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1.
J Thromb Haemost ; 18(7): 1797, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1383425
2.
Ginekol Pol ; 92(2): 165-173, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1964413

ABSTRACT

The Polish Society of Colposcopy and Cervical Pathophysiology (PTKiPSM) together with the Polish Society of Gynecologists and Obstetricians (PTGiP) issued a final summary of interim guidelines for secondary cervical cancer prevention during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic based on the analysis of the latest directional publications and the authors' own experiences. The aim of the summary is to facilitate the implementation of the most effective possible screening of cervical precancerous lesions and cervical cancer due to temporary significant limitation of screening as a consequence of the ongoing epidemiological threat. These final guidelines are taking into account the 2020 call of the World Health Organization (WHO) for global epidemiological elimination of cervical cancer. The guidelines supplement the interim guidelines of PTKiPSM and PTGiP announced in March 2020 on the possible deferral of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in patients with abnormal screening tests results in secondary prevention of cervical cancer in current pandemic.


Subject(s)
Colposcopy , Early Detection of Cancer/methods , Mass Screening/methods , Secondary Prevention , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/diagnosis , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/prevention & control , Algorithms , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Poland , Precancerous Conditions/diagnosis , Precancerous Conditions/prevention & control , Precancerous Conditions/surgery , SARS-CoV-2 , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/surgery
4.
J Am Coll Clin Pharm ; 3(6): 1138-1146, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1898810

ABSTRACT

The recent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) challenges pharmacists worldwide. Alongside other specialized pharmacists, we re-evaluated daily processes and therapies used to treat COVID-19 patients within our institutions from a cardiovascular perspective and share what we have learned. To develop a collaborative approach for cardiology issues and concerns in the care of confirmed or suspected COVID-19 patients by drawing on the experiences of cardiology pharmacists across the country. On March 26, 2020, a conference call was convened composed of 24 cardiology residency-trained pharmacists (23 actively practicing in cardiology and 1 in critical care) from 16 institutions across the United States to discuss cardiology issues each have encountered with COVID-19 patients. Discussion centered around providing optimal pharmaceutical care while limiting staff exposure. The collaborative of pharmacists found for the ST-elevation myocardial infarction patient, many institutions were diverting COVID-19 rule-out patients to their Emergency Department (ED). Thrombolytics are an alternative to percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) allowing for timely treatment of patients and decreased staff exposure. An emergency response grab and go kit includes initial drugs and airway equipment so the patient can be treated and the cart can be left outside the room. Cardiology pharmacists have developed policies and procedures to address monitoring of QT prolonging medications, the use of inhaled prostacyclins, and national drug shortages. Technology has allowed us to practice social distancing, while staying in close contact with our teams, patients, and colleagues and continuing to teach. Residents are engaged in unique decision-making processes with their preceptors and assist as pharmacist extenders. Cardiology pharmacists are in a unique position to work with other pharmacists and health care professionals to implement safe and effective practice changes during the COVID-19 pandemic. Ongoing monitoring and adjustments are necessary in rapidly changing times.

5.
Crit Care Explor ; 2(6): e0155, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1795092

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Renal replacement therapy in coronavirus disease 2019 patients is complicated by increased activation of the coagulation system. This may worsen the quality of hemodialysis and contribute to a shortage of dialysis machines as well as plastic disposables during the pandemic. This study describes a simple and safe protocol of anticoagulation with low-molecular-weight heparin in combination with bedside sustained low-efficiency hemodialysis in coronavirus disease 2019 patients. DESIGN: Monocentric observational cross-over trial investigating sustained low-efficiency hemodialysis with unfractionated heparin following sustained low-efficiency hemodialysis with low-molecular-weight heparin. SETTING: Coronavirus disease 2019-ICU in a German Tertiary Care University Hospital. PATIENTS: Three consecutive severe coronavirus disease 2019 patients receiving nine sustained low-efficiency hemodialysis therapies with unfractionated heparin followed by 18 sustained low-efficiency hemodialysis therapies with low-molecular-weight heparin. INTERVENTIONS: Switch from IV unfractionated heparin to subcutaneous low-molecular-weight heparin enoxaparin in therapeutic doses for patients receiving bedside sustained low-efficiency hemodialysis. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Nine renal replacement therapy sessions in patients anticoagulated with high doses of unfractionated heparin had to be discontinuated prematurely because of clotting of tubes or membrane and poor quality of hemodialysis. In the same patients, the switch to anticoagulation with therapeutic doses of the low-molecular-weight heparin enoxaparin allowed undisturbed bedside sustained low-efficiency hemodialysis for at least 12 hours. Quality of hemodialysis was excellent, no bleeding event was observed. CONCLUSIONS: Systemic anticoagulation with subcutaneous enoxaparin provides an effective and safe renal replacement procedure in critically ill patients with coronavirus disease 2019 and hypercoagulability. The protocol reduces the risk of filter clotting, blood loss, and poor dialysis quality and may also prevent systemic thromboembolism.

