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1.
Egypt Heart J ; 72: 58, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098496

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Wellens' syndrome is known to be associated with left anterior descending artery occlusion that could lead to an extensive anterior wall myocardial infarction. Thus, emergency cardiac catheterization is needed. However, during coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, it is recommended for hemodynamically stable acute coronary syndrome patients with COVID-19 infection to be treated conservatively in an isolated hospital ward. CASE PRESENTATION: We report an 85-year-old patient with chief complaints of typical, squeezing chest pain in the past 4 h. The patient had a high fever, dyspnea, sore throat, and fatigue for 3 days. He had previously come into contact with COVID-19 positive relatives. The patient was hemodynamically stable and pulmonary auscultation revealed coarse rales in the entire lung. Electrocardiography (ECG) evaluation during the pain episode showed non-specific ST-T changes in lead V2-V5. After sublingual nitrate was administered, ECG evaluation during the pain-free period revealed a biphasic T wave inversion in lead V2 and V3. Laboratory workup showed elevated cardiac marker and leucopenia with neutrophilia and lymphopenia. Rapid immunochromatographic test and initial severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) evaluation from nasopharyngeal swab showed negative results. However, radiographic evaluations suggest the diagnosis of COVID-19 infection. While waiting for the second RT-PCR evaluation, the patient was diagnosed with Wellens' syndrome with suspected COVID-19 infection. The patient was treated conservatively according to national guidelines and scheduled for elective cardiac catheterization. On the third day, the patient felt better and insisted on being discharged home. Ten days after discharged, the patient died of myocardial infarction. CONCLUSION: Emergency cardiac catheterization should be done for patient with Wellens' syndrome, regardless of the COVID-19 infection status.

2.
J Allergy Clin Immunol ; 147(1): 81-91, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2095538

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe immunopathology may drive the deleterious manifestations that are observed in the advanced stages of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) but are poorly understood. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to phenotype leukocyte subpopulations and the cytokine milieu in the lungs and blood of critically ill patients with COVID-19 acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). METHODS: We consecutively included patients less than 72 hours after intubation following informed consent from their next of kin. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was evaluated by microscopy; bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and blood were assessed by 10-color flow cytometry and a multiplex cytokine panel. RESULTS: Four mechanically ventilated patients (aged 40-75 years) with moderate-to-severe COVID-19 ARDS were included. Immature neutrophils dominated in both blood and lungs, whereas CD4 and CD8 T-cell lymphopenia was observed in the 2 compartments. However, regulatory T cells and TH17 cells were found in higher fractions in the lung. Lung CD4 and CD8 T cells and macrophages expressed an even higher upregulation of activation markers than in blood. A wide range of cytokines were expressed at high levels both in the blood and in the lungs, most notably, IL-1RA, IL-6, IL-8, IP-10, and monocyte chemoattactant protein-1, consistent with hyperinflammation. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 ARDS exhibits a distinct immunologic profile in the lungs, with a depleted and exhausted CD4 and CD8 T-cell population that resides within a heavily hyperinflammatory milieu.


Subject(s)
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Lung/immunology , Lymphopenia/immunology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Th17 Cells/immunology , Adult , Aged , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/pathology , COVID-19/pathology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Cytokines/immunology , Female , Humans , Immunophenotyping , Lung/pathology , Lymphopenia/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , Th17 Cells/pathology
3.
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol ; 41(7): 820-825, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096308

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Patients with COVID-19 may present with respiratory syndromes indistinguishable from those caused by common viruses. Early isolation and containment is challenging. Although screening all patients with respiratory symptoms for COVID-19 has been recommended, the practicality of such an effort has yet to be assessed. METHODS: Over a 6-week period during a SARS-CoV-2 outbreak, our institution introduced a "respiratory surveillance ward" (RSW) to segregate all patients with respiratory symptoms in designated areas, where appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) could be utilized until SARS-CoV-2 testing was done. Patients could be transferred when SARS-CoV-2 tests were negative on 2 consecutive occasions, 24 hours apart. RESULTS: Over the study period, 1,178 patients were admitted to the RSWs. The mean length-of-stay (LOS) was 1.89 days (SD, 1.23). Among confirmed cases of pneumonia admitted to the RSW, 5 of 310 patients (1.61%) tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. This finding was comparable to the pickup rate from our isolation ward. In total, 126 HCWs were potentially exposed to these cases; however, only 3 (2.38%) required quarantine because most used appropriate PPE. In addition, 13 inpatients overlapped with the index cases during their stay in the RSW; of these 13 exposed inpatients, 1 patient subsequently developed COVID-19 after exposure. No patient-HCW transmission was detected despite intensive surveillance. CONCLUSIONS: Our institution successfully utilized the strategy of an RSW over a 6-week period to contain a cluster of COVID-19 cases and to prevent patient-HCW transmission. However, this method was resource-intensive in terms of testing and bed capacity.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Cross Infection/transmission , Infection Control/methods , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Patient Isolation , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Population Surveillance/methods , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cross Infection/diagnosis , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Early Diagnosis , Female , Humans , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patients' Rooms/organization & administration , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Singapore , Symptom Assessment , Tertiary Care Centers
4.
Curr Probl Cardiol ; 46(3): 100715, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2095230

