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1.
JAMA ; 323(16): 1582-1589, 2020 04 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453469

ABSTRACT

Importance: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a pandemic with no specific therapeutic agents and substantial mortality. It is critical to find new treatments. Objective: To determine whether convalescent plasma transfusion may be beneficial in the treatment of critically ill patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. Design, Setting, and Participants: Case series of 5 critically ill patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) who met the following criteria: severe pneumonia with rapid progression and continuously high viral load despite antiviral treatment; Pao2/Fio2 <300; and mechanical ventilation. All 5 were treated with convalescent plasma transfusion. The study was conducted at the infectious disease department, Shenzhen Third People's Hospital in Shenzhen, China, from January 20, 2020, to March 25, 2020; final date of follow-up was March 25, 2020. Clinical outcomes were compared before and after convalescent plasma transfusion. Exposures: Patients received transfusion with convalescent plasma with a SARS-CoV-2-specific antibody (IgG) binding titer greater than 1:1000 (end point dilution titer, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA]) and a neutralization titer greater than 40 (end point dilution titer) that had been obtained from 5 patients who recovered from COVID-19. Convalescent plasma was administered between 10 and 22 days after admission. Main Outcomes and Measures: Changes of body temperature, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score (range 0-24, with higher scores indicating more severe illness), Pao2/Fio2, viral load, serum antibody titer, routine blood biochemical index, ARDS, and ventilatory and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) supports before and after convalescent plasma transfusion. Results: All 5 patients (age range, 36-65 years; 2 women) were receiving mechanical ventilation at the time of treatment and all had received antiviral agents and methylprednisolone. Following plasma transfusion, body temperature normalized within 3 days in 4 of 5 patients, the SOFA score decreased, and Pao2/Fio2 increased within 12 days (range, 172-276 before and 284-366 after). Viral loads also decreased and became negative within 12 days after the transfusion, and SARS-CoV-2-specific ELISA and neutralizing antibody titers increased following the transfusion (range, 40-60 before and 80-320 on day 7). ARDS resolved in 4 patients at 12 days after transfusion, and 3 patients were weaned from mechanical ventilation within 2 weeks of treatment. Of the 5 patients, 3 have been discharged from the hospital (length of stay: 53, 51, and 55 days), and 2 are in stable condition at 37 days after transfusion. Conclusions and Relevance: In this preliminary uncontrolled case series of 5 critically ill patients with COVID-19 and ARDS, administration of convalescent plasma containing neutralizing antibody was followed by improvement in their clinical status. The limited sample size and study design preclude a definitive statement about the potential effectiveness of this treatment, and these observations require evaluation in clinical trials.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Viral/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Blood Donors , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Critical Illness , Female , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Male , Methylprednisolone/therapeutic use , Middle Aged , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Med Sci Monit ; 26: e922281, 2020 Mar 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453382

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a sudden and serious disease with increasing morbidity and mortality rates. Phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) is a novel target for inflammatory disease, and ibudilast (IBU), a PDE4 inhibitor, inhibits inflammatory response. Our study investigated the effect of IBU on the pathogenesis of neonatal ARDS and the underlying mechanism related to it. MATERIAL AND METHODS Western blotting was performed to analyze the expression levels of PDE4, CXCR4, SDF-1, CXCR5, CXCL1, inflammatory cytokines, and proteins related to cell apoptosis. Hematoxylin-eosin staining was performed to observe the pathological morphology of lung tissue. Pulmonary edema score was used to assess the degree of lung water accumulation after pulmonary injury. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to assess levels of inflammatory factors (TNF-alpha, IL-1ß, IL-6, and MCP-1) in serum. TUNEL assay was used to detect apoptotic cells. RESULTS Increased expression of PDE4 was observed in an LPS-induced neonatal ARDS mouse model, and IBU ameliorated LPS-induced pathological manifestations and pulmonary edema in lung tissue. In addition, IBU attenuated the secretion of inflammatory cytokines by inactivating the chemokine axis in the LPS-induced neonatal ARDS mouse model. Finally, IBU significantly reduced LPS-induced cell apoptosis in lung tissue. CONCLUSIONS IBU, a PDE4 inhibitor, protected against ARDS by interfering with pulmonary inflammation and apoptosis. Our findings provide a novel and promising strategy to regulate pulmonary inflammation in ARDS.