6.
Crit Rev Microbiol ; 46(6): 689-702, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1730391

ABSTRACT

Intensive worldwide efforts are underway to determine both the pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 infection and the immune responses in COVID-19 patients in order to develop effective therapeutics and vaccines. One type of cell that may contribute to these immune responses is the γδ T lymphocyte, which plays a key role in immunosurveillance of the mucosal and epithelial barriers by rapidly responding to pathogens. Although found in low numbers in blood, γδ T cells consist the majority of tissue-resident T cells and participate in the front line of the host immune defense. Previous studies have demonstrated the critical protective role of γδ T cells in immune responses to other respiratory viruses, including SARS-CoV-1. However, no studies have profoundly investigated these cells in COVID-19 patients to date. γδ T cells can be safely expanded in vivo using existing inexpensive FDA-approved drugs such as bisphosphonate, in order to test its protective immune response to SARS-CoV-2. To support this line of research, we review insights gained from previous coronavirus research, along with recent findings, discussing the potential role of γδ T cells in controlling SARS-CoV-2. We conclude by proposing several strategies to enhance γδ T cell's antiviral function, which may be used in developing therapies for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , Animals , Betacoronavirus/genetics , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Virus Replication
7.
Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Pharmacother ; 8(2): 157-164, 2022 02 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1692232

ABSTRACT

AIM: Assessing the effect of statin therapy (ST) at hospital admission for COVID-19 on in-hospital mortality. METHODS AND RESULTS: Retrospective observational study. Patients taking statins were 11 years older and had significantly more comorbidities than patients who were not taking statins. A genetic matching (GM) procedure was performed prior to analysis of the mortality risk. A Cox proportional hazards model was used for the cause-specific hazard (CSH) function, and a competing-risks Fine and Gray (FG) model was also used to study the direct effects of statins on risk. Data from reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction-confirmed 2157 SARS-CoV-2-infected patients [1234 men, 923 women; age: 67 y/o (IQR 54-78)] admitted to the hospital were retrieved from the clinical records in anonymized manner. Three hundred and fifty-three deaths occurred. Five hundred and eighty-one patients were taking statins. Univariate test after GM showed a significantly lower mortality rate in patients on ST than the matched non-statin group (19.8% vs. 25.4%, χ2 with Yates continuity correction: P = 0.027). The mortality rate was even lower in patients (n = 336) who maintained their statin treatments during hospitalization compared with the GM non-statin group (17.4%; P = 0.045). The Cox model applied to the CSH function [HR = 0.58(CI: 0.39-0.89); P = 0.01] and the competing-risks FG model [HR = 0.60 (CI: 0.39-0.92); P = 0.02] suggest that statins are associated with reduced COVID-19-related mortality. CONCLUSIONS: A lower SARS-CoV-2 infection-related mortality was observed in patients treated with ST prior to hospitalization. Statin therapy should not be discontinued due to the global concern of the pandemic or in patients hospitalized for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors , Aged , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Lancet ; 397(10289): 2049-2059, 2021 May 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1671320

