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1.
Turk Thorac J ; 22(2): 142-148, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1285488

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Millions of people suffer from sleep disturbances. In addition, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic created several new challenges-particularly for frontline healthcare workers (HCWs). This study assessed the sleep quality (SQ) among HCWs. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted using an English-language online survey. The participants were invited via a web link sent using social network platforms. It included sociodemographic- and profession-related characteristics. COVID-19-associated risks were assessed (e.g., being on the front line, doing swabs, satisfaction about protective equipment, and management protocols). Assessment of SQ was done using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and various medical errors were recorded. RESULTS: A total of 217 HCWs completed the survey with mean (±standard deviation) age of 35.8 (±7.3) years; 56.2% were male, 18.43% had comorbidities, and 61.75% experienced sleep difficulties before the COVID-19 crisis. This work reports a 78.8% prevalence of poor SQ, with the mean (standard deviation) global PSQI score of 9.36 (±4.4). HCWs with poor sleep experienced more positive comorbid profile (23.64% versus 6.52%, p=0.01). Working on the front lines of COVID-19 was associated with poor sleep (69.59% versus 47.83%, p=0.006). Among the participants, 77.42% performed medical errors, particularly not checking for drug allergies (17.97%), dispensing medication with incomplete instructions (20.74%), providing incorrect doses or overdosing (14.75%), incorrectly explaining the use of medication (9.22%), and prescribing a drug to the wrong patient (10.14%). CONCLUSION: This nationwide survey reported high prevalence of poor SQ among HCWs during the COVID-19 pandemic. Being an HCW on the front lines of COVID-19 and doing swabs with a positive comorbidity was associated with poor sleep.

2.
EClinicalMedicine ; 36: 100899, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1240306

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A significant proportion of individuals experience lingering and debilitating symptoms following acute COVID-19 infection. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) have coined the persistent cluster of symptoms as post-COVID syndrome. This has been further sub-categorised into acute post-COVID syndrome for symptoms persisting three weeks beyond initial infection and chronic post-COVID syndrome for symptoms persisting beyond twelve weeks. The aim of this review was to detail the prevalence of clinical features and identify potential predictors for acute and chronic post-COVID syndrome. METHODS: A systematic literature search, with no language restrictions, was performed to identify studies detailing characteristics and outcomes related to survivorship of post-COVID syndrome. The last search was performed on 6 March 2021 and all pre-dating published articles included. A means of proportion meta-analysis was performed to quantify characteristics of acute and chronic post-COVID syndrome. Study quality was assessed with a specific risk of bias tool. PROSPERO Registration: CRD42020222855. FINDINGS: A total of 43 studies met the eligibility criteria; of which, 38 allowed for meta-analysis. Fatigue and dyspnoea were the most prevalent symptoms in acute post-COVID (0·37 and 0·35) and fatigue and sleep disturbance in chronic post-COVID syndrome (0·48 and 0·44), respectively. The available evidence is generally of poor quality, with considerable risk of bias, and are of observational design. INTERPRETATION: In conclusion, this review highlights that flaws in data capture and interpretation, noted in the uncertainty within our meta-analysis, affect the applicability of current knowledge. Policy makers and researchers must focus on understanding the impact of this condition on individuals and society with appropriate funding initiatives and global collaborative research.

3.
J Asthma ; : 1-7, 2021 Jun 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1232110

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: There is limited information in literature on how coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic period affects people with asthma. This study aimed to compare levels of physical activity, stress, and fear and quality of life and sleep quality between patients with asthma and healthy individuals during the pandemic. METHODS: Twenty-two patients with asthma and 22 healthy individuals aged between 18 and 65 years were included. Physical activity level using "International Physical Activity Questionnaire"; stress level, using "Perceived Stress Scale-14"; fear level, using "Fear of COVID-19 Scale"; sleep quality, using "Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index"; and quality of life, using "World Health Organization Quality of Life" were evaluated. RESULTS: Total physical activity level, vigorous physical activity level, and walking score of patients with asthma were lower than healthy individuals (p < .05). Sitting time of patients with asthma was higher than healthy individuals (p < .05). Subjective sleep quality, latency, duration, efficiency, sleeping medication use, and daytime dysfunction of both were similar (p > .05). Only sleep disturbance score of patients with asthma were higher than healthy individuals (p < .05). Quality of life, stress, and fear levels of both were similar (p > .05). CONCLUSION: During pandemic, patients with asthma are more inactive than healthy individuals regardless of the presence of a chronic disease; pandemic negatively affected stress, fear levels, sleep, and quality of life. To minimize the effects of restrictions and psychological burden caused by pandemic and to encourage patients with asthma to perform physical activities, conducting studies to control stress levels and increasing quality of life and sleep of all individuals are important.

