Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 14 de 14
Filter
1.
Pharm Biol ; 59(1): 696-703, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263613

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT: COVID-19 is a novel coronavirus that causes a severe infection in the respiratory system. Nigella sativa L. (Ranunculaceae) is an annual flowering plant used traditionally as a natural food supplement and multipurpose medicinal agent. OBJECTIVE: The possible beneficial effects of N. sativa, and its constituent, thymoquinone (TQ) on COVID-19 were reviewed. METHODS: The key words including, COVID-19, N. sativa, thymoquinone, antiviral effects, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects in different databases such as Web of Science (ISI), PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar were searched from 1990 up to February 2021. RESULTS: The current literature review showed that N. sativa and TQ reduced the level of pro-inflammatory mediators including, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, and IL-12, while enhancing IFN-γ. Nigella sativa and TQ increased the serum levels of IgG1 and IgG2a, and improved pulmonary function tests in restrictive respiratory disorders. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: These preliminary data of molecular docking, animal, and clinical studies propose N. sativa and TQ might have beneficial effects on the treatment or control of COVID-19 due to antiviral, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties as well as bronchodilatory effects. The efficacy of N. sativa and TQ on infected patients with COVID-19 in randomize clinical trials will be suggested.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Benzoquinones/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Nigella sativa , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/isolation & purification , Antiviral Agents/isolation & purification , Benzoquinones/isolation & purification , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cytokines/metabolism , Humans , Immune System/drug effects , Immune System/immunology , Immune System/metabolism , Immune System/virology , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Lung/drug effects , Lung/immunology , Lung/metabolism , Lung/virology , Nigella sativa/chemistry , Plant Extracts/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
2.
Front Pediatr ; 9: 673322, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259359

ABSTRACT

As the COVID-19 pandemic is still evolving, guidelines on pulmonary function testing that may dynamically adapt to sudden epidemiologic changes are required. This paper presents the recommendations of the Hellenic Pediatric Respiratory Society (HPRS) on pulmonary function testing in children and adolescents during the COVID-19 era. Following an extensive review of the relevant literature, we recommend that pulmonary function tests should be carried out after careful evaluation of the epidemiologic load, structured clinical screening of all candidates, and application of special protective measures to minimize the risk of viral cross infection. These principles have been integrated into a dynamic action plan that may readily adapt to the phase of the pandemic.

3.
JAMA ; 325(15): 1525-1534, 2021 04 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1222575

ABSTRACT

Importance: Little is known about long-term sequelae of COVID-19. Objective: To describe the consequences at 4 months in patients hospitalized for COVID-19. Design, Setting, and Participants: In a prospective uncontrolled cohort study, survivors of COVID-19 who had been hospitalized in a university hospital in France between March 1 and May 29, 2020, underwent a telephone assessment 4 months after discharge, between July 15 and September 18, 2020. Patients with relevant symptoms and all patients hospitalized in an intensive care unit (ICU) were invited for further assessment at an ambulatory care visit. Exposures: Survival of hospitalization for COVID-19. Main Outcomes and Measures: Respiratory, cognitive, and functional symptoms were assessed by telephone with the Q3PC cognitive screening questionnaire and a checklist of symptoms. At the ambulatory care visit, patients underwent pulmonary function tests, lung computed tomographic scan, psychometric and cognitive tests (including the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey and 20-item Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory), and, for patients who had been hospitalized in the ICU or reported ongoing symptoms, echocardiography. Results: Among 834 eligible patients, 478 were evaluated by telephone (mean age, 61 years [SD, 16 years]; 201 men, 277 women). During the telephone interview, 244 patients (51%) declared at least 1 symptom that did not exist before COVID-19: fatigue in 31%, cognitive symptoms in 21%, and new-onset dyspnea in 16%. There was further evaluation in 177 patients (37%), including 97 of 142 former ICU patients. The median 20-item Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory score (n = 130) was 4.5 (interquartile range, 3.0-5.0) for reduced motivation and 3.7 (interquartile range, 3.0-4.5) for mental fatigue (possible range, 1 [best] to 5 [worst]). The median 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey score (n = 145) was 25 (interquartile range, 25.0-75.0) for the subscale "role limited owing to physical problems" (possible range, 0 [best] to 100 [worst]). Computed tomographic lung-scan abnormalities were found in 108 of 171 patients (63%), mainly subtle ground-glass opacities. Fibrotic lesions were observed in 33 of 171 patients (19%), involving less than 25% of parenchyma in all but 1 patient. Fibrotic lesions were observed in 19 of 49 survivors (39%) with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Among 94 former ICU patients, anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic symptoms were observed in 23%, 18%, and 7%, respectively. The left ventricular ejection fraction was less than 50% in 8 of 83 ICU patients (10%). New-onset chronic kidney disease was observed in 2 ICU patients. Serology was positive in 172 of 177 outpatients (97%). Conclusions and Relevance: Four months after hospitalization for COVID-19, a cohort of patients frequently reported symptoms not previously present, and lung-scan abnormalities were common among those who were tested. These findings are limited by the absence of a control group and of pre-COVID assessments in this cohort. Further research is needed to understand longer-term outcomes and whether these findings reflect associations with the disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Hospitalization , Lung Diseases/etiology , Lung/pathology , Aged , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/psychology , Cognition Disorders/etiology , Cohort Studies , Depression/etiology , Dyspnea/etiology , Fatigue/etiology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Lung Diseases/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
4.
Int J Clin Pract ; 75(7): e14237, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1189691