Subject(s)
Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterases, Type 4/metabolism , Inflammation/drug therapy , Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitors/pharmacology , Pyridines/pharmacology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn/drug therapy , Animals , Animals, Newborn , Apoptosis/drug effects , Apoptosis/immunology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Inflammation/diagnosis , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/pathology , Injections, Intraperitoneal , Lipopolysaccharides/immunology , Lung/drug effects , Lung/immunology , Lung/pathology , Mice , Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Pyridines/therapeutic use , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn/diagnosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn/immunology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn/pathology , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Signal Transduction/immunology
3.
Ann Intensive Care ; 10(1): 24, 2020 Feb 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453061

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Right ventricular (RV) function evaluation by echocardiography is key in the management of ICU patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), however, it remains challenging. Quantification of RV deformation by speckle-tracking echocardiography (STE) is a recently available and reproducible technique that provides an integrated analysis of the RV. However, data are scarce regarding its use in critically ill patients. The aim of this study was to assess its feasibility and clinical usefulness in moderate-severe ARDS patients. RESULTS: Forty-eight ARDS patients under invasive mechanical ventilation (MV) were consecutively enrolled in a prospective observational study. A full transthoracic echocardiography was performed within 36 h of MV initiation. STE-derived and conventional parameters were recorded. Strain imaging of the RV lateral, inferior and septal walls was highly feasible (47/48 (98%) patients). Interobserver reproducibility of RV strain values displayed good reliability (intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) > 0.75 for all STE-derived parameters) in ARDS patients. ROC curve analysis showed that lateral, inferior, global (average of the 3 RV walls) longitudinal systolic strain (LSS) and global strain rate demonstrated significant diagnostic values when compared to several conventional indices (TAPSE, S', RV FAC). A RV global LSS value > - 13.7% differentiated patients with a TAPSE < vs > 12 mm with a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 83%. Regarding clinical outcomes, mortality and cumulative incidence of weaning from MV at day 28 were not different in patients with normal versus abnormal STE-derived parameters. CONCLUSIONS: Global STE assessment of the RV was highly achievable and reproducible in moderate-severe ARDS patients under MV and additionally correlated with several conventional parameters of RV function. In our cohort, STE-derived parameters did not provide any incremental value in terms of survival or weaning from MV prediction. Further investigations are needed to evaluate their theranostic usefulness. Trial registration NCT02638844: NCT.

4.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med ; 2020 Sep 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1452989

ABSTRACT

Rationale: Obesity is characterized by elevated pleural pressure (PPL) and worsening atelectasis during mechanical ventilation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Objectives: To determine the effects of lung recruitment maneuver (LRM) in the presence of elevated PPL on hemodynamics, left and right ventricular pressures and pulmonary vascular resistance. We hypothesized that elevated PPL protects the cardiovascular system against high airway pressures and prevents lung overdistension. Methods: First, an interventional crossover trial in adult subjects with ARDS and BMI ≥35 kg/m2 (n=21) was performed to explore the hemodynamic consequences of LRM. Second, cardiovascular function was studied during low/high PEEPs in a model of swine with ARDS and high PPL (n=9) versus healthy swine with normal PPL (n=6). Measurements and Main Results: Subjects with ARDS and obesity (BMI=57±12 kg/m2), following LRM, required an increase in PEEP of 8[7, 10] cmH2O above traditional ARDSnet settings to improve lung function, oxygenation and ventilation/perfusion matching, without impairment of hemodynamics or right heart function. ARDS swine with high PPL demonstrated unchanged transmural left ventricle pressure and systemic blood pressure after LRM protocol. Pulmonary artery hypertension decreased 8[13, 4] mmHg, as did vascular resistance 1.5[2.2, 0.9] WU, and transmural right ventricle pressure 10[15, 6] mmHg during exhalation. LRM and PEEP decreased pulmonary vascular resistance and normalized ventilation/perfusion ratio. Conclusions: High airway pressure is required to recruit lung atelectasis in patients with ARDS and class III obesity but causes minimal overdistension. Additionally, patients with ARDS and class III obesity tolerate hemodynamically LRM with high airway pressure.