ABSTRACT

The World Health Organization (WHO) announced that the novel coronavirus pneumonia pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2 was classified as a public health emergency of international concern on January 30, 2020 Egypt's health ministry had announced the first case in the country at Cairo International Airport involving a Chinese national on 14 February 2020. Case decisions in the cath labs should be individualized, taking into account the risk of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) exposure versus the risk of delay in diagnosis or therapy. In patients with known or suspected COVID-19 and ischemic heart disease, the balance of staff exposure and patient benefit will need to be weighed carefully. AIM OF THE WORK: Analyzing and assessing the impact of COVID 19 pandemic on the: (1) volume, type of patients, and the different procedures performed. (2) The changes in management trends of cardiologists in the cath labs. RESULTS: This study has surveyed 30 cath labs distributed all over Egypt during COVID-19 pandemic with 43.35% in urban area and 56.7% in rural areas. Only 63.3% of surveyed centers were well equipped to deal with COVID-19 active patients and full personal protective equipment was worn in only 6.7% of patients. A decrease in the volume of new acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients, ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients and primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) was recorded in 80%, 83%, and 80% of the surveyed centers respectively. Regarding the delay in the invasive management for patients with ACS due to diagnostic testing, there was 100% delay in all surveyed centers with 70% of centers suffering from delay in primary PCI due to awaited testing. On the other hand, there was a decrease in the volume of patients receiving elective procedures in 83.3% of cath labs. CONCLUSION: The management trends in the current Egyptian survey were significantly impacted during COVID-19 pandemic. Primary PCI volume much reduced and takes longer time than should be.


Subject(s)
Acute Coronary Syndrome/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiac Catheterization/methods , Disease Management , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Acute Coronary Syndrome/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Egypt/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology
5.
Minerva Cardiol Angiol ; 70(4): 468-475, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1975634

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Northern Italy has been one of the most affected area in the world by the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The healthcare system has been overwhelmed by the huge number of patients in need of mechanical ventilation or intensive care, resulting in a delay of treatment of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), due to a crash in STEMI networks and closure of a certain number of hub centers, and to a delay in patients' seeking for medical evaluation for chest pain or angina-equivalent symptoms. METHODS: In the Trentino region, a mountainous area with about 500,000 inhabitants, very close to Lombardy that was the epicenter of the pandemic in Italy, to avoid these dramatic consequences, we developed a new protocol tailored to our specificity to keep our institution, and above all the cath-lab, clean from the SARS-CoV-2 infection, to ensure full operativity for cardiologic emergencies. RESULTS: Applying this protocol during the two months of the peak of the infection in Italy no one of the staff members of the cath-lab, the ICCU or the cardiology ward tested positive to nasal swab for SARS-CoV-2 and the same result was obtained for all the patients admitted to our units. CONCLUSIONS: Our real-world experience shows that during the COVID-19 pandemic, quick activation of an appropriate protocol defining specific pathways for patients with a medical urgency is effective in minimizing healthcare personnel exposure and to preserve full operativity of the hub centers. This issue will be of a crucial importance, now that we are facing the second wave of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy
6.
Anaesthesist ; 70(Suppl 1): 19-29, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1958962