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) rapidly escalated from its origin in an animal market in Wuhan, China in December 2019 to a global pandemic, and the lungs are the most frequently affected organ. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between pulmonary function test parameters and laboratory parameters in COVID-19. METHOD: A total of 60 patients who were admitted to the chest diseases department and intensive care unit of our hospital and were diagnosed with COVID-19 by real-time PCR analysis of nasopharyngeal swabs were evaluated. Pulmonary function tests and laboratory parameters at admission and on day 7 of treatment were analysed. RESULTS: On day 7 of treatment, white blood cell count, CRP, and fibrinogen level were significantly lower than at admission (P = .002, 0.001, and 0.001, respectively), while forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1 ) and forced vital capacity (FVC) values were significantly higher compared with admitting values (P = .001 for both). Correlation analysis showed that the decrease in CRP from admission to day 7 of treatment correlated with the increase in FEV1 (r = 0.616, P = .01) and FVC (r = 0.51, P = .01) during the same period. A decrease in the fibrinogen level was also correlated with an increase in FEV1 (r = 0.345, P = .01) and FVC (r = 0.357, P = .01). CONCLUSION: Fibrinogen and CRP levels are easily accessible parameters that may help identify improvement or deterioration in pulmonary function in COVID-19 patients during follow-up and discharge while reducing the risk of transmission.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , China , Humans , Laboratories , Respiratory Function Tests , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Res Pract Thromb Haemost ; 4(6): 984-996, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1184616

ABSTRACT

Background: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused a large surge of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Prior phase I trials (non-COVID-19) demonstrated improvement in pulmonary function in patients ARDS using fibrinolytic therapy. A follow-up trial using the widely available tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) alteplase is now needed to assess optimal dosing and safety in this critically ill patient population. Objective: To describe the design and rationale of a phase IIa trial to evaluate the safety and efficacy of alteplase treatment for moderate/severe COVID-19-induced ARDS. Patients/Methods: A rapidly adaptive, pragmatic, open-label, randomized, controlled, phase IIa clinical trial will be conducted with 3 groups: intravenous alteplase 50 mg, intravenous alteplase 100 mg, and control (standard-of-care). Inclusion criteria are known/suspected COVID-19 infection with PaO2/FiO2 ratio <150 mm Hg for > 4 hours despite maximal mechanical ventilation management. Alteplase will be delivered through an initial bolus of 50 mg or 100 mg followed by heparin infusion for systemic anticoagulation, with alteplase redosing if there is a >20% PaO2/FiO2 improvement not sustained by 24 hours. Results: The primary outcome is improvement in PaO2/FiO2 at 48 hours after randomization. Other outcomes include ventilator- and intensive care unit-free days, successful extubation (no reintubation ≤3 days after initial extubation), and mortality. Fifty eligible patients will be enrolled in a rapidly adaptive, modified stepped-wedge design with 4 looks at the data. Conclusion: Findings will provide timely information on the safety, efficacy, and optimal dosing of t-PA to treat moderate/severe COVID-19-induced ARDS, which can be rapidly adapted to a phase III trial (NCT04357730; FDA IND 149634).