5.
BMJ Open Respir Res ; 7(1)2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388517

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is the major cause of mortality in patients with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia. It appears that development of 'cytokine storm' in patients with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia precipitates progression to ARDS. However, severity scores on admission do not predict severity or mortality in patients with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia. Our objective was to determine whether patients with SARS-CoV-2 ARDS are clinically distinct, therefore requiring alternative management strategies, compared with other patients with ARDS. We report a single-centre retrospective study comparing the characteristics and outcomes of patients with ARDS with and without SARS-CoV-2. METHODS: Two intensive care unit (ICU) cohorts of patients at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham were analysed: SARS-CoV-2 patients admitted between 11 March and 21 April 2020 and all patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) from bacterial or viral infection who developed ARDS between 1 January 2017 and 1 November 2019. All data were routinely collected on the hospital's electronic patient records. RESULTS: A greater proportion of SARS-CoV-2 patients were from an Asian ethnic group (p=0.002). SARS-CoV-2 patients had lower circulating leucocytes, neutrophils and monocytes (p<0.0001), but higher CRP (p=0.016) on ICU admission. SARS-CoV-2 patients required a longer duration of mechanical ventilation (p=0.01), but had lower vasopressor requirements (p=0.016). DISCUSSION: The clinical syndromes and respiratory mechanics of SARS-CoV-2 and CAP-ARDS are broadly similar. However, SARS-CoV-2 patients initially have a lower requirement for vasopressor support, fewer circulating leukocytes and require prolonged ventilation support. Further studies are required to determine whether the dysregulated inflammation observed in SARS-CoV-2 ARDS may contribute to the increased duration of respiratory failure.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Critical Care/methods , Patient Outcome Assessment , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Leukocytes/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Monocytes/metabolism , Neutrophils/metabolism , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Respiratory Mechanics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Time , United Kingdom , Vasoconstrictor Agents/therapeutic use
6.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 7: 589553, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1383857

ABSTRACT

Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in the elderly population (≥65 years of age). Additionally, age is widely reported as a risk factor for the development of ARDS. However, the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms behind the increased risk of developing, and increased severity of, ARDS in the elderly population are not fully understood. This is compounded by the significant heterogeneity observed in patients with ARDS. With an aging population worldwide, a better understanding of these mechanisms could facilitate the development of therapies to improve outcomes in this population. In this review, the current clinical evidence of age as a risk factor and prognostic indicator in ARDS and the potential underlying mechanisms that may contribute to these factors are outlined. In addition, research on age-dependent treatment options and biomarkers, as well as future prospects for targeting these underlying mechanisms, are discussed.

7.
Crit Care ; 24(1): 675, 2020 Dec 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388807

ABSTRACT

An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via the original article.

8.
Indian J Crit Care Med ; 24(10): 914-918, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1350380

ABSTRACT

Background: The World Health Organization (WHO) has declared SARS-CoV-2 as pandemic. Patients with COVID-19 present mainly with respiratory symptoms. Prone position has been traditionally used in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) to improve oxygenation and prevent barotrauma in ventilated patients. Awake proning is being used as an investigational therapy in COVID to defer invasive ventilation, improve oxygenation, and outcomes. Hence, we conducted a retrospective case study to look for benefits of awake proning with oxygen therapy in non-intubated COVID patients. Materials and methods: A retrospective case study of 15 COVID patients admitted from June 15 to July 1, 2020 to HDU in our hospital was conducted. Cooperative patients who were hemodynamically stable and SpO2 < 90% on presentation were included. Oxygen was administered through facemask, non-rebreathing mask and noninvasive ventilation to patients as per requirement. Patients were encouraged to maintain prone position and target time was 10-12 hours/day. SpO2 and P/f ratio in supine and prone position was observed till discharge. Primary target was SpO2 > 95% and P/f > 200 mm Hg. Other COVID therapies were used according to institutional protocol. Results: The mean SpO2 on room air on admission was 80%. In day 1 to 3, the mean P/f ratio in supine position was 98.8 ± 29.7 mm Hg which improved to 136.6 ± 38.8 mm Hg after proning (p = 0.005). The difference was significant from day 1 to 10. Two patients were intubated. The mean duration of stay was 11 days. Conclusion: Awake prone positioning showed marked improvement in P/f ratio and SpO2 in COVID-19 patients with improvement in clinical symptoms with reduced rate of intubation. Highlights: Prone position ventilation improves oxygenation by reducing V/Q mismatch.Awake prone positioning has been used along with high-flow oxygen therapy in recent pandemic of SARS-CoV-2 virus for management of mild to moderate cases. How to cite this article: Singh P, Jain P, Deewan H. Awake Prone Positioning in COVID-19 Patients. Indian J Crit Care Med 2020;24(10):914-918.