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Many patients with COVID-19 have been treated with plasma containing anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies. We aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of convalescent plasma therapy in patients admitted to hospital with COVID-19. METHODS: This randomised, controlled, open-label, platform trial (Randomised Evaluation of COVID-19 Therapy [RECOVERY]) is assessing several possible treatments in patients hospitalised with COVID-19 in the UK. The trial is underway at 177 NHS hospitals from across the UK. Eligible and consenting patients were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive either usual care alone (usual care group) or usual care plus high-titre convalescent plasma (convalescent plasma group). The primary outcome was 28-day mortality, analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. The trial is registered with ISRCTN, 50189673, and ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04381936. FINDINGS: Between May 28, 2020, and Jan 15, 2021, 11558 (71%) of 16287 patients enrolled in RECOVERY were eligible to receive convalescent plasma and were assigned to either the convalescent plasma group or the usual care group. There was no significant difference in 28-day mortality between the two groups: 1399 (24%) of 5795 patients in the convalescent plasma group and 1408 (24%) of 5763 patients in the usual care group died within 28 days (rate ratio 1·00, 95% CI 0·93-1·07; p=0·95). The 28-day mortality rate ratio was similar in all prespecified subgroups of patients, including in those patients without detectable SARS-CoV-2 antibodies at randomisation. Allocation to convalescent plasma had no significant effect on the proportion of patients discharged from hospital within 28 days (3832 [66%] patients in the convalescent plasma group vs 3822 [66%] patients in the usual care group; rate ratio 0·99, 95% CI 0·94-1·03; p=0·57). Among those not on invasive mechanical ventilation at randomisation, there was no significant difference in the proportion of patients meeting the composite endpoint of progression to invasive mechanical ventilation or death (1568 [29%] of 5493 patients in the convalescent plasma group vs 1568 [29%] of 5448 patients in the usual care group; rate ratio 0·99, 95% CI 0·93-1·05; p=0·79). INTERPRETATION: In patients hospitalised with COVID-19, high-titre convalescent plasma did not improve survival or other prespecified clinical outcomes. FUNDING: UK Research and Innovation (Medical Research Council) and National Institute of Health Research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Hospital Mortality , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Humans , Immunization, Passive/methods , Immunization, Passive/mortality , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome , United Kingdom/epidemiology
9.
Lancet ; 397(10285): 1637-1645, 2021 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1655260

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of tocilizumab in adult patients admitted to hospital with COVID-19 with both hypoxia and systemic inflammation. METHODS: This randomised, controlled, open-label, platform trial (Randomised Evaluation of COVID-19 Therapy [RECOVERY]), is assessing several possible treatments in patients hospitalised with COVID-19 in the UK. Those trial participants with hypoxia (oxygen saturation <92% on air or requiring oxygen therapy) and evidence of systemic inflammation (C-reactive protein ≥75 mg/L) were eligible for random assignment in a 1:1 ratio to usual standard of care alone versus usual standard of care plus tocilizumab at a dose of 400 mg-800 mg (depending on weight) given intravenously. A second dose could be given 12-24 h later if the patient's condition had not improved. The primary outcome was 28-day mortality, assessed in the intention-to-treat population. The trial is registered with ISRCTN (50189673) and ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT04381936). FINDINGS: Between April 23, 2020, and Jan 24, 2021, 4116 adults of 21 550 patients enrolled into the RECOVERY trial were included in the assessment of tocilizumab, including 3385 (82%) patients receiving systemic corticosteroids. Overall, 621 (31%) of the 2022 patients allocated tocilizumab and 729 (35%) of the 2094 patients allocated to usual care died within 28 days (rate ratio 0·85; 95% CI 0·76-0·94; p=0·0028). Consistent results were seen in all prespecified subgroups of patients, including those receiving systemic corticosteroids. Patients allocated to tocilizumab were more likely to be discharged from hospital within 28 days (57% vs 50%; rate ratio 1·22; 1·12-1·33; p<0·0001). Among those not receiving invasive mechanical ventilation at baseline, patients allocated tocilizumab were less likely to reach the composite endpoint of invasive mechanical ventilation or death (35% vs 42%; risk ratio 0·84; 95% CI 0·77-0·92; p<0·0001). INTERPRETATION: In hospitalised COVID-19 patients with hypoxia and systemic inflammation, tocilizumab improved survival and other clinical outcomes. These benefits were seen regardless of the amount of respiratory support and were additional to the benefits of systemic corticosteroids. FUNDING: UK Research and Innovation (Medical Research Council) and National Institute of Health Research.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/therapy , Hypoxia/therapy , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/adverse effects , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Hypoxia/diagnosis , Hypoxia/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
10.
Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 44(8): 587-598, 2021 Oct.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1626213