6.
Can Respir J ; 2021: 6692409, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1093889

ABSTRACT

We aimed to investigate changes in pulmonary function and computed tomography (CT) findings in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) during the recovery period. COVID-19 patients underwent symptom assessment, pulmonary function tests, and high-resolution chest CT 6 months after discharge from the hospital. Of the 54 patients enrolled, 31 and 23 were in the moderate and severe group, respectively. The main symptoms 6 months after discharge were fatigue and exertional dyspnea, experienced by 24.1% and 18.5% of patients, respectively, followed by smell and taste dysfunction (9.3%) and cough (5.6%). One patient dropped out of the pulmonary function tests. Of the remaining 54 patients, 41.5% had pulmonary dysfunction. Specifically, 7.5% presented with restrictive ventilatory dysfunction (forced vital capacity <80% of the predicted value), 18.9% presented with small airway dysfunction, and 32.1% presented with pulmonary diffusion impairment (diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide <80% of the predicted value). Of the 54 patients enrolled, six patients dropped out of the chest CT tests. Eleven of the remaining 48 patients presented with abnormal lung CT findings 6 months after discharge. Patients with residual lung lesions were more common in the severe group (52.6%) than in the moderate group (3.4%); a higher proportion of patients had involvement of both lungs (42.1% vs. 3.4%) in the severe group. The residual lung lesions were mainly ground-glass opacities (20.8%) and linear opacities (14.6%). Semiquantitative visual scoring of the CT findings revealed significantly higher scores in the left, right, and both lungs in the severe group than in the moderate group. COVID-19 patients 6 months after discharge mostly presented with fatigue and exertional dyspnea, and their pulmonary dysfunction was mostly characterized by pulmonary diffusion impairment. As revealed by chest CT, the severe group had a higher prevalence of residual lesions than the moderate group, and the residual lesions mostly manifested as ground-glass opacities and linear opacities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Fatigue/physiopathology , Lung/physiopathology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Cough/physiopathology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Forced Expiratory Volume , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Olfaction Disorders/physiopathology , Peak Expiratory Flow Rate , Pulmonary Diffusing Capacity , Recovery of Function , Respiratory Function Tests , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Taste Disorders/physiopathology , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Vital Capacity
7.
EClinicalMedicine ; 32: 100731, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1051602

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Short-term follow-up of COVID-19 patients reveals pulmonary dysfunction, myocardial damage and severe psychological distress. Little is known of the burden of these sequelae, and there are no clear recommendations for follow-up of COVID-19 patients.In this multi-disciplinary evaluation, cardiopulmonary function and psychological impairment after hospitalization for COVID-19 are mapped. METHODS: We evaluated patients at our outpatient clinic 6 weeks after discharge. Cardiopulmonary function was measured by echocardiography, 24-hours ECG monitoring and pulmonary function testing. Psychological adjustment was measured using questionnaires and semi-structured clinical interviews. A comparison was made between patients admitted to the general ward and Intensive care unit (ICU), and between patients with a high versus low functional status. FINDINGS: Eighty-one patients were included of whom 34 (41%) had been admitted to the ICU. New York Heart Association class II-III was present in 62% of the patients. Left ventricular function was normal in 78% of patients. ICU patients had a lower diffusion capacity (mean difference 12,5% P = 0.01), lower forced expiratory volume in one second and forced vital capacity (mean difference 14.9%; P<0.001; 15.4%; P<0.001; respectively). Risk of depression, anxiety and PTSD were 17%, 5% and 10% respectively and similar for both ICU and non-ICU patients. INTERPRETATION: Overall, most patients suffered from functional limitations. Dyspnea on exertion was most frequently reported, possibly related to decreased DLCOc. This could be caused by pulmonary fibrosis, which should be investigated in long-term follow-up. In addition, mechanical ventilation, deconditioning, or pulmonary embolism may play an important role.