9.
Clin Case Rep ; 8(12): 2990-2994, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1335967

ABSTRACT

The biological anakinra appears promising to halt cytokine storm syndrome seen in severe courses of COVID-19. However, immunosuppression with anakinra may facilitate sepsis, necessitating continuous screening for bacterial superinfections.

10.
J Thromb Haemost ; 18(7): 1747-1751, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317985

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Few observations exist with respect to the pro-coagulant profile of patients with COVID-19 acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Reports of thromboembolic complications are scarce but suggestive for a clinical relevance of the problem. OBJECTIVES: Prospective observational study aimed to characterize the coagulation profile of COVID-19 ARDS patients with standard and viscoelastic coagulation tests and to evaluate their changes after establishment of an aggressive thromboprophylaxis. METHODS: Sixteen patients with COVID-19 ARDS received a complete coagulation profile at the admission in the intensive care unit. Ten patients were followed in the subsequent 7 days, after increasing the dose of low molecular weight heparin, antithrombin levels correction, and clopidogrel in selected cases. RESULTS: At baseline, the patients showed a pro-coagulant profile characterized by an increased clot strength (CS, median 55 hPa, 95% interquartile range 35-63), platelet contribution to CS (PCS, 43 hPa; interquartile range 24-45), fibrinogen contribution to CS (FCS, 12 hPa; interquartile range 6-13.5) elevated D-dimer levels (5.5 µg/mL, interquartile range 2.5-6.5), and hyperfibrinogenemia (794 mg/dL, interquartile range 583-933). Fibrinogen levels were associated (R2  = .506, P = .003) with interleukin-6 values. After increasing the thromboprophylaxis, there was a significant (P = .001) time-related decrease of fibrinogen levels, D-dimers (P = .017), CS (P = .013), PCS (P = .035), and FCS (P = .038). CONCLUSION: The pro-coagulant pattern of these patients may justify the clinical reports of thromboembolic complications (pulmonary embolism) during the course of the disease. Further studies are needed to assess the best prophylaxis and treatment of this condition.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Blood Coagulation Disorders/blood , Blood Coagulation , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Aged , Anticoagulants/administration & dosage , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Coagulation/drug effects , Blood Coagulation Disorders/diagnosis , Blood Coagulation Disorders/drug therapy , Blood Coagulation Disorders/virology , Blood Coagulation Tests , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Fibrinolytic Agents/administration & dosage , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
11.
J Thromb Haemost ; 18(7): 1752-1755, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317980

ABSTRACT

A prothrombotic coagulopathy is commonly found in critically ill COVID-19 patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). A unique feature of COVID-19 respiratory failure is a relatively preserved lung compliance and high Alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient, with pathology reports consistently demonstrating diffuse pulmonary microthrombi on autopsy, all consistent with a vascular occlusive etiology of respiratory failure rather than the more classic findings of low-compliance in ARDS. The COVID-19 pandemic is overwhelming the world's medical care capacity with unprecedented needs for mechanical ventilators and high rates of mortality once patients progress to needing mechanical ventilation, and in many environments including in parts of the United States the medical capacity is being exhausted. Fibrinolytic therapy has previously been used in a Phase 1 clinical trial that led to reduced mortality and marked improvements in oxygenation. Here we report a series of three patients with severe COVID-19 respiratory failure who were treated with tissue plasminogen activator. All three patients had a temporally related improvement in their respiratory status, with one of them being a durable response.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Blood Coagulation Disorders/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Fibrinolysis/drug effects , Fibrinolytic Agents/administration & dosage , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Thrombolytic Therapy , Tissue Plasminogen Activator/administration & dosage , Aged , Blood Coagulation Disorders/blood , Blood Coagulation Disorders/diagnosis , Blood Coagulation Disorders/virology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Fatal Outcome , Female , Fibrinolytic Agents/adverse effects , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Recovery of Function , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombolytic Therapy/adverse effects , Tissue Plasminogen Activator/adverse effects , Treatment Outcome
12.
Turk J Anaesthesiol Reanim ; 48(3): 254-255, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1299651
13.
Pharmacol Res ; 159: 104965, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279676

