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1.
Clin Rheumatol ; 40(10): 4167-4178, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1252128

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Multi-system inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) is a less understood and a rare complication of coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). Given the scarce data regarding this novel disease, we aimed to describe the clinical features and outcomes of our patients with MIS-C and to evaluate the associated factors for the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) admission. METHODS: The MIS-C patients under 18 years old diagnosed and treated in three referral centers between July 2020 and March 2021 were included. Data of the patients were retrospectively obtained from their medical records. RESULTS: Overall, 76 subjects (24 females) with a mean age of 8.17 ± 4.42 years were enrolled. Twenty-seven (35.5%) patients were admitted to the PICUs. The two most common systemic involvement patterns were cardiac and gastrointestinal. There was only one lethal outcome in a patient with underlying acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Those with higher procalcitonin levels at admission were found to stay longer in the hospital (r = 0.254, p = 0.027). The risk of PICU admission increased with age (aOR: 1.277; 95% CI: 1.089-1.498; p = 0.003) and with decreased initial serum albumin levels (aOR: 0.105; 95% CI: 0.029-0.378; p = 0.001). CONCLUSION: Although there is a wide clinical variability among the patients with MIS-C, we suggest that those with older age and lower initial serum albumin levels merit close monitoring due to their higher risk for PICU admission. Key Points • Although there is a wide variability regarding the management process among clinicians, MIS-C is a rare, severe, less understood complication of COVID-19 that may cause rapid clinical deterioration in the patients. • Clinicians should be aware of this condition in children with persistent fever and a family history of COVID-19. • Older age and low serum albumin levels are the independent predictors for the pediatric intensive care unit admission among MIS-C patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Aged , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome
2.
J Med Virol ; 93(7): 4532-4536, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1172352

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is caused by a contagious virus that has spread to more than 200 countries, territories, and regions. Thousands of studies to date have examined all aspects of this disease, yet little is known about the postrecovery status of patients, especially in the long term. Here, we examined erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and serum albumin biomarkers in patients with a history of severe and mild-to-moderate COVID-19 following their recovery. In patients with severe COVID-19 serum albumin had a strong negative correlation with both ESR and CRP levels (R2 = - 0.861 and R2 = - 0.711), respectively. Also, there was a positive correlation between ESR and CRP level (R2 = 0.85) in the same group. However, there was no correlation between these biomarkers among mild-to-moderate COVID-19 patients. In addition, no correlation was recorded between the severe and mild-to-moderate COVID-19 groups. This finding highlights the sustained elevation of ESR and CRP level and reduced serum albumin level that may persist postrecovery in patients with a history of severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Blood Sedimentation , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/blood , Hypoalbuminemia/blood , Serum Albumin/analysis , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/pathology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index
3.
Nephrologe ; 16(1): 26-32, 2021.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-986660

ABSTRACT

The aim of this article is to explain the clinical benefits of the growing knowledge about severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). In addition to the lungs, SARS-CoV­2 can invade multiple cell types in other organs, such as the kidneys and replicate there. Important damaging pathways of the virus, such as vascular endotheliitis, thrombotic events and systemic cytokine release are still incompletely understood. Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a systemic disease that necessitates intensive medical care and in particular, internal medicine involvement and represents a major challenge for all disciplines of internal medicine. Among these, nephrology in particular is involved in the fight against COVID-19 in a variety of ways: urine investigations can provide indications of multiple organ involvement, endotheliitis, microthrombi and microcirculation damage, etc. Experience with low serum albumin levels and antithrombin III activity in nephrotic patients helps to point out the decreasing effects of loop diuretics and heparin to other specialist disciplines. Nephrological knowledge of the complications of hypoalbuminemia and "resistance" to diuretics must lead to an early implementation of renal replacement procedures in order to be able to prevent mechanical ventilation in COVID-19 intensive care patients with increased extracellular lung fluid. The kidneys can be used as a seismograph for severe courses of COVID-19 and nephrological knowledge can be brought to use to optimize the intensive medical care for critically ill patients. Both together have the potential to considerably reduce morbidity and mortality further.

4.
J Infect Chemother ; 26(8): 865-869, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-245541

ABSTRACT

We investigated the clinical course of individuals with 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) who were transferred from the Diamond Princess cruise ship to 12 local hospitals. The conditions and clinical courses of patients with pneumonia were compared with those of patients without pneumonia. Among 70 patients (median age: 67 years) analyzed, the major symptoms were fever (64.3%), cough (54.3%), and general fatigue (24.3%). Forty-three patients (61.4%) had pneumonia. Higher body temperature, heart rate, and respiratory rate as well as higher of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and lower serum albumin level and lymphocyte count were associated with the presence of pneumonia. Ground-glass opacity was found in 97.7% of the patients with pneumonia. Patients were administered neuraminidase inhibitors (20%), lopinavir/ritonavir (32.9%), and ciclesonide inhalation (11.4%). Mechanical ventilation and veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was performed on 14 (20%) and 2 (2.9%) patients, respectively; two patients died. The median duration of intubation was 12 days. The patients with COVID-19 transferred to local hospitals during the outbreak had severe conditions and needed close monitoring. The severity of COVID-19 depends on the presence of pneumonia. High serum LDH, AST and CRP levels and low serum albumin level and lymphocyte count were found to be predictors of pneumonia. It was challenging for local hospitals to admit and treat these patients during the outbreak of COVID-19. Assessment of severity was crucial to manage a large number of patients.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Disease Outbreaks , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Aged , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Diabetes Complications/complications , Female , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Japan , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Acuity , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Ships
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