ABSTRACT

Since December 2019 a novel coronavirus (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, SARS-CoV-2) has rapidly spread around the world resulting in an acute respiratory illness pandemic. The immense challenges for clinicians and hospitals as well as the strain on many healthcare systems has been unprecedented.The majority of patients present with mild symptoms of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19); however, 5-8% become critically ill and require intensive care treatment. Acute hypoxemic respiratory failure with severe dyspnea and an increased respiratory rate (>30/min) usually leads to intensive care unit (ICU) admission. At this point bilateral pulmonary infiltrates are typically seen. Patients often develop a severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).So far, remdesivir and dexamethasone have shown clinical effectiveness in severe COVID-19 in hospitalized patients. The main goal of supportive treatment is to ascertain adequate oxygenation. Invasive mechanical ventilation and repeated prone positioning are key elements in treating severely hypoxemic COVID-19 patients.Strict adherence to basic infection control measures (including hand hygiene) and correct use of personal protection equipment (PPE) are essential in the care of patients. Procedures that lead to formation of aerosols should be carried out with utmost precaution and preparation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Critical Illness , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Curr Opin Crit Care ; 27(3): 303-310, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1956610

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Assess the most recent studies using driving pressure (DP) as a monitoring technique under mechanical ventilation and describe the technical challenges associated with its measurement. RECENT FINDINGS: DP is consistently associated with survival in acute respiratory failure and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and can detect patients at higher risk of ventilator-induced lung injury. Its measurement can be challenged by leaks and ventilator dyssynchrony, but is also feasible under pressure support ventilation. Interestingly, an aggregated summary of published results suggests that its level is on average slightly lower in patients with coronavirus disease-19 induced ARDS than in classical ARDS. SUMMARY: The DP is easy to obtain and should be incorporated as a minimal monitoring technique under mechanical ventilation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Respiratory Insufficiency , Humans , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Respiratory Insufficiency/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Int J Mol Sci ; 21(14)2020 Jul 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1934087

ABSTRACT

Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) are characterized by an inflammatory response, alveolar edema, and hypoxemia. ARDS occurs most often in the settings of pneumonia, sepsis, aspiration of gastric contents, or severe trauma. The prevalence of ARDS is approximately 10% in patients of intensive care. There is no effective remedy with mortality high at 30-40%. Most functional proteins are dynamic and stringently governed by ubiquitin proteasomal degradation. Protein ubiquitination is reversible, the covalently attached monoubiquitin or polyubiquitin moieties within the targeted protein can be removed by a group of enzymes called deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs). Deubiquitination plays an important role in the pathobiology of ALI/ARDS as it regulates proteins critical in engagement of the alveolo-capillary barrier and in the inflammatory response. In this review, we provide an overview of how DUBs emerge in pathogen-induced pulmonary inflammation and related aspects in ALI/ARDS. Better understanding of deubiquitination-relatedsignaling may lead to novel therapeutic approaches by targeting specific elements of the deubiquitination pathways.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/metabolism , Deubiquitinating Enzymes/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/metabolism , Animals , Humans , Pneumonia/metabolism , Signal Transduction/physiology , Ubiquitin/metabolism , Ubiquitination/physiology
9.
EJHaem ; 1(1): 374-375, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1898851

ABSTRACT

We present a patient with SARS-CoV-2 infection, with an unexpected presence of lymphocytosis. Examination of blood film revealed mature small lymphocytes associated with high percentage of smudge cells (63%). A peripheral flow cyometry evidenced a CD5 negative CLL. A high percentage of smudge cells is associated with CLL diagnosis and has an important prognostic value: better survival and prolonged time to first treatment. It is a useful index in developing countries with low access to molecular testing.

10.
Endocrinol Diabetes Metab ; 4(1): e00176, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1898651

ABSTRACT

Background: Obesity accompanied by excess ectopic fat storage has been postulated as a risk factor for severe disease in people with SARS-CoV-2 through the stimulation of inflammation, functional immunologic deficit and a pro-thrombotic disseminated intravascular coagulation with associated high rates of venous thromboembolism. Methods: Observational studies in COVID-19 patients reporting data on raised body mass index at admission and associated clinical outcomes were identified from MEDLINE, Embase, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library up to 16 May 2020. Mean differences and relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were aggregated using random effects models. Results: Eight retrospective cohort studies and one cohort prospective cohort study with data on of 4,920 patients with COVID-19 were eligible. Comparing BMI ≥ 25 vs <25 kg/m2, the RRs (95% CIs) of severe illness and mortality were 2.35 (1.43-3.86) and 3.52 (1.32-9.42), respectively. In a pooled analysis of three studies, the RR (95% CI) of severe illness comparing BMI > 35 vs <25 kg/m2 was 7.04 (2.72-18.20). High levels of statistical heterogeneity were partly explained by age; BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 was associated with an increased risk of severe illness in older age groups (≥60 years), whereas the association was weaker in younger age groups (<60 years). Conclusions: Excess adiposity is a risk factor for severe disease and mortality in people with SARS-CoV-2 infection. This was particularly pronounced in people 60 and older. The increased risk of worse outcomes from SARS-CoV-2 infection in people with excess adiposity should be taken into account when considering individual and population risks and when deciding on which groups to target for public health messaging on prevention and detection measures. Systematic review registration: PROSPERO 2020: CRD42020179783.