4.
J Family Med Prim Care ; 10(3): 1246-1250, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1218672

ABSTRACT

AIMS SETTINGS AND DESIGN: The COVID-19 pandemic has forced upon sudden lifestyle changes because of nationwide lockdowns mandating isolation at home, affecting daily habits and lifestyle changes. The present study was conducted with an aim to assess these changes brought about because of COVID-19 lockdown restrictions. METHODS: The web-survey aimed to understand the immediate impact of the COVID-19 lockdown on people by using a structured questionnaire collecting demographic, lifestyle, and dietary information. The survey was disseminated online among the literate, urban, adult population with internet access. RESULTS: Of the 1,200 people who received the survey, a total of 1,008 respondents participated in the study, aged between 18 and 81 years (Median- 24). An increase in daily screen time has been observed in 56.7% of the population. A decrease in work-related stress was observed in 43% of the population, sleep pattern improved in 36.7% people, and 27.1% of the inactive population showed increased physical activity. A significant decrease in the proportion of people consuming junk food (73.8%), alcohol (27.6%), and smoking (8.1%) was observed. CONCLUSIONS: The present web-based survey study suggests a significant change in the lifestyle and dietary patterns of people brought about because of the COVID-19 lockdown most highly seen as a major increase in screen usage and a decrease in junk food consumption.

5.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(6): e28892, 2021 06 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1201852

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since late 2019, the lives of people across the globe have been disrupted by COVID-19. Millions of people have become infected with the disease, while billions of people have been continually asked or required by local and national governments to change their behavioral patterns. Previous research on the COVID-19 pandemic suggests that it is associated with large-scale behavioral and mental health changes; however, few studies have been able to track these changes with frequent, near real-time sampling or compare these changes to previous years of data for the same individuals. OBJECTIVE: By combining mobile phone sensing and self-reported mental health data in a cohort of college-aged students enrolled in a longitudinal study, we seek to understand the behavioral and mental health impacts associated with the COVID-19 pandemic, measured by interest across the United States in the search terms coronavirus and COVID fatigue. METHODS: Behaviors such as the number of locations visited, distance traveled, duration of phone use, number of phone unlocks, sleep duration, and sedentary time were measured using the StudentLife mobile smartphone sensing app. Depression and anxiety were assessed using weekly self-reported ecological momentary assessments, including the Patient Health Questionnaire-4. The participants were 217 undergraduate students. Differences in behaviors and self-reported mental health collected during the Spring 2020 term, as compared to previous terms in the same cohort, were modeled using mixed linear models. RESULTS: Linear mixed models demonstrated differences in phone use, sleep, sedentary time and number of locations visited associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. In further models, these behaviors were strongly associated with increased interest in COVID fatigue. When mental health metrics (eg, depression and anxiety) were added to the previous measures (week of term, number of locations visited, phone use, sedentary time), both anxiety and depression (P<.001) were significantly associated with interest in COVID fatigue. Notably, these behavioral and mental health changes are consistent with those observed around the initial implementation of COVID-19 lockdowns in the spring of 2020. CONCLUSIONS: In the initial lockdown phase of the COVID-19 pandemic, people spent more time on their phones, were more sedentary, visited fewer locations, and exhibited increased symptoms of anxiety and depression. As the pandemic persisted through the spring, people continued to exhibit very similar changes in both mental health and behaviors. Although these large-scale shifts in mental health and behaviors are unsurprising, understanding them is critical in disrupting the negative consequences to mental health during the ongoing pandemic.


Subject(s)
Behavior , COVID-19/epidemiology , Ecological Momentary Assessment , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Smartphone , Students/psychology , Adolescent , Anxiety/diagnosis , Cell Phone Use/statistics & numerical data , Depression/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Locomotion , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Mobile Applications , Sedentary Behavior , Self Report , Sleep , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
6.
PLoS One ; 16(4): e0250793, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1201697

ABSTRACT

Social-distancing directives to contain community transmission of the COVID-19 virus can be expected to affect sleep timing, duration or quality. Remote work or school may increase time available for sleep, with benefits for immune function and mental health, particularly in those individuals who obtain less sleep than age-adjusted recommendations. Young adults are thought to regularly carry significant sleep debt related in part to misalignment between endogenous circadian clock time and social time. We examined the impact of social-distancing measures on sleep in young adults by comparing sleep self-studies submitted by students enrolled in a university course during the 2020 summer session (entirely remote instruction, N = 80) with self-studies submitted by students enrolled in the same course during previous summer semesters (on-campus instruction, N = 452; cross-sectional study design). Self-studies included 2-8 week sleep diaries, two chronotype questionnaires, written reports, and sleep tracker (Fitbit) data from a subsample. Students in the 2020 remote instruction semester slept later, less efficiently, less at night and more in the day, but did not sleep more overall despite online, asynchronous classes and ~44% fewer work days compared to students in previous summers. Subjectively, the net impact on sleep was judged as positive or negative in equal numbers of students, with students identifying as evening types significantly more likely to report a positive impact, and morning types a negative impact. Several features of the data suggest that the average amount of sleep reported by students in this summer course, historically and during the 2020 remote school semester, represents a homeostatic balance, rather than a chronic deficit. Regardless of the interpretation, the results provide additional evidence that social-distancing measures affect sleep in heterogeneous ways.


Subject(s)
Physical Distancing , Sleep , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/virology , Circadian Rhythm , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires , Time Factors , Universities , Young Adult
7.
Clin Neurol Neurosurg ; 205: 106640, 2021 Apr 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1184890

ABSTRACT

ОBJECTIVE: Sleep disturbances and fatigue are frequent symptoms in multiple sclerosis patients. The aim was to assess the quality of sleep (QoS) and fatigue in patients with the relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), during the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. METHODS: The study included 67 patients with RRMS and 85 healthy control subjects. RRMS patients, who were tested in first half of 2019, were retested in April and May 2020, during the COVID-19 pandemic. We collected sociodemographic and clinical data, and also used the following questionnaires: Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI), Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS), and Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54 Instrument (MSQOL-54). RESULTS: The FSS score and PSQI global score were significantly higher in patients with RRMS than in the control group (p < 0.01). We noticed a statistically significant difference between the results obtained a year ago and the results during the COVID-19 pandemic in PSQI global score (p < 0.01) and all subscores. Higher disability status was an independent predictor of the worse PSQI scores. CONCLUSION: During the COVID-19 outbreak worse QoS were noticed in RRMS patients than in healthy individuals. Also, QoS of RRMS patients is more affected during the COVID-19 pandemic than in regular circumstances. High levels of sleep disturbance and fatigue in RRMS patients correlates with worse life quality, female gender, lower educational level and partner status. The results of the present study provide evidence in support of regular screening and monitoring of fatigue and QoS in this patient population, especially during the pandemic states.

8.
Clin Neurol Neurosurg ; 205: 106639, 2021 Apr 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1179340

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In view of the high prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and the increasing global pandemic of SARS-CoV-2 infection, it is likely that many patients with OSA get exposed to this virus. Besides theoretical assumptions, there is no evidence that OSA may favor SARS-CoV-2 acquisition or may lead to a more severe disease. Taking the opportunity of the Atahualpa Project cohort, we aimed to assess the relationship between previously diagnosed OSA and SARS-CoV-2 infection in older adults living in rural Ecuador. PATIENTS AND METHODS: SARS-CoV-2 antibodies were determined in 180 individuals aged > 60 years that underwent polysomnography previously to this novel pandemic. Those with OSA remained untreated due to income limitations. Exposure-effect models were fitted with OSA as the exposure, SARS-CoV-2 seropositivity and symptomatology as the outcomes, and confounders - age, gender, obesity, arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, individuals per house, home confinement - as independent variables. RESULTS: A total of 87 (48%) individuals were seropositive to SARS-CoV-2, 77% of whom were symptomatic. The mean apnea/hypopnea index was 11.1 ± 11.7 episodes per hour, with 83 (46%) individuals having mild, and 38 (21%) moderate-to-severe OSA. Exposure-effect models demonstrated lack of relationship between OSA and SARS-CoV-2 seropositivity and symptomatology. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows no relationship between history of OSA and SARS-CoV-2 seropositivity or symptomatology, opposing previous suggestions that persons with OSA are more prone to acquire the infection and have a more severe disease.

9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(7)2021 03 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1154418

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate sleep and awakening quality (SQ and AQ) during COVID-19 in a large and diversified population in order to identify significant associations and risks in terms of demography, health and health-related behaviors, sleep variables, mental health, and attitudes. METHODS/RESULTS: Online surveys were used for data collection, received from 5479 individuals from the general population, sleep disorder patients, and COVID-involved (medical doctors (MDs) and nurses) and COVID-affected professionals (teachers, psychologists, and dentists). SQ and AQ were worse in adults, females, and high-education subjects. Feeling worse, having economic problems, depression, anxiety, irritability, and a high Calamity Experience Check List (CECL) score during COVID were significantly associated with poor SQ and AQ. Shorter sleep duration, increased latency, poor nutrition, low physical activity, increased mobile and social network use, more negative and less positive attitudes and behaviors were associated with poor AQ. CONCLUSIONS: The SQ logistic regression showed gender, morbidities, CECL, and awakenings as relevant, whereas, for AQ, relevant variables further included age and physical activity. Aiming to have a high stress compliance, each individual should sleep well, have important control of their mood, practice positive behaviors while dismissing negative behaviors and attitudes, practice exercise, have adequate nutrition, and beware of technologies and dependences.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Female , Health Behavior , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
Sleep ; 44(9)2021 09 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1153241

ABSTRACT

STUDY OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic has had dramatic effects on society and people's daily habits. In this observational study, we recorded objective data on sleep macro- and microarchitecture repeatedly over several nights before and during the COVID-19 government-imposed lockdown. The main objective was to evaluate changes in patterns of sleep duration and architecture during home confinement using the pre-confinement period as a control. METHODS: Participants were regular users of a sleep-monitoring headband that records, stores, and automatically analyzes physiological data in real time, equivalent to polysomnography. We measured sleep onset duration, total sleep time, duration of sleep stages (N2, N3, and rapid eye movement [REM]), and sleep continuity. Via the user's smartphone application, participants filled in questionnaires on how lockdown changed working hours, eating behavior, and daily life at home. They also filled in the Insomnia Severity Index, reduced Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale questionnaires, allowing us to create selected subgroups. RESULTS: The 599 participants were mainly men (71%) of median age 47 (interquartile range: 36-59). Compared to before lockdown, during lockdown individuals slept more overall (mean +3·83 min; SD: ±1.3), had less deep sleep (N3), more light sleep (N2), and longer REM sleep (mean +3·74 min; SD: ±0.8). They exhibited less weekend-specific changes, suggesting less sleep restriction during the week. Changes were most pronounced in individuals reporting eveningness preferences, suggesting relative sleep deprivation in this population and exacerbated sensitivity to societal changes. CONCLUSION: This unique dataset should help us understand the effects of lockdown on sleep architecture and on our health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep, REM , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep
11.
Epilepsy Behav ; 118: 107864, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1142314

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 pandemic heavily hit the western healthcare system saturating the hospital beds in wards and clogging the emergency departments. To avoid the collapse of Italian hospitals, office visits to outpatients were limited to emergencies and the general population went in a lockdown state. Physicians had to approach new problems in the management of chronic patients who could not leave their homes. In our experience as epilepsy clinic, the use of telemedicine was of crucial importance for monitoring our patients: phone call during lockdown let us monitor the stability of our 38 patients and psychometric parameters and habits that could influence seizures frequency. In particular, we found that in our patients, sleep quality was low resulting in high daily sleepiness and associated high stress levels. Secondly, we found an increase in daily screen hours and an association with daily sleepiness. In conclusion, we report our experience in managing people with epilepsy during the lockdown, underlining the utility of telemedicine as a valid monitoring tool and the necessity of a psychometric and behavioral screening.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epilepsy , Telemedicine , Communicable Disease Control , Epilepsy/complications , Epilepsy/epidemiology , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep
12.
Sleep Med ; 91: 205-210, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1142243

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to investigate the effect of Chronic Noncommunicable Diseases (CNCDs) on the onset or increase in sleep problems during the COVID-19 pandemic period. The role of the report of sadness or nervousness during the pandemic was also evaluated as a mediator of this association. Data from a behavior survey during COVID-19, conducted in Brazil with 45,161 people (18 years old or older), from April 24 to May 24, 2020, were used. The outcome variable was the onset or increase in sleep problems, and the exposure variable was the presence of CNCDs. The adjusted Odds Ratio of the association between CNCDs and sleep was estimated, and a mediation analysis was performed to test the effect of the report of sadness or nervousness on this association, using the Karlson Holm Breen method. The increase in sleep problems was reported by 44.9% of the population, and 33.9% reported at least one CNCD. The chance of sleep problems was higher among people with diabetes (1.34; 1.05-1.71), hypertension (1.26; 1.06-1.50), and with coronary heart diseases (1.36; 1.13-1.65) or respiratory diseases (1.42; 1.04-1.93). Compared to people without CNCDs, individuals with at least one CNCD had a 36% greater chance of impaired sleep (1.36; 1.19-1.55). The report of sadness or nervousness explained 45.1% of the association between CNCD and sleep. Our findings alert us to care for the emotional state and sleep of chronic patients during the waves of the COVID-19 pandemic, and indicate the need for sleep monitoring in this population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Noncommunicable Diseases , Sleep Wake Disorders , Adolescent , Adult , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Chronic Disease , Humans , Noncommunicable Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics , Sleep , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology
13.
Behav Sleep Med ; : 1-16, 2021 Mar 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1112066

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) forced Spain to implement unprecedented lockdown restriction. In this context, different factors could worsen sleep quality, but the impact of the pandemic and lockdown on sleep is still mostly unknown. In this cross-sectional study, we describe self-reported sleep disturbances in people without mental health disorders from a large Spanish sample (n = 15,070).Methods: During the early phase of the lockdown (19-26 March), an online survey was launched using a snowball sampling method and included sociodemographic and clinical data along with the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS-21) and the Impact of Event Scale (IES). Two items of the IES were employed to assess sleep characteristics. Descriptive and bivariate analysis and logistic regression models were performed.Results: Difficulty initiating or maintaining sleep were reported by 23.9% of the sample and was associated in the regression model with age (OR = 1.008, p = .003), female sex (OR = 1.344, p < .001), an income reduction >50% (OR = 1.248, p = .037), having one (OR = 1.208, p = .029) and two or more (OR = 1.299, p = .035) elderly dependents, drinking alcohol (OR = 1.129, p = .024), and a higher score on DASS-21 depression (OR = 1.148, p < .001), anxiety (OR = 1.218, p < .001), or stress (OR = 1.302, p < .001) subscales, whereas being able to enjoy free time (OR = 0.604, p < .001) and painting or listening to music (OR = 0.853, p = .012) were protective factors. Dreams related to COVID-19 were reported by 12.9% of the sample and were associated in the regression model with female sex (OR = 1.617, p < .001), being married (OR = 1.190, p = .015), self-employed (OR = 1.373, p = .032), or a civil servant (OR = 1.412, p = .010), having been tested for COVID-19 (OR = 1.583, p = .012), having infected family or friends (OR = 1.233, p = .001), reading news about coronavirus (OR = 1.139, p = .023), drinking alcohol (OR = 1.251, p < .001), and higher scores on DASS-21 depression (OR = 1.102, p < .001), anxiety (OR = 1.222, p < .001), or stress (OR = 1.213, p < .001) subscales, while protective factors were older age (OR = 0.983, p < .001) and being retired (OR = 0.625, p = .045).Conclusions: These findings could help clinicians and public health systems design and deliver tailored interventions, such as internet-delivered campaigns, to promote sleep quality in the general population.