ABSTRACT

Patients with certain immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), have an increased risk of severe infectious diseases than the general population, which are mainly associated with the immunosuppressive treatments that they receive. These treatments act on the immune system through different mechanisms, causing different degrees of immunosuppression and a variable risk depending on whether the pathogen is a virus, bacteria or fungus. This article reviews the most relevant literature on the subject, which was selected and discussed by a panel of experts. The aim of this article is to review the risk of infections in patients with IBD and RA, and the potential preventive measures.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Rheumatoid/therapy , Bacterial Infections/prevention & control , Biological Therapy/adverse effects , Immunosuppressive Agents/adverse effects , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/therapy , Janus Kinase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Virus Diseases/prevention & control , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/immunology , COVID-19/etiology , Hepatitis A/prevention & control , Hepatitis B/prevention & control , Herpes Zoster/prevention & control , Humans , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/immunology , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Pneumococcal Infections/prevention & control , Risk Factors , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/prevention & control , Vaccination Coverage , Vaccines, Inactivated/administration & dosage
11.
Eur J Neurol ; 28(10): 3384-3395, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1608838

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Information regarding multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is scarce. The study objective was to describe the incidence and characteristics of MS patients with COVID-19, to identify susceptibility and severity risk factors and to assess the proportion of positive severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) serologies according to disease-modifying treatments. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of an MS cohort analysing data collected between February and May 2020. Cases were identified through an email survey and clinical visits. The relationship of demographic and MS characteristics with COVID-19 and of the disease-modifying treatments with SARS-CoV-2 serostatus were examined. RESULTS: Data from 48 suspected cases out of 758 valid respondents and from 45 COVID-19 cases identified through clinical visits were collected. Incidence was 6.3%. Nineteen (20.3%) patients were hospitalized and two (2.2%) died. Multivariable models determined that age (odds ratio [OR] per 10 years 0.53, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.34-0.85), contact with a confirmed case (OR 197.02, 95% CI 56.36-688.79), residence in Barcelona (OR 2.23, 95% CI 1.03-4.80), MS duration (OR per 5 years 1.41, 95% CI 1.09-1.83) and time on anti-CD20 treatment (OR per 2 years 3.48, 95% CI 1.44-8.45) were independent factors for presenting COVID-19 and age (OR per 10 years 2.71, 95% CI 1.13-6.53) for a severe COVID-19. Out of the 79 (84.9%) with serological test, 45.6% generated antibodies, but only 17.6% of those on anti-CD20 therapies. Lymphopaenia or immunoglobulin levels did not relate to COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Multiple sclerosis patients present similar incidence, risk factors and outcomes for COVID-19 as the general population. Patients treated with an anti-CD20 therapy for a longer period of time might be at a higher risk of COVID-19 and less than 20% generate an antibody response. Only age was related to severity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Multiple Sclerosis , Child , Humans , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
12.
J Immunotoxicol ; 18(1): 23-29, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593522