11.
Clin Exp Rheumatol ; 39 Suppl 132(5): 47-50, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1870428

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: We aimed to assess the prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 infection among Behçet's syndrome (BS) patients, evaluating the possible association between demographic and clinical features and the risk of infection. Moreover, we aimed to evaluate the possible association between BS disease activity and treatment, and the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection. METHODS: A survey was conducted on BS patients followed at the Behçet's Centre of the Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy. We further evaluated the possible association between BS disease activity and treatment, and the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection. RESULTS: Out of 335 BS patients contacted, fourteen cases of SARS-CoV-2 were identified between April 1st, 2020 and February 9th, 2021, suggesting a prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 infection among BS patients of 4.2%, in line with the data of the general population in Italy (4.4%). When comparing clinical features between SARS-CoV-2 cases and matched SARS-CoV-2 negative BS patients, we found that the presence of different disease manifestations did not significantly differ between the two groups. SARS-CoV-2 cases and controls were also comparable in terms of immunosuppressive therapy, with the only exception of corticosteroids (71.4% vs. 35.7%, p=0.030), whose daily dose was significantly higher in cases than controls [5mg/day (IQR 0-10,) vs. 0 mg/day (IQR 0-5), p=0.005], suggesting that the right timing of usage and the more appropriate dosage of corticosteroid are a key question for the better management of these patients. CONCLUSIONS: Based on our results, patients with BS do not seem to be at a greater risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection or severe complications compared with the general population.


Subject(s)
Behcet Syndrome , COVID-19 , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Behcet Syndrome/diagnosis , Behcet Syndrome/drug therapy , Behcet Syndrome/epidemiology , Humans , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Minerva Med ; 113(2): 281-290, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1847990

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The efficacy and safety of continuous positive airway pressure and respiratory physiotherapy outside the Intensive Care Unit during a pandemic. METHODS: In this cohort study performed in February-May 2020 in a large teaching hospital in Milan, COVID-19 patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome receiving continuous positive airway pressure (positive end-expiratory pressure =10 cm H2O, FiO2=0.6, daily treatment duration: 4×3h-cycles) and respiratory physiotherapy including pronation outside the Intensive Care Unit were followed-up. RESULTS: Of 90 acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) patients treated with continuous positive airway pressure (45/90, 50% pronated at least once) outside the Intensive Care Unit and with a median (interquartile) follow-up of 37 (11-46) days, 45 (50%) were discharged at home, 28 (31%) were still hospitalized, and 17 (19%) died. Continuous positive airway pressure failure was recorded for 35 (39%) patients. Patient mobilization was associated with reduced failure rates (P=0.033). No safety issues were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Continuous positive airway pressure with patient mobilization (including pronation) was effective and safe in patients with ARDS due to COVID-19 managed outside the Intensive Care Unit setting during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Cohort Studies , Continuous Positive Airway Pressure , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Pronation , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy
13.
Minerva Cardiol Angiol ; 70(3): 303-309, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1841790

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Lombardy region, in Northern Italy, suffered a major outbreak of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) at the end of February 2020. The health system was rapidly overwhelmed by the pandemic. It became evident that patients suffering from time-sensitive medical emergencies like stroke, cerebral hemorrhage, trauma and acute myocardial infarction required timely, effective and safe pathways to be treated. The problem was addressed by a regional decree that created a hub-and-spoke system for time-sensitive medical emergencies. METHODS: We report the re-organizational changes adopted at a hub hospital (despite having already destined to COVID-19 patients most resources), and the number of emergent procedures for medical emergencies on the first 30-day of activity. These data were compared with the hospital activity in the same period of the previous year. RESULTS: Organizational changes were implemented in few hours. Dedicated pathways for non-COVID-19 patients affected by a medical emergency were set up in the emergency department, in the labs and in the operating theater. Ten intensive beds were implemented from a high-dependency unit; two operating rooms were reserved 24 h/day to neurosurgical or trauma emergencies. The number of emergent procedures was not different from that of the previous year, no admission refusal, no treatment delay and no viral transmission to the treated patients were recorded. No viral transmission to health care workers was observed. CONCLUSIONS: Re-organization of a hospital in order to adopt a hub-and-spoke model resulted feasible and allowed to face acute coronary syndrome and other time-sensitive medical emergencies timely and safely.


Subject(s)
Acute Coronary Syndrome , COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergencies , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
14.
J Atheroscler Thromb ; 29(5): 597-607, 2022 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1818582

ABSTRACT

AIM: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has left negative spillover effects on the entire health care system. Previous studies have suggested significant declines in cases of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We performed a quasi-experimental, retrospective cohort study of ACS hospitalisations by using a multi-institutional administrative claims database in Japan. We used interrupted time series analyses to ascertain impacts on cases, treatment approaches, and in-hospital mortality before and after Japan's state of emergency to respond to COVID-19. The primary outcome was the change in ACS cases per week. RESULTS: A total of 30,198 ACS cases (including 21,612 acute myocardial infarction and 8,586 unstable angina) were confirmed between 1st July 2018 and 30th June 2020. After the state of emergency, an immediate decrease was observed in ACS cases per week (-18.3%; 95% confidence interval, -13.1 to -23.5%). No significant differences were found in the severity of Killip classification (P=0.51) or cases of fibrinolytic therapy (P=0.74). The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on in-hospital mortality in ACS patients was no longer observed after adjustment for clinical characteristics (adjusted odds ratio, 0.93; 95% confidence interval, 0.78 to 1.12; P=0.49). CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrated the characteristics and trends of ACS cases in a Japanese population by applying interrupted time series analyses. Our findings provide significant insights into the association between COVID-19 and decreases in ACS hospitalisations during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Acute Coronary Syndrome , COVID-19 , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , Acute Coronary Syndrome/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies
15.
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr ; 85(2): 123-126, 2020 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1806747

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 disease has spread globally and was declared a pandemic on March 11, 2020, by the World Health Organization. On March 10, the State of Michigan confirmed its first 2 cases of COVID-19, and the number of confirmed cases has reached 47,182 as of May 11, 2020, with 4555 deaths. SETTING: Currently, little is known if patients living with HIV (PLWH) are at a higher risk of severe COVID-19 or if their antiretrovirals are protective. This study presents epidemiologic and clinical features of COVID-19 infected PLWH in Detroit, Michigan. METHODS: This is a case series that included 14 PLWH with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 infection who were evaluated at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, Michigan, between March 20, 2020, and April 30, 2020. RESULTS: Fourteen PLWH were diagnosed with COVID-19. Twelve patients were men and 2 were women; 13 patients were virally suppressed. Eight patients were hospitalized, and 6 patients were told to self-quarantine at home after their diagnoses. Three patients who were admitted expired during their hospital stay. No patient required bilevel positive airway pressure or nebulizer use in the emergency department, and none developed acute respiratory distress syndrome, pulmonary embolism, deep venous thrombosis, or a cytokine storm while on therapy for COVID-19. CONCLUSION: Although the clinical spectrum of COVID-19 among PLWH cannot be fully ascertained by this report, it adds to the data that suggest that HIV-positive patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection are not at a greater risk of severe disease or death as compared to HIV-negative patients.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , HIV Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , African Americans , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/ethnology , Female , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/ethnology , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/ethnology
16.
Tanaffos ; 19(4): 291-299, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1801409

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Inflammatory mediators are an important component in the pathophysiology of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). This study aimed to assess the effects of reducing inflammatory mediators using hemoperfusion (HP) and continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) on the mortality of patients with COVID-19. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twelve patients with confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19 were included. All patients had acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Patients were divided into three groups, namely, HP, CRRT and HP+CRRT. The primary outcome was mortality and the secondary outcomes were oxygenation and reduction in inflammatory mediators at the end of the study. RESULTS: Patients were not different at baseline in demographics, inflammatory cytokine levels, and the level of acute phase reactants. Half of the patients (3 out of 6) in the HP+CRRT group survived along with the survival of one patient (1 out of 2) in the HP group. All four patients in the CRRT group died. Serum creatinine (SCr), Interleukin-1 (IL1), Interleukin-6 (IL6), Interleukin-8 (IL8), partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2), O2 saturation (O2 sat), and hemodynamic parameters improved over time in HP+CRRT and CRRT groups, but no significant difference was observed in the HP group (All Ps > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Combined HP and CRRT demonstrated the best result in terms of mortality, reduction of inflammatory mediators and oxygenation. Further investigations are needed to explore the role of HP+CRRT in COVID-19 patients.

17.
Crit Care Explor ; 2(9): e0202, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1795075

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Patients with coronavirus disease 2019 acute respiratory distress syndrome appear to present with at least two distinct phenotypes: severe hypoxemia with relatively well-preserved lung compliance and lung gas volumes (type 1) and a more conventional acute respiratory distress syndrome phenotype, displaying the typical characteristics of the "baby lung" (type 2). We aimed to test plausible hypotheses regarding the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying coronavirus disease 2019 acute respiratory distress syndrome and to evaluate the resulting implications for ventilatory management. DESIGN: We adapted a high-fidelity computational simulator, previously validated in several studies of acute respiratory distress syndrome, to: 1) develop quantitative insights into the key pathophysiologic differences between the coronavirus disease 2019 acute respiratory distress syndrome and the conventional acute respiratory distress syndrome and 2) assess the impact of different positive end-expiratory pressure, Fio2, and tidal volume settings. SETTING: Interdisciplinary Collaboration in Systems Medicine Research Network. SUBJECTS: The simulator was calibrated to represent coronavirus disease 2019 acute respiratory distress syndrome patients with both normal and elevated body mass indices undergoing invasive mechanical ventilation. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: An acute respiratory distress syndrome model implementing disruption of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and vasodilation leading to hyperperfusion of collapsed lung regions failed to replicate clinical data on type 1 coronavirus disease 2019 acute respiratory distress syndrome patients. Adding mechanisms to reflect disruption of alveolar gas-exchange due to the effects of pneumonitis and heightened vascular resistance due to the emergence of microthrombi produced levels of ventilation perfusion mismatch and hypoxemia consistent with data from type 1 coronavirus disease 2019 acute respiratory distress syndrome patients, while preserving close-to-normal lung compliance and gas volumes. Atypical responses to positive end-expiratory pressure increments between 5 and 15 cm H2O were observed for this type 1 coronavirus disease 2019 acute respiratory distress syndrome model across a range of measures: increasing positive end-expiratory pressure resulted in reduced lung compliance and no improvement in oxygenation, whereas mechanical power, driving pressure, and plateau pressure all increased. Fio2 settings based on acute respiratory distress syndrome network protocols at different positive end-expiratory pressure levels were insufficient to achieve adequate oxygenation. Incrementing tidal volumes from 5 to 10 mL/kg produced similar increases in multiple indicators of ventilator-induced lung injury in the type 1 coronavirus disease 2019 acute respiratory distress syndrome model to those seen in a conventional acute respiratory distress syndrome model. CONCLUSIONS: Our model suggests that use of standard positive end-expiratory pressure/Fio2 tables, higher positive end-expiratory pressure strategies, and higher tidal volumes may all be potentially deleterious in type 1 coronavirus disease 2019 acute respiratory distress syndrome patients, and that a highly personalized approach to treatment is advisable.

18.
Crit Care Explor ; 2(9): e0207, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1795073

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To determine whether placental cell therapy PLacental eXpanded (PLX)-PAD (Pluristem Therapeutics, Haifa, Israel) may be beneficial to treating critically ill patients suffering from acute respiratory distress syndrome due to coronavirus disease 2019. DESIGN: Retrospective case report of critically ill coronavirus disease 2019 patients treated with PLacental eXpanded (PLX)-PAD from March 26, 2020, to April 4, 2020, with follow-up through May 2, 2020. SETTING: Four hospitals in Israel (Rambam Health Care Campus, Bnai Zion Medical Center, and Samson Assuta Ashdod University Hospital), and Holy Name Medical Center in New Jersey. PATIENTS: Eight critically ill patients on invasive mechanical ventilation, suffering from acute respiratory distress syndrome due to coronavirus disease 2019. INTERVENTIONS: Intramuscular injection of PLacental eXpanded (PLX)-PAD (300 × 106 cells) given as one to two treatments. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Mortality, time to discharge, and changes in blood and respiratory variables were monitored during hospitalization to day 17 posttreatment. Of the eight patients treated (median age 55 yr, seven males and one female), five were discharged, two remained hospitalized, and one died. By day 3 postinjection, mean C-reactive protein fell 45% (240.3-131.3 mg/L; p = 0.0019) and fell to 77% by day 5 (56.0 mg/L; p < 0.0001). Pao2/Fio2 improved in 5:8 patients after 24-hour posttreatment, with similar effects 48-hour posttreatment. A decrease in positive end-expiratory pressure and increase in pH were statistically significant between days 0 and 14 (p = 0.0032 and p = 0.00072, respectively). A decrease in hemoglobin was statistically significant for days 0-5 and 0-14 (p = 0.015 and p = 0.0028, respectively), whereas for creatinine, it was statistically significant between days 0 and 14 (p = 0.032). CONCLUSIONS: Improvement in several variables such as C-reactive protein, positive end-expiratory pressure, and Pao2/Fio2 was observed following PLacental eXpanded (PLX)-PAD treatment, suggesting possible therapeutic effect. However, interpretation of the data is limited due to the small sample size, use of concomitant investigational therapies, and the uncontrolled study design. The efficacy of PLacental eXpanded (PLX)-PAD in coronavirus disease 2019 should be further evaluated in a controlled clinical trial.

19.
Crit Care Explor ; 2(9): e0218, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1795068

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To describe three coronavirus disease 2019 patients suffering from acute respiratory distress syndrome under venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy and tight anticoagulation monitoring presenting a novel pattern of multifocal brain hemorrhage in various degrees in all cerebral and cerebellar lobes. DESIGN: Clinical observation of three patients. Post mortem examinations. SETTING: Two ICUs at the University Hospital Erlangen. PATIENTS: Three patients (medium age 56.6 yr, two male with hypertension and diabetes, one female with no medical history) developed severe acute respiratory distress syndrome on the basis of a severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection. All required mechanical ventilation and venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support. INTERVENTIONS: Clinical observation, CT, data extraction from electronic medical records, and post mortem examinations. MAIN RESULTS: We report on an unusual multifocal bleeding pattern in the white matter in three cases with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome due to coronavirus disease 2019 undergoing venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy. Bleeding pattern with consecutive herniation was found in CT scans as well as in neuropathologic post mortem examinations. Frequency for this unusual brain hemorrhage in coronavirus disease 2019 patients with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy at our hospital is currently 50%, whereas bleeding events in extracorporeal membrane oxygenation patients generally occur at 10-15%. CONCLUSIONS: Multifocality and high frequency of the unusual white matter hemorrhage pattern suggest a coherence to coronavirus disease 2019. Neuropathological analyses showed circumscribed thrombotic cerebrovascular occlusions, which eventually led to microvascular and later on macrovascular disseminated bleeding events. However, signs of cerebrovascular inflammation could not be detected. Polymerase chain reaction analyses of brain tissue or cerebrospinal fluid remained negative. Increased susceptibility for fatal bleeding events should be taken into consideration in terms of systemic anticoagulation strategies in coronavirus disease 2019.

20.
Plast Reconstr Surg Glob Open ; 8(9): e3080, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1795020

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: It is anticipated that in due course the burden of emergency care due to COVID-19 infected patients will reduce sufficiently to permit elective surgical procedures to recommence. Prioritizing cleft/craniofacial surgery in the already overloaded medical system will then become an issue. The European Cleft Palate Craniofacial Association, together with the European Cleft and Craniofacial Initiative for Equality in Care, performed a brief survey to capture a current snapshot during a rapidly evolving pandemic. METHODS: A questionnaire was sent to the 2242 participants who attended 1 of 3 recent international cleft/craniofacial meetings. RESULTS: The respondents indicated that children with Robin sequence who were not responding to nonsurgical options should be treated as emergency cases. Over 70% of the respondents indicated that palate repair should be performed before the age of 15 months, an additional 22% stating the same be performed by 18 months. Placement of middle ear tubes, primary cleft lip surgery, alveolar bone grafting, and velopharyngeal insufficiency surgery also need prioritization. Children with craniofacial conditions such as craniosynostosis and increased intracranial pressure need immediate care, whilst children with craniosynostosis and associated obstructive sleep apnea syndrome or proptosis need surgical care within 3 months of the typical timing. Craniosynostosis without signs of increased intracranial pressure needs correction before the age of 18 months. CONCLUSIONS: This survey indicates several areas of cleft and craniofacial conditions that need prioritization, but also certain areas where intervention is less urgent. We acknowledge that there will be differences in the post COVID-19 response according to circumstances and policies in individual countries.

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