8.
Ann Intensive Care ; 10(1): 151, 2020 Nov 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-992558

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In COVID-19 patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), the relatively preserved respiratory system compliance despite severe hypoxemia, with specific pulmonary vascular dysfunction, suggests a possible hemodynamic mechanism for VA/Q mismatch, as hypoxic vasoconstriction alteration. This study aimed to evaluate the capacity of inhaled nitric oxide (iNO)-almitrine combination to restore oxygenation in severe COVID-19 ARDS (C-ARDS) patients. METHODS: We conducted a monocentric preliminary pilot study in intubated patients with severe C-ARDS. Respiratory mechanics was assessed after a prone session. Then, patients received iNO (10 ppm) alone and in association with almitrine (10 µg/kg/min) during 30 min in each step. Echocardiographic and blood gases measurements were performed at baseline, during iNO alone, and iNO-almitrine combination. The primary endpoint was the variation of oxygenation (PaO2/FiO2 ratio). RESULTS: Ten severe C-ARDS patients were assessed (7 males and 3 females), with a median age of 60 [52-72] years. Combination of iNO and almitrine outperformed iNO alone for oxygenation improvement. The median of PaO2/FiO2 ratio varied from 102 [89-134] mmHg at baseline, to 124 [108-146] mmHg after iNO (p = 0.13) and 180 [132-206] mmHg after iNO and almitrine (p < 0.01). We found no correlation between the increase in oxygenation caused by iNO-almitrine combination and that caused by proning. CONCLUSION: In this pilot study of severe C-ARDS patients, iNO-almitrine combination was associated with rapid and significant improvement of oxygenation. These findings highlight the role of pulmonary vascular function in COVID-19 pathophysiology.

9.
Pharmaceuticals (Basel) ; 13(12)2020 Nov 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-948895

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 infection is associated with pulmonary coagulopathy, which determines the deposition of fibrin in the air spaces and lung parenchyma. The resulting lung lesions compromise patient pulmonary function and increase mortality, or end in permanent lung damage for those who have recovered from the COVID-19 disease. Therefore, local pulmonary fibrinolysis can be efficacious in degrading pre-existing fibrin clots and reducing the conversion of lung lesions into lasting scars. Plasminogen is considered a key player in fibrinolysis processes, and in view of a bench-to-bedside translation, we focused on the aerosolization of an orphan medicinal product (OMP) for ligneous conjunctivitis: human plasminogen (PLG-OMP) eye drops. As such, the sterile and preservative-free solution guarantees the pharmaceutical quality of GMP production and meets the Ph. Eur. requirements of liquid preparations for nebulization. PLG-OMP aerosolization was evaluated both from technological and stability viewpoints, after being submitted to either jet or ultrasonic nebulization. Jet nebulization resulted in a more efficient delivery of an aerosol suitable for pulmonary deposition. The biochemical investigation highlighted substantial protein integrity maintenance with the percentage of native plasminogen band > 90%, in accordance with the quality specifications of PLG-OMP. In a coherent way, the specific activity of plasminogen is maintained within the range 4.8-5.6 IU/mg (PLG-OMP pre-nebulization: 5.0 IU/mg). This is the first study that focuses on the technological and biochemical aspects of aerosolized plasminogen, which could affect both treatment efficacy and clinical dosage delivery. Increasing evidence for the need of local fibrinolytic therapy could merge with the availability of PLG-OMP as an easy handling solution, readily aerosolizable for a fast translation into an extended clinical efficacy assessment in COVID-19 patients.

10.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(38): e22041, 2020 Sep 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-787419

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Qigong is a traditional Chinese exercise method for health care, keeping fit and getting rid of diseases. It has the advantages of simple operation and few side effects. Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an acute respiratory infectious disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2(SARS-COV-2). Its clinical manifestations mainly include fever, fatigue, and dry cough. Clinical practice showed that Qigong had some therapeutic effects on pulmonary dysfunction caused by novel Coronavirus, but there was lacking in evidence of evidence-based medicine. The purpose of this protocol is to systematically evaluate the effects of Qigong on lung function and quality of life in COVID-19 patients, and to add evidence to evidence-based medicine for the clinical application of Qigong therapy. METHODS: Use computer to retrieve English database (PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library) and Chinese database (China Knowledge Network (CNKI), Wanfang Database, VIP Information Chinese Journal Service Platform (VIP), Chinese Biomedical Database). In addition, we manually retrieve randomized controlled clinical research from Baidu academic and Google academic from its establishment to July 2020. Two researchers independently extracted and evaluated the quality of the data included in the study, using RevMan5.3 to do meta-analyses of articles included, without language restrictions. RESULTS: This research evaluated the effectiveness and safety of Qigongs influence on patients pulmonary function and life quality by index such as 6-minute walk distance (6MWD), Forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), Forced vital capacity (FVC), Forced expiratory volume in 1 second/Forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC), Forced expiratory volume in 1 second/prediction (FEV1/PRE), Self-rating anxiety scale (SAS), etc. CONCLUSIONS:: This study will provide reliable evidence-based evidence for the clinical application of Qigong in the treatment of COVID-19. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42020191877.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Medicine, Chinese Traditional/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Qigong/methods , Quality of Life , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Lung/physiopathology , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Research Design , Respiratory Function Tests , SARS-CoV-2 , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Treatment Outcome
11.
Clin Neuropsychol ; 34(7-8): 1480-1497, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-744460

