 patient treated with therapeutic anticoagulation resulting in psoas hematoma due to lumbar artery bleeding. A 69-year-old patient presented with fever, malaise and progressive shortness of breath to our hospital. He was diagnosed with COVID-19 by RT-PCR. Due to an abnormal coagulation profile, the patient was started on enoxaparin. Over the course of hospitalization, the patient was found to have hypotension with worsening hemoglobin levels. Computed tomography scan of the abdomen and pelvis revealed a large psoas hematoma. Arteriogram revealed lumbar artery bleeding which was treated with embolization. Anticoagulation therapy, while indicated in COVID-19 patients, has its own challenges and guidelines describing dosages and indications in this disease are lacking. Rare bleeding complications such as psoas hematoma should be kept in mind in patients who become hemodynamically unstable, warranting prompt imaging for diagnosis and treatment with arterial embolization, thus eliminating need of surgical intervention.

10.
J Nutr Health Aging ; 24(6): 550-559, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-245005

ABSTRACT

COVID 19 is much more than an infectious disease by SARS-CoV-2 followed by a disproportionate immune response. An older age, diabetes and history of cardiovascular disease, especially hypertension, but also chronic heart failure and coronary artery disease among others, are between the most important risk factors. In addition, during the hospitalization both hyperglycaemia and heart failure are frequent. Less frequent are acute coronary syndrome, arrhythmias and stroke. Accordingly, not all prolonged stays or even deaths are due directly to SARS-CoV-2. To our knowledge, this is the first review, focusing both on cardiovascular and metabolic aspects of this dreadful disease, in an integrated and personalized way, following the guidelines of the Cardiometabolic Health/Medicine. Therefore, current personalized aspects such as ACEIs and ARBs, the place of statins and the most appropriate management of heart failure in diabetics are analysed. Aging, better than old age, as a dynamic process, is also considered in this review for the first time in the literature, and not only as a risk factor attributed to cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular comorbidities. Immunosenescence is also approached to build healthier elders, so they can resist present and future infectious diseases, and not only in epidemics or pandemics. In addition, to do this we must start knowing the molecular mechanisms that underlying Aging process in general, and immunosenescence in particular. Surprisingly, the endoplasmic reticulum stress and autophagy are implicated in both process. Finally, with a training in all the aspects covered in this review, not only the hospital stay, complications and costs of this frightening disease in high-risk population should be reduced. Likely, this paper will open a gate to the future for open-minded physicians.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Cardiovascular Diseases/etiology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Aged , Aging , COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/etiology , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Precision Medicine , SARS-CoV-2
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