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 of 2019 (COVID-19) causes a pandemic that has been diagnosed in more than 70 million people worldwide. Mild-to-moderate COVID-19 symptoms include coughing, fever, myalgia, shortness of breath, and acute inflammatory lung injury (ALI). In contrast, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and respiratory failure occur in patients diagnosed with severe COVID-19. ARDS is mediated, at least in part, by a dysregulated inflammatory response due to excessive levels of circulating cytokines, a condition known as the "cytokine-storm syndrome." Currently, there are FDA-approved therapies that attenuate the dysregulated inflammation that occurs in COVID-19 patients, such as dexamethasone or other corticosteroids and IL-6 inhibitors, including sarilumab, tocilizumab, and siltuximab. However, the efficacy of these treatments have been shown to be inconsistent. Compounds that activate the vagus nerve-mediated cholinergic anti-inflammatory reflex, such as the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist, GTS-21, attenuate ARDS/inflammatory lung injury by decreasing the extracellular levels of high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) in the airways and the circulation. It is possible that HMGB1 may be an important mediator of the "cytokine-storm syndrome." Notably, high plasma levels of HMGB1 have been reported in patients diagnosed with severe COVID-19, and there is a significant negative correlation between HMGB1 plasma levels and clinical outcomes. Nicotine can activate the cholinergic anti-inflammatory reflex, which attenuates the up-regulation and the excessive release of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines. Therefore, we hypothesize that low molecular weight compounds that activate the cholinergic anti-inflammatory reflex, such as nicotine or GTS-21, may represent a potential therapeutic approach to attenuate the dysregulated inflammatory responses in patients with severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Benzylidene Compounds/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cholinergic Agents/pharmacology , Inflammation/drug therapy , Nicotine/metabolism , Pyridines/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Tobacco Use Disorder/drug therapy , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Cigarette Smoking/adverse effects , Dexamethasone/therapeutic use , HMGB1 Protein/blood , Humans , Pandemics , alpha7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor/agonists
13.
Rev Med Virol ; 31(5): 1-13, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574052

ABSTRACT

Anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) biologicals, Dexamethasone and rIL-7 are of considerable interest in treating COVID-19 patients who are in danger of, or have become, seriously ill. Yet reducing sepsis mortality by lowering circulating levels of TNF lost favour when positive endpoints in earlier simplistic models could not be reproduced in well-conducted human trials. Newer information with anti-TNF biologicals has encouraged reintroducing this concept for treating COVID-19. Viral models have had encouraging outcomes, as have the effects of anti-TNF biologicals on community-acquired COVID-19 during their long-term use to treat chronic inflammatory states. The positive outcome of a large scale trial of dexamethasone, and its higher potency late in the disease, harmonises well with its capacity to enhance levels of IL-7Rα, the receptor for IL-7, a cytokine that enhances lymphocyte development and is increased during the cytokine storm. Lymphoid germinal centres required for antibody-based immunity can be harmed by TNF, and restored by reducing TNF. Thus the IL-7- enhancing activity of dexamethasone may explain its higher potency when lymphocytes are depleted later in the infection, while employing anti-TNF, for several reasons, is much more logical earlier in the infection. This implies dexamethasone could prove to be synergistic with rIL-7, currently being trialed as a COVID-19 therapeutic. The principles behind these COVID-19 therapies are consistent with the observed chronic hypoxia through reduced mitochondrial function, and also the increased severity of this disease in ApoE4-positive individuals. Many of the debilitating persistent aspects of this disease are predictably susceptible to treatment with perispinal etanercept, since they have cerebral origins.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Dexamethasone/administration & dosage , Interleukin-17/administration & dosage , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/antagonists & inhibitors , Animals , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/genetics , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Humans , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/genetics , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/immunology
14.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(11): 2073-2082, 2021 12 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1560084

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic poses an urgent need for the development of effective therapies for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: We first tested SARS-CoV-2-specific T-cell (CοV-2-ST) immunity and expansion in unexposed donors, COVID-19-infected individuals (convalescent), asymptomatic polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-positive subjects, vaccinated individuals, non-intensive care unit (ICU) hospitalized patients, and ICU patients who either recovered and were discharged (ICU recovered) or had a prolonged stay and/or died (ICU critical). CoV-2-STs were generated from all types of donors and underwent phenotypic and functional assessment. RESULTS: We demonstrate causal relationship between the expansion of endogenous CoV-2-STs and the disease outcome; insufficient expansion of circulating CoV-2-STs identified hospitalized patients at high risk for an adverse outcome. CoV-2-STs with a similarly functional and non-alloreactive, albeit highly cytotoxic, profile against SARS-CoV-2 could be expanded from both convalescent and vaccinated donors generating clinical-scale, SARS-CoV-2-specific T-cell products with functional activity against both the unmutated virus and its B.1.1.7 and B.1.351 variants. In contrast, critical COVID-19 patient-originating CoV-2-STs failed to expand, recapitulating the in vivo failure of CoV-2-specific T-cell immunity to control the infection. CoV-2-STs generated from asymptomatic PCR-positive individuals presented only weak responses, whereas their counterparts originating from exposed to other seasonal coronaviruses subjects failed to kill the virus, thus disempowering the hypothesis of protective cross-immunity. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, we provide evidence on risk stratification of hospitalized COVID-19 patients and the feasibility of generating powerful CoV-2-ST products from both convalescent and vaccinated donors as an "off-the shelf" T-cell immunotherapy for high-risk patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , Immunotherapy, Adoptive , T-Lymphocytes
15.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(11): e4082-e4089, 2021 12 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1559187

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Leronlimab, a monoclonal antibody blocker of C-C chemokine receptor type 5 originally developed to treat human immunodeficiency virus infection, was administered as an open-label compassionate-use therapeutic for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: Twenty-three hospitalized severe/critical COVID-19 patients received 700 mg leronlimab subcutaneously, repeated after 7 days in 17 of 23 patients still hospitalized. Eighteen of 23 received other experimental treatments, including convalescent plasma, hydroxychloroquine, steroids, and/or tocilizumab. Five of 23 received leronlimab after blinded, placebo-controlled trials of remdesivir, sarilumab, selinexor, or tocilizumab. Outcomes and results were extracted from medical records. RESULTS: Mean age was 69.5 ±â€…14.9 years; 20 had significant comorbidities. At baseline, 22 were receiving supplemental oxygen (3 high flow, 7 mechanical ventilation). Blood showed markedly elevated inflammatory markers (ferritin, D-dimer, C-reactive protein) and an elevated neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio. By day 30 after initial dosing, 17 were recovered, 2 were still hospitalized, and 4 had died. Of the 7 intubated at baseline, 4 were fully recovered off oxygen, 2 were still hospitalized, and 1 had died. CONCLUSIONS: Leronlimab appeared safe and well tolerated. The high recovery rate suggested benefit, and those with lower inflammatory markers had better outcomes. Some, but not all, patients appeared to have dramatic clinical responses, indicating that unknown factors may determine responsiveness to leronlimab. Routine inflammatory and cell prognostic markers did not markedly change immediately after treatment, although interleukin-6 tended to fall. In some persons, C-reactive protein clearly dropped only after the second leronlimab dose, suggesting that a higher loading dose might be more effective. Future controlled trials will be informative.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized , COVID-19/therapy , HIV Antibodies , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
16.
Mediterr J Rheumatol ; 31(Suppl 2): 253-256, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1554048

ABSTRACT

The global coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) situation threatens not only the health of populations, but also the coherence and function of health care systems. Patients with systemic inflammatory disorders feel the overwhelming strain of COVID-19, since their disease, administered treatments, and associated comorbidities may all contribute to increased vulnerability to infection. At the same time, monitoring the activity status of rheumatic diseases and adjusting the treatments where appropriate, are important for preventing flares and other complications, which could pose additional health risks. Considering the urgent need to maintain physical distancing and self-quarantine as much as possible, we herein discuss the challenges and possible solutions pertaining to the assessment and monitoring of patients with systemic inflammatory diseases. We also discuss issues related to the prescription and supply of anti-rheumatic drugs, as well as opportunities provided by the use of technological and wireless tools. From an optimistic viewpoint, the end of this pandemic may leave us with an important legacy in utilising and implementing e-health solutions that may both improve the clinical care standards for patients with systemic inflammatory diseases and also reduce the burden placed on healthcare systems.