ABSTRACT

Objective: The illness resulting from Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), better known as COVID-19, has quickly escalated to a worldwide pandemic. Although understanding of the short and long-term manifestations of COVID-19 remains incomplete, there is a preponderance of respiratory pathology in COVID-19 and potential for chronic loss of pulmonary function in recovered patients, raising concerns for associated cognitive impacts.Method: We conducted a narrative review of the existing literature on neuropsychological variables in acute/severe respiratory disease and various forms of chronic pulmonary disease to inform expectations about potential cognitive manifestations of COVID-19.Results: Cognitive dysfunction is common but not inevitable in acute and chronic pulmonary disease, although unique predictors and symptom trajectories appear to be associated with each.Conclusions: Although the full scope of neuropathophysiology associated with COVID-19 remains to be established, pulmonary insults associated with the disease are likely to produce cognitive dysfunction in a substantial percentage of patients.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Lung Diseases/epidemiology , Lung Diseases/psychology , Neuropsychology/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Acute Disease , COVID-19 , Chronic Disease , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Humans , Lung Diseases/therapy , Neuropsychological Tests , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Trials ; 21(1): 751, 2020 Aug 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-733026

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In December 2019, pneumonia associated with the 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) emerged in Wuhan, China. The number of cases has increased rapidly. Patients with severe disease have a poor prognosis, and there are no effective therapies for COVID-19. Only rapid advice guidelines for symptomatic supportive care have been used. A traditional Chinese medicine rehabilitation (TCMR) program consisting of acupressure therapy and Liu Zi Jue Qigong can be used as a complementary therapy for COVID-19. Hence, we designed a randomized trial to evaluate the efficacy and advantages of TCMR for treating patients with severe COVID-19. METHODS/DESIGN: This is a parallel-design, two-arm, analyst assessor-blinded, randomized controlled trial. A total of 128 patients with COVID-19 aged from 20 to 80 years will be recruited and assigned randomly into a guideline therapy group and a guideline therapy plus TCMR group at a 1:1 ratio. Patients in both groups will receive guideline therapy. The patients in the intervention group will perform acupressure therapy and Liu Zi Jue Qigong exercises in addition to conventional treatments twice a day and will be persistent from admission to discharge. The primary outcome will be measured with the Modified Medical Research Council Dyspnea Scale, and the secondary outcomes will include the Activities of Daily Living Barthel Index Scale, Patient Health Questionnaire-9 Scale, and the Respiratory Symptoms Scale. The assessments of the clinical scales will be performed at three points (before treatment, the 7th day during hospitalization, and the discharge day). Adverse events will be noted and recorded for the safety evaluation. DISCUSSION: This trial will provide high-quality evidence of the value of TCMR, which consists of acupressure therapy and Liu Zi Jue Qigong exercises, for treating patients with severe COVID-19. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Chinese Clinical Trial Registry ChiCTR2000029994 . Registered on 18 February 2020.


Subject(s)
Acupressure/methods , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Dyspnea/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Qigong/methods , Activities of Daily Living , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Complementary Therapies , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Humans , Medicine, Chinese Traditional , Pandemics , Patient Health Questionnaire , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Res Pract Thromb Haemost ; 4(4): 524-531, 2020 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-601382

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused respiratory failure and associated mortality in numbers that have overwhelmed global health systems. Thrombotic coagulopathy is present in nearly three quarters of patients with COVID-19 admitted to the intensive care unit, and both the clinical picture and pathologic findings are consistent with microvascular occlusive phenomena being a major contributor to their unique form of respiratory failure. Numerous studies are ongoing focusing on anticytokine therapies, antibiotics, and antiviral agents, but none to date have focused on treating the underlying thrombotic coagulopathy in an effort to improve respiratory failure in COVID-19. There are animal data and a previous human trial demonstrating a survival advantage with fibrinolytic therapy to treat acute respiratory distress syndrome. Here, we review the extant and emerging literature on the relationship between thrombotic coagulopathy and pulmonary failure in the context of COVID-19 and present the scientific rationale for consideration of targeting the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems to improve pulmonary function in these patients.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL