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1.
Int J Mol Sci ; 21(9)2020 Apr 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1934078

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) initiates the cytokine/chemokine storm-mediated lung injury. The SARS-CoV unique domain (SUD) with three macrodomains (N, M, and C), showing the G-quadruplex binding activity, was examined the possible role in SARS pathogenesis in this study. The chemokine profile analysis indicated that SARS-CoV SUD significantly up-regulated the expression of CXCL10, CCL5 and interleukin (IL)-1ß in human lung epithelial cells and in the lung tissues of the mice intratracheally instilled with the recombinant plasmids. Among the SUD subdomains, SUD-MC substantially activated AP-1-mediated CXCL10 expression in vitro. In the wild type mice, SARS-CoV SUD-MC triggered the pulmonary infiltration of macrophages and monocytes, inducing CXCL10-mediated inflammatory responses and severe diffuse alveolar damage symptoms. Moreover, SUD-MC actuated NOD-, LRR- and pyrin domain-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome-dependent pulmonary inflammation, as confirmed by the NLRP3 inflammasome inhibitor and the NLRP3-/- mouse model. This study demonstrated that SARS-CoV SUD modulated NLRP3 inflammasome-dependent CXCL10-mediated pulmonary inflammation, providing the potential therapeutic targets for developing the antiviral agents.


Subject(s)
Chemokine CXCL10/metabolism , Inflammasomes/metabolism , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/metabolism , SARS Virus/metabolism , Viral Proteins/metabolism , Animals , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/chemistry , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/immunology , Cell Line , Chemokine CXCL10/genetics , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , Monocytes/immunology , Monocytes/metabolism , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/deficiency , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/genetics , Pneumonia/pathology , Pneumonia/virology , Promoter Regions, Genetic , SARS Virus/isolation & purification , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/pathology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , Up-Regulation , Viral Proteins/chemistry , Viral Proteins/genetics
2.
J Med Virol ; 93(8): 5182-5187, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1298501

ABSTRACT

Infections due to human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) are frequent during early childhood. Usually, they have a favorable clinical course. Conversely, HHV-6 congenital infections occur in about 1% of neonates and may present with more severe clinical pictures. HHV-6 can be found in lung tissues and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples from patients with pneumonia and in immunocompromised patients can cause mild to severe pneumonia. In neonates, the role of HHV-6 in the genesis of severe pneumonia is poorly defined still now. We describe a healthy infant with a late-onset (15 days of life) severe interstitial pneumonia and heavy HHV-6 genome load, persistently detected in its BAL fluid. The baby underwent high-frequency oscillatory ventilation, hydroxychloroquine, steroids, and ganciclovir for 6 weeks and at 9 months she died. Next-generation sequencing of genes known to cause neonatal respiratory insufficiency revealed the presence of a "probably pathogenetic" heterozygous variant in the autosomal recessive DRC1 gene, a heterozygous variant of unknown significance (VUS) in the autosomal recessive RSPH9 gene, and a heterozygous VUS in the autosomal recessive MUC5B gene. HHV-6 infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of late-onset severe respiratory distress in neonates and the co-occurrence of genetic predisposing factors or modifiers should be tested by specific molecular techniques. The intensity of HHV-6 genome load in BAL fluid could be an indicator of the response to antiviral therapy.


Subject(s)
Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/genetics , Roseolovirus Infections/genetics , Cytoskeletal Proteins/genetics , Fatal Outcome , Female , Genetic Variation , Herpesvirus 6, Human/genetics , Herpesvirus 6, Human/isolation & purification , Heterozygote , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/therapy , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/virology , Microtubule-Associated Proteins/genetics , Mucin-5B/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Roseolovirus Infections/therapy , Roseolovirus Infections/virology , Viral Load
3.
Nature ; 595(7865): 114-119, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1207147

ABSTRACT

Respiratory failure is the leading cause of death in patients with severe SARS-CoV-2 infection1,2, but the host response at the lung tissue level is poorly understood. Here we performed single-nucleus RNA sequencing of about 116,000 nuclei from the lungs of nineteen individuals who died of COVID-19 and underwent rapid autopsy and seven control individuals. Integrated analyses identified substantial alterations in cellular composition, transcriptional cell states, and cell-to-cell interactions, thereby providing insight into the biology of lethal COVID-19. The lungs from individuals with COVID-19 were highly inflamed, with dense infiltration of aberrantly activated monocyte-derived macrophages and alveolar macrophages, but had impaired T cell responses. Monocyte/macrophage-derived interleukin-1ß and epithelial cell-derived interleukin-6 were unique features of SARS-CoV-2 infection compared to other viral and bacterial causes of pneumonia. Alveolar type 2 cells adopted an inflammation-associated transient progenitor cell state and failed to undergo full transition into alveolar type 1 cells, resulting in impaired lung regeneration. Furthermore, we identified expansion of recently described CTHRC1+ pathological fibroblasts3 contributing to rapidly ensuing pulmonary fibrosis in COVID-19. Inference of protein activity and ligand-receptor interactions identified putative drug targets to disrupt deleterious circuits. This atlas enables the dissection of lethal COVID-19, may inform our understanding of long-term complications of COVID-19 survivors, and provides an important resource for therapeutic development.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Lung/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Single-Cell Analysis , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/pathology , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/virology , Atlases as Topic , Autopsy , COVID-19/immunology , Case-Control Studies , Female , Fibroblasts/pathology , Fibrosis/pathology , Fibrosis/virology , Humans , Inflammation/pathology , Inflammation/virology , Macrophages/pathology , Macrophages/virology , Macrophages, Alveolar/pathology , Macrophages, Alveolar/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Plasma Cells/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
4.
Virol J ; 18(1): 46, 2021 02 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1105717

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is caused by SARS-CoV-2 and broke out as a global pandemic in late 2019. The acidic pH environment of endosomes is believed to be essential for SARS-CoV-2 to be able to enter cells and begin replication. However, the clinical use of endosomal acidification inhibitors, typically chloroquine, has been controversial with this respect. METHODS: In this study, RT-qPCR method was used to detect the SARS-CoV-2N gene to evaluate viral replication. The CCK-8 assay was also used to evaluate the cytotoxic effect of SARS-CoV-2. In situ hybridization was used to examine the distribution of the SARS-CoV-2 gene in lung tissues. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was also used to evaluate virus-associated pathological changes in lung tissues. RESULTS: In this study, analysis showed that endosomal acidification inhibitors, including chloroquine, bafilomycin A1 and NH4CL, significantly reduced the viral yields of SARS-CoV-2 in Vero E6, Huh-7 and 293T-ACE2 cells. Chloroquine and bafilomycin A1 also improved the viability and proliferation of Vero E6 cells after SARS-CoV-2 infection. Moreover, in the hACE2 transgenic mice model of SARS-CoV-2 infection, chloroquine and bafilomycin A1 reduced viral replication in lung tissues and alleviated viral pneumonia with reduced inflammatory exudation and infiltration in peribronchiolar and perivascular tissues, as well as improved structures of alveolar septum and pulmonary alveoli. CONCLUSIONS: Our research investigated the antiviral effects of endosomal acidification inhibitors against SARS-CoV-2 in several infection models and provides an experimental basis for further mechanistic studies and drug development.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Endosomes/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Replication/drug effects , Ammonium Chloride/pharmacology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Cell Survival/drug effects , Chlorocebus aethiops , Chloroquine/pharmacology , Endosomes/metabolism , Female , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , Lung/pathology , Macrolides/pharmacology , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , Random Allocation , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Vero Cells
5.
Int Immunopharmacol ; 92: 107307, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-988108

ABSTRACT

Severe forms of COVID-19 can evolve into pneumonia, featured by acute respiratory failure due to acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In viral diseases, the replication of viruses is seemingly stimulated by an imbalance between pro-oxidant and antioxidant activity as well as by the deprivation of antioxidant mechanisms. In COVID-19 pneumonia, oxidative stress also appears to be highly detrimental to lung tissues. Although inhaling ozone (O3) gas has been shown to be toxic to the lungs, recent evidence suggests that its administration via appropriate routes and at small doses can paradoxically induce an adaptive reaction capable of decreasing the endogenous oxidative stress. Ozone therapy is recommended to counter the disruptive effects of severe COVID-19 on lung tissues, especially if administered in early stages of the disease, thereby preventing the progression to ARDS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Oxidants, Photochemical/therapeutic use , Ozone/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans
6.
PLoS Pathog ; 16(11): e1008949, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-922716

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 has emerged as an epidemic, causing severe pneumonia with a high infection rate globally. To better understand the pathogenesis caused by SARS-CoV-2, we developed a rhesus macaque model to mimic natural infection via the nasal route, resulting in the SARS-CoV-2 virus shedding in the nose and stool up to 27 days. Importantly, we observed the pathological progression of marked interstitial pneumonia in the infected animals on 5-7 dpi, with virus dissemination widely occurring in the lower respiratory tract and lymph nodes, and viral RNA was consistently detected from 5 to 21 dpi. During the infection period, the kinetics response of T cells was revealed to contribute to COVID-19 progression. Our findings implied that the antiviral response of T cells was suppressed after 3 days post infection, which might be related to increases in the Treg cell population in PBMCs. Moreover, two waves of the enhanced production of cytokines (TGF-α, IL-4, IL-6, GM-CSF, IL-10, IL-15, IL-1ß), chemokines (MCP-1/CCL2, IL-8/CXCL8, and MIP-1ß/CCL4) were detected in lung tissue. Our data collected from this model suggested that T cell response and cytokine/chemokine changes in lung should be considered as evaluation parameters for COVID-19 treatment and vaccine development, besides of observation of virus shedding and pathological analysis.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Animals , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokines/immunology , Disease Models, Animal , Lung/immunology , Lung/pathology , Macaca mulatta , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Viral Load/methods , Virulence , Virus Shedding
7.
MedComm (2020) ; 1(2): 157-164, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-697152

ABSTRACT

Since the end of December 2019, a novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 began to spread, an infection disease termed COVID-19. The virus has spread throughout the world in a short period of time, resulting in a pandemic. The number of reported cases in global reached 5 695 596 including 352 460 deaths, as of May 27, 2020. Due to the lack of effective treatment options for COVID-19, various strategies are being tested. Recently, pathologic studies conducted by two teams in China revealed immunopathologic abnormalities in lung tissue. These results have implications for immunotherapy that could offer a novel therapy strategy for combating lethal viral pneumonia. This review discusses the clinical and pathological features of COVID-19, the roles of immune cells in pathological processes, and the possible avenues for induction of immunosuppressive T regulatory cells attenuating lung inflammation due to viral infection. It is our hope that these proposals may both be helpful in understanding the novel features of SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia as well as providing new immunological strategies for treating the severe sequelae of disease manifestations seen in people infected with SARS-CoV-2.

8.
bioRxiv ; 2020 Jul 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-665969

ABSTRACT

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus -2 (SARS-CoV-2) emerged in late 2019 and has spread worldwide resulting in the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Although animal models have been evaluated for SARS-CoV-2 infection, none have recapitulated the severe lung disease phenotypes seen in hospitalized human cases. Here, we evaluate heterozygous transgenic mice expressing the human ACE2 receptor driven by the epithelial cell cytokeratin-18 gene promoter (K18-hACE2) as a model of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Intranasal inoculation of SARS-CoV-2 in K18-hACE2 mice results in high levels of viral infection in lung tissues with additional spread to other organs. Remarkably, a decline in pulmonary function, as measured by static and dynamic tests of respiratory capacity, occurs 4 days after peak viral titer and correlates with an inflammatory response marked by infiltration into the lung of monocytes, neutrophils, and activated T cells resulting in pneumonia. Cytokine profiling and RNA sequencing analysis of SARS-CoV-2-infected lung tissues show a massively upregulated innate immune response with prominent signatures of NF-kB-dependent, type I and II interferon signaling, and leukocyte activation pathways. Thus, the K18-hACE2 model of SARS-CoV-2 infection recapitulates many features of severe COVID-19 infection in humans and can be used to define the mechanistic basis of lung disease and test immune and antiviral-based countermeasures.

9.
Sci Adv ; 6(24): eaba8399, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-617060

ABSTRACT

Developing a vaccine to protect against the lethal effects of the many strains of coronavirus is critical given the current global pandemic. For Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), we show that rhesus macaques seroconverted rapidly after a single intramuscular vaccination with ChAdOx1 MERS. The vaccine protected against respiratory injury and pneumonia and reduced viral load in lung tissue by several orders of magnitude. MERS-CoV replication in type I and II pneumocytes of ChAdOx1 MERS-vaccinated animals was absent. A prime-boost regimen of ChAdOx1 MERS boosted antibody titers, and viral replication was completely absent from the respiratory tract tissue of these rhesus macaques. We also found that antibodies elicited by ChAdOx1 MERS in rhesus macaques neutralized six different MERS-CoV strains. Transgenic human dipeptidyl peptidase 4 mice vaccinated with ChAdOx1 MERS were completely protected against disease and lethality for all different MERS-CoV strains. The data support further clinical development of ChAdOx1 MERS.


Subject(s)
Immunogenicity, Vaccine/immunology , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccination , Viral Vaccines/administration & dosage , Viral Vaccines/therapeutic use , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4/genetics , Female , Humans , Injections, Intramuscular , Macaca mulatta , Male , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome , Vaccines, DNA , Viral Vaccines/immunology , Virus Replication/immunology
10.
Med Hypotheses ; 144: 110020, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-608981

ABSTRACT

Pulmonary surfactant is considered to be one of the soaps. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and the other enveloped viruses become very weak against surfactant. The SARS virus binds to angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE2) receptor and causes pneumonia. In the lung, the ACE2 receptor sits on the top of lung cells known as alveolar epithelial type II (AE2) cells. These cells play an important role in producing surfactant. Pulmonary surfactant is believed to regulate the alveolar surface tension in mammalian lungs. To our knowledge, AE2 cells are believed to act as immunoregulatory cells; however, pulmonary surfactant itself has not been believed to act as a defender against the enveloped viruses. This study hypothesises that pulmonary surfactant may be a strong defender of enveloped viruses. Therefore, old coronaviruses merely cause pneumonia. On the contrary, new SARS-CoV-2 can suppress the production of surfactant that binds to the ACE2 of AE2 cells. The coronavirus can survive in the lung tissue because of the exhaustion of pulmonary surfactant.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pulmonary Surfactants/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Ambroxol/therapeutic use , Bromhexine/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Clinical Trials as Topic , Crystallography, X-Ray , Humans , Models, Theoretical , Phagocytosis , Pregnenediones/therapeutic use , Pulmonary Alveoli/metabolism , Surface Tension , Surface-Active Agents
11.
Eur J Pharm Sci ; 147: 105290, 2020 Apr 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-3102

ABSTRACT

Dehydroandrographolide succinate (DAS) injection, which was approved in China for the treatment of viral pneumonia and upper respiratory tract infections, is often off-label used for nebulization therapy to avoid the adverse drug reactions associated with the injection. However, the aerodynamic properties and pulmonary fate of nebulized DAS was largely uninvestigated. In this study, the main objectives were to evaluate the in vitro aerodynamic deposition profiles of nebulizer generated aerosols and comparatively investigate the local drug availability and anti-inflammatory efficacy of DAS between intratracheal and intravenous dosing. The in vitro evaluation of aerodynamic characteristics and droplet size distribution showed more than 50% aerosol particles with size being <5 µm, allowing the aerosols to reach the lower respiratory tract. Following intratracheal administration, the drug underwent pulmonary absorption into the bloodstream, rendering an absolute bioavailability of 47.3%. Compared to the intravenous delivery, the intratracheal administration dramatically increased the drug availability in the lung tissue in rats by more than 80-fold, leading to an improved and prolonged local anti-inflammatory efficacy in a lipopolysaccharide induced lung injury model in mice. The present results demonstrated that inhalation delivery of DAS is a convenient and effective alternative to intravenous injections.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/administration & dosage , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacokinetics , Diterpenes/administration & dosage , Diterpenes/pharmacokinetics , Pneumonia/drug therapy , Administration, Inhalation , Administration, Intravenous , Aerosols/administration & dosage , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/blood , Biological Availability , Diterpenes/blood , Lung/drug effects , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Models, Animal , Nebulizers and Vaporizers , Rats , Rats, Wistar
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