14.
Diabet Med ; 38(10): e14549, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1109524

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Restrictions during the COVID-19 crisis will have impacted on opportunities to be active. We aimed to (a) quantify the impact of COVID-19 restrictions on accelerometer-assessed physical activity and sleep in people with type 2 diabetes and (b) identify predictors of physical activity during COVID-19 restrictions. METHODS: Participants were from the UK Chronotype of Patients with type 2 diabetes and Effect on Glycaemic Control (CODEC) observational study. Participants wore an accelerometer on their wrist for 8 days before and during COVID-19 restrictions. Accelerometer outcomes included the following: overall physical activity, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), time spent inactive, days/week with ≥30-minute continuous MVPA and sleep. Predictors of change in physical activity taken pre-COVID included the following: age, sex, ethnicity, body mass index (BMI), socio-economic status and medical history. RESULTS: In all, 165 participants (age (mean±S.D = 64.2 ± 8.3 years, BMI=31.4 ± 5.4 kg/m2 , 45% women) were included. During restrictions, overall physical activity was lower by 1.7 mg (~800 steps/day) and inactive time 21.9 minutes/day higher, but time in MVPA and sleep did not statistically significantly change. In contrast, the percentage of people with ≥1 day/week with ≥30-minute continuous MVPA was higher (34% cf. 24%). Consistent predictors of lower physical activity and/or higher inactive time were higher BMI and/or being a woman. Being older and/or from ethnic minorities groups was associated with higher inactive time. CONCLUSIONS: Overall physical activity, but not MVPA, was lower in adults with type 2 diabetes during COVID-19 restrictions. Women and individuals who were heavier, older, inactive and/or from ethnic minority groups were most at risk of lower physical activity during restrictions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/physiopathology , Motor Activity/physiology , Sleep/physiology , Accelerometry , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Young Adult
15.
Int J Psychiatry Clin Pract ; 25(2): 164-171, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1091335

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Psychological burdens of the COVID-19 pandemic are likely to impact sleep negatively. We investigate prevalence and correlates of disturbed sleep among subscribers to Text4Hope a daily supportive text message program launched in Alberta to support residents to deal with stress, anxiety, and depression. METHODS: A survey link was sent to Text4Hope subscribers to assess demographic and clinical variables, including disturbed sleep, stress, anxiety, and depression using the third question on the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), Perceived Stress Scale, Generalised Anxiety Disorder 7-item scale, and PHQ-9, respectively. Data were analysed using univariate and logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: Overall, 6041 out of 32,805 Text4Hope subscribers completed the survey (18.4% response rate). Prevalence of disturbed sleep was 77.8%. Subscribers aged 41-60 years were twice as likely to present with sleep disturbance compared to individuals ≤25 years (OR 1.89, 95% CI: 1.27-2.81). Individuals with moderate/high anxiety and stress symptoms and those with passive death wish/suicidal ideation had higher probability for sleep disturbance [(OR 4.05, 95% CI: 3.33-4.93), (OR 2.42, 95% CI: 1.99-2.94), and (OR 2.39, 95% CI: 1.69-3.38)], respectively. CONCLUSION: As the pandemic continues, more Canadians are likely to develop sleep problems, an important consideration for planning mental health services.KEY POINTSThis is the first study to examine the prevalence rates and demographic and clinical correlates of disturbed sleep in a large sample (n = 6041) of Canadians during the COVID-19 pandemic.Prevalence of disturbed sleep was high at 77.8%.Individuals aged 41-60 years were twice as likely to present with sleep disturbance compared to individuals ≤25 years (OR 1.89, 95% CI: 1.27-2.81).Individuals with moderate/high anxiety symptoms, moderate/high stress symptoms, and suicidal ideation/thoughts of self-harm had higher likelihood of developing sleep disturbance, compared to individuals lacking these symptoms [(OR 4.05, 95% CI: 3.33-4.93) and (OR 2.42, 95% CI: 1.98-2.94)], respectively.As the pandemic continues, with fear of multiple waves, more Canadians are likely to develop sleep problems, an important consideration for planning the provision of mental health services.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Adult , Age Factors , Alberta/epidemiology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Risk Factors , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Suicidal Ideation , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
16.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(4)2021 02 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1085084

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, a survey was conducted using the questionnaire method among participants consisting of both ordinary people (n = 325) and frontline anti-epidemic medical staff (n = 310), and physiological data was obtained on the basis of physical examination. This study aimed to scrutinize the influence of Type A personality on the biochemical indicators of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and the behavioral indicators of appetite and sleep disorder, and to analyze the mediating effect of depression. Meanwhile, multiple-group path analysis was used to evaluate path differences between the models of two samples. The results of the mediation analysis for both samples demonstrated that depression significantly mediated the relationship between Type A personality and appetite and sleep disorder. The results of multiple-group path analysis showed that the relationship between Type A personality and appetite and sleep disorder seems to be significantly stronger in ordinary people, whereas the relationship between depression and appetite and sleep disorder, as well as with the path towards AST, seems to be significantly stronger in frontline anti-epidemic medical staff. This paper provides ideas for the selection and distribution of medical personnel based on personality characteristics in major public health emergencies, and physical and mental health status should be taken into account to provide relative health assistance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Medical Staff/psychology , Mental Health , Type A Personality , Appetite , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression , Humans , Pandemics , Physical Examination , Sleep Wake Disorders
17.
Obes Med ; 22: 100324, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1078109

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients infected with SARS-CoV-2- having pre-existing non-communicable diseases (NCDs)- are at a higher risk of complications. Obesity is one of the proven risk factors causing NCDs and can influence outcomes of COVID-19 patients. It is closely related to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The increased risk of COVID-19 and reduced access to treatment of non-COVID conditions during the pandemic may increase the stress in obese patients with OSA. This situation makes it necessary for them to cope with their condition by themselves. This review aimed at the effect of this pandemic on these patients and coping strategies for them. METHODS: Databases like PubMed and Scopus were searched using a combination of key words. Full-text articles meeting the inclusion criteria were selected. RESULTS: The search yielded eight studies, discussing about the potential interactions between the COVID-19, obesity and OSA, the impact of COVID-19 on them, and management of these patients. CONCLUSIONS: Increased prevalence of COVID-19 was found among obese patients with OSA. The fear of COVID-19 and shift of health care workers to manage COVID-19 patients has affected their regular visits to the hospital. However, there is lack of coping strategies for them, which should soon be established for these patients.

18.
Appl Nurs Res ; 59: 151412, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1077770

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The profession of nurses involves exposure to harmful agents. Despite numerous international studies on the occurrence of sleep disorders in nurses, most studies lacked an assessment of the dependence on the occurrence of the situation causing fear and anxiety which is a highly contagious. AIM: Determining the relationship between the occurrence of sleep disorders and socio-demographic variables of medical personnel during the COVID-19 epidemic. DESIGN: This is a cross-sectional study conducted online involving 336 health professionals. RESULTS: Insomnia among staff was determined at the level of Subthreshold insomnia and Clinical insomnia (moderate severity). Suspicion or confirmed COVID-19 had an effect on the occurrence of sleep disorders in the study group of medical personnel. CONCLUSION: Taking into account the statistical error of 6%, the sleep disorders concern about 40% of professionally active nurses and midwives in Poland. Worsening of insomnia was observed in people with the possibility of contact with a patient with COVID-19 in the workplace. Insomnia was more common in respondents over 25 years of age. Psychosocial interventions are needed to help healthcare staff better respond to COVID-19 and future epidemics.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/therapy , COVID-19/psychology , Fear/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/therapy , Adult , Age Factors , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Poland , SARS-CoV-2 , Socioeconomic Factors , Young Adult
19.
Epilepsy Behav ; 116: 107791, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1071999

ABSTRACT

Climate change is with us. As professionals who place value on evidence-based practice, climate change is something we cannot ignore. The current pandemic of the novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, has demonstrated how global crises can arise suddenly and have a significant impact on public health. Global warming, a chronic process punctuated by acute episodes of extreme weather events, is an insidious global health crisis needing at least as much attention. Many neurological diseases are complex chronic conditions influenced at many levels by changes in the environment. This review aimed to collate and evaluate reports from clinical and basic science about the relationship between climate change and epilepsy. The keywords climate change, seasonal variation, temperature, humidity, thermoregulation, biorhythm, gene, circadian rhythm, heat, and weather were used to search the published evidence. A number of climatic variables are associated with increased seizure frequency in people with epilepsy. Climate change-induced increase in seizure precipitants such as fevers, stress, and sleep deprivation (e.g. as a result of more frequent extreme weather events) or vector-borne infections may trigger or exacerbate seizures, lead to deterioration of seizure control, and affect neurological, cerebrovascular, or cardiovascular comorbidities and risk of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy. Risks are likely to be modified by many factors, ranging from individual genetic variation and temperature-dependent channel function, to housing quality and global supply chains. According to the results of the limited number of experimental studies with animal models of seizures or epilepsy, different seizure types appear to have distinct susceptibility to seasonal influences. Increased body temperature, whether in the context of fever or not, has a critical role in seizure threshold and seizure-related brain damage. Links between climate change and epilepsy are likely to be multifactorial, complex, and often indirect, which makes predictions difficult. We need more data on possible climate-driven altered risks for seizures, epilepsy, and epileptogenesis, to identify underlying mechanisms at systems, cellular, and molecular levels for better understanding of the impact of climate change on epilepsy. Further focussed data would help us to develop evidence for mitigation methods to do more to protect people with epilepsy from the effects of climate change.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Climate Change , Epilepsy/epidemiology , Global Health/trends , Public Health/trends , Animals , COVID-19/prevention & control , Death, Sudden , Epilepsy/therapy , Hot Temperature/adverse effects , Humans , Humidity/adverse effects , Sleep Deprivation/epidemiology , Sleep Deprivation/therapy , Weather
20.
BMJ Open Respir Res ; 8(1)2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066894

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is associated with higher body mass index (BMI), diabetes, older age and male gender, which are all risk factors for severe COVID-19.We aimed to study if OSA is an independent risk factor for COVID-19 infection or for severe COVID-19. METHODS: OSA diagnosis and COVID-19 infection were extracted from the hospital discharge, causes of death and infectious diseases registries in individuals who participated in the FinnGen study (n=260 405). Severe COVID-19 was defined as COVID-19 requiring hospitalisation. Multivariate logistic regression model was used to examine association. Comorbidities for either COVID-19 or OSA were selected as covariates. We performed a meta-analysis with previous studies. RESULTS: We identified 445 individuals with COVID-19, and 38 (8.5%) of them with OSA of whom 19 out of 91 (20.9%) were hospitalised. OSA associated with COVID-19 hospitalisation independent from age, sex, BMI and comorbidities (p-unadjusted=5.13×10-5, OR-adjusted=2.93 (95% CI 1.02 to 8.39), p-adjusted=0.045). OSA was not associated with the risk of contracting COVID-19 (p=0.25). A meta-analysis of OSA and severe COVID-19 showed association across 15 835 COVID-19 positive controls, and n=1294 patients with OSA with severe COVID-19 (OR=2.37 (95% 1.14 to 4.95), p=0.021). CONCLUSION: Risk for contracting COVID-19 was the same for patients with OSA and those without OSA. In contrast, among COVID-19 positive patients, OSA was associated with higher risk for hospitalisation. Our findings are in line with earlier works and suggest OSA as an independent risk factor for severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Sleep Apnea, Obstructive/epidemiology , Aged , Comorbidity , Female , Finland/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Registries , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
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