ABSTRACT

Little is still known about the clinical features associated with the occurrence of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in hospitalized patients with Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The aim of the present study was to describe the prevalence of pre-admission antithrombotic therapies in patients with COVID-19 and to investigate the potential association between antithrombotic therapy and ARDS, as disease clinical presentation, or in-hospital mortality. We enrolled 192 consecutive patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 admitted to emergency department of five Italian hospitals. The study population was divided in two groups according to the evidence of ARDS at chest computed tomography at admission. Propensity score weighting adjusted regression analysis was performed to assess the risk ARDS at admission, and death during hospitalization, in patients treated or not with antiplatelet and anticoagulant agents. ARDS was reported in 73 cases (38 %), who showed more likely hypertension compared to those without ARDS (57.8 % vs 49.6 %; P = 0.005). Thirty-five patients (18.5 %) died during the hospitalization. Not survived COVID-19 patients showed a statistically significant increased age (77 ± 8.31 vs 65.57 ± 8.31; P = 0.001), hypertension (77.1 % vs 53.5 %; P = 0.018) and coronary artery disease prevalence (28.6 % vs 10.2 %; P = 0.009). Both unadjusted and adjusted regression analyses showed no difference in the risk of ARDS at admission, or death during hospitalization, between patients treated or not with antiplatelets or anticoagulants. Pre-admission antithrombotic therapy, both antiplatelet and anticoagulant, does not seem to show a protective effect in severe forms of COVID-19 with ARDS at presentation and rapidly evolving toward death.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Fibrinolytic Agents/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Drug Administration Schedule , Female , Fibrinolytic Agents/administration & dosage , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Admission , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/mortality , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Ann Pharmacother ; 56(1): 73-82, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1197336

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe clinically pertinent challenges of managing sedation in COVID-19 patients on venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV-ECMO) and describe considerations for enhanced safety and efficacy of pharmacological agents used. DATA SOURCES: A PubMed search was performed using the following search terms: ECMO, ARDS, sedation, COVID-19, coronavirus, opioids, analgesia, fentanyl, hydromorphone, morphine, oxycodone, methadone, ketamine, propofol, dexmedetomidine, clonidine, benzodiazepines, midazolam, lorazepam, and diazepam. STUDY SELECTION AND DATA EXTRACTION: Relevant clinical and pharmacokinetic studies were considered. All studies included were published between January 1988 and March 2021. DATA SYNTHESIS: Patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome secondary to COVID-19 may progress to requiring VV-ECMO support. Agents frequently used for sedation and analgesia in these patients have been shown to have significant adsorption to ECMO circuitry, leading to possible diminished clinical efficacy. Use of hydromorphone-based analgesia has been associated with improved clinical outcomes in patients on VV-ECMO. However, safety and efficacy regarding use of other agents in this patient population remains an area of further research. RELEVANCE TO PATIENT CARE AND CLINICAL PRACTICE: This review addresses clinical challenges associated with sedation management in COVID-19 patients requiring VV-ECMO support and provides potential strategies to overcome these challenges. CONCLUSIONS: Historically, sedation and analgesia management in patients requiring ECMO support have posed a challenge for bedside clinicians given the unique physiological and pharmacokinetic changes in this patient population. A multimodal strategy to managing analgesia and sedation should be used, and the use of enteral agents may play a role in reducing parenteral agent requirements.


Subject(s)
Analgesia , COVID-19 , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Res Pract Thromb Haemost ; 2020 May 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1184616

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused a large surge of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Prior phase I trials (non COVID-19) demonstrated improvement in pulmonary function in ARDS patients using fibrinolytic therapy. A follow-up trial using the widely available tissue-plasminogen activator (alteplase) is now needed to assess optimal dosing and safety in this critically ill patient population. Objective: To describe the design and rationale of a Phase IIa trial to evaluate the safety and efficacy of alteplase treatment for moderate/severe COVID-19-induced ARDS. Patients/Methods: A rapidly adaptive, pragmatic, open label, randomized, controlled, phase IIa clinical trial will be conducted with three groups: intravenous(IV) alteplase 50mg, IV alteplase 100mg, and control (standard-of-care). Inclusion criteria are known/suspected COVID-19 infection with PaO2/FiO2 ratio<150mmHg for >4 hours despite maximal mechanical ventilation management. Alteplase will be delivered through an initial bolus of 50mg or 100mg followed by heparin infusion for systemic anticoagulation, with alteplase re-dosing if there is a >20% PaO2/FiO2 improvement not sustained by 24 hours. Results: The primary outcome is improvement in PaO2/FiO2 at 48 hours post-randomization. Other outcomes include: ventilator- and ICU-free-days, successful extubation (no reintubation ≤3 days after initial extubation), and mortality. Fifity eligible patients will be enrolled in a rapidly adaptive, modified stepped-wedge design with four looks at the data. Conclusion: Findings will provide timely information on the safety, efficacy and optimal dosing of tPA to treat moderate/severe COVID-19-induced ARDS, which can be rapidly adapted to a phase III trial. (NCT04357730; FDA IND 149634).

17.
Rev Esp Anestesiol Reanim (Engl Ed) ; 2020 Oct 26.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1179989

ABSTRACT

Iatrogenic tracheal rupture is a serious complication secondary to procedures such as emergent orotracheal intubation or tracheostomy, among others. The management of iatrogenic tracheal rupture depends on the size, extension and location of the injury, along with the patient's respiratory status and comorbidities. The priority of treatment is to keep the airway permeable to ensure adequate ventilation. We present the case of a tracheal rupture after performing a percutaneous tracheostomy, in a patient diagnosed with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome secondary to bilateral interstitial pneumonia due to SARS-CoV-2. The issues are discussed, such as the management (conservative vs. surgical) depending on the features of the injury and the patient, in the extraordinary context that the COVID-19 pandemic has entailed.

18.
J Transl Med ; 18(1): 427, 2020 11 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-916978

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) play essential roles in immune homeostasis and repair of damaged lung tissue. We hypothesized that patients whose lung injury resolves quickly, as measured by time to liberation from mechanical ventilation, have a higher percentage of Tregs amongst CD4+ T cells in either airway, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) or peripheral blood samples. METHODS: We prospectively enrolled patients with ARDS requiring mechanical ventilation and collected serial samples, the first within 72 h of ARDS diagnosis (day 0) and the second 48-96 h later (day 3). We analyzed immune cell populations and cytokines in BAL, tracheal aspirates and peripheral blood, as well as cytokines in plasma, obtained at the time of bronchoscopy. The study cohort was divided into fast resolvers (FR; n = 8) and slow resolvers (SR; n = 5), based on the median number of days until first extubation for all participants (n = 13). The primary measure was the percentage of CD4+ T cells that were Tregs. RESULTS: The BAL of FR contained more Tregs than SR. This finding did not extend to Tregs in tracheal aspirates or blood. BAL Tregs expressed more of the full-length FOXP3 than a splice variant missing exon 2 compared to Tregs in simultaneously obtained peripheral blood. CONCLUSION: Tregs are present in the bronchoalveolar space during ARDS. A greater percentage of CD4+ cells were Tregs in the BAL of FR than SR. Tregs may play a role in the resolution of ARDS, and enhancing their numbers or functions may be a therapeutic target.


Subject(s)
Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Bronchoalveolar Lavage , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid , Humans , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory
20.
Intensive Care Med ; 46(12): 2168-2183, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1151991

ABSTRACT

Pulmonary infection is one of the main complications occurring in patients suffering from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Besides traditional risk factors, dysregulation of lung immune defenses and microbiota may play an important role in ARDS patients. Prone positioning does not seem to be associated with a higher risk of pulmonary infection. Although bacteria associated with ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in ARDS patients are similar to those in patients without ARDS, atypical pathogens (Aspergillus, herpes simplex virus and cytomegalovirus) may also be responsible for infection in ARDS patients. Diagnosing pulmonary infection in ARDS patients is challenging, and requires a combination of clinical, biological and microbiological criteria. The role of modern tools (e.g., molecular methods, metagenomic sequencing, etc.) remains to be evaluated in this setting. One of the challenges of antimicrobial treatment is antibiotics diffusion into the lungs. Although targeted delivery of antibiotics using nebulization may be interesting, their place in ARDS patients remains to be explored. The use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in the most severe patients is associated with a high rate of infection and raises several challenges, diagnostic issues and pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics changes being at the top. Prevention of pulmonary infection is a key issue in ARDS patients, but there is no specific measure for these high-risk patients. Reinforcing preventive measures using bundles seems to be the best option.


Subject(s)
Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Humans , Lung , Patient Positioning , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy
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