17.
Mediterr J Rheumatol ; 31(Suppl 2): 295-297, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1539055

ABSTRACT

Patients with various inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, skin, liver, kidneys, and musculoskeletal system-connective tissues, often undergo different anti-inflammatory therapies to maintain remission and avoid serious and/or life-threatening complications. Available data so far show an increased rate of hospitalization in such patients during the COVID19 pandemic. The key points of our position statement are summarized below: Patients with inflammatory diseases who receive moderate or high-risk anti-inflammatory therapies might be considered as an increased risk group for severe COVID-19 and appropriate measures should be taken in order to protect them. Initiation of immuno-suppressive/modulatory therapies should be done with caution, taking into account the severity of the underlying inflammatory disease, the type of anti-inflammatory treatment, and the risk of exposure to the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Discontinuation of anti-inflammatory therapies in patients who have not been exposed to or infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus is not recommended. In patients who become infected with SARS-CoV-2, anti-inflammatory therapies should be discontinued, except in special cases. Specialty physicians should actively participate in the Interdisciplinary Teams caring for patients with inflammatory diseases during COVID19 infection.

18.
Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol ; 9(5): 293-303, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1531930

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In patients with type 2 diabetes, hyperglycaemia is an independent risk factor for COVID-19-related mortality. Associations between pre-infection prescription for glucose-lowering drugs and COVID-19-related mortality in people with type 2 diabetes have been postulated but only investigated in small studies and limited to a few agents. We investigated whether there are associations between prescription of different classes of glucose-lowering drugs and risk of COVID-19-related mortality in people with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: This was a nationwide observational cohort study done with data from the National Diabetes Audit for people with type 2 diabetes and registered with a general practice in England since 2003. Cox regression was used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) of COVID-19-related mortality in people prescribed each class of glucose-lowering drug, with covariate adjustment with a propensity score to address confounding by demographic, socioeconomic, and clinical factors. FINDINGS: Among the 2 851 465 people with type 2 diabetes included in our analyses, 13 479 (0·5%) COVID-19-related deaths occurred during the study period (Feb 16 to Aug 31, 2020), corresponding to a rate of 8·9 per 1000 person-years (95% CI 8·7-9·0). The adjusted HR associated with recorded versus no recorded prescription was 0·77 (95% CI 0·73-0·81) for metformin and 1·42 (1·35-1·49) for insulin. Adjusted HRs for prescription of other individual classes of glucose-lowering treatment were as follows: 0·75 (0·48-1·17) for meglitinides, 0·82 (0·74-0·91) for SGLT2 inhibitors, 0·94 (0·82-1·07) for thiazolidinediones, 0·94 (0·89-0·99) for sulfonylureas, 0·94 (0·83-1·07) for GLP-1 receptor agonists, 1·07 (1·01-1·13) for DPP-4 inhibitors, and 1·26 (0·76-2·09) for α-glucosidase inhibitors. INTERPRETATION: Our results provide evidence of associations between prescription of some glucose-lowering drugs and COVID-19-related mortality, although the differences in risk are small and these findings are likely to be due to confounding by indication, in view of the use of different drug classes at different stages of type 2 diabetes disease progression. In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, there is no clear indication to change prescribing of glucose-lowering drugs in people with type 2 diabetes. FUNDING: None.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/drug therapy , Hypoglycemic Agents/adverse effects , Aged , COVID-19/complications , Cohort Studies , England , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Proportional Hazards Models
19.
Front Neurol ; 12: 676095, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526775

ABSTRACT

Treatment of pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (POMS) has been tailored after observational studies and data obtained from clinical trials in adult-onset multiple sclerosis (AOMS) patients. There are an increasing number of new therapeutic agents for AOMS, and many will be formally studied for use also in POMS. However, there are important efficacy and safety concerns regarding the use of these therapies in children and young adults. This review will discuss the current state of the art of POMS therapy and will focus on the newer therapies (oral and infusion disease-modifying drugs) and on those still currently under investigation.

20.
J Clin Med ; 10(8)2021 Apr 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526820

ABSTRACT

In the context of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, we aimed to evaluate the impact of anti-cytokine therapies (AT) in kidney transplant recipients requiring hospitalization due to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. This is an observational retrospective study, which included patients from March to May 2020. An inverse probability of treatment weighting from a propensity score to receive AT was used in all statistical analyses, and we applied a bootstrap procedure in order to calculate an estimation of the 2.5th and 97.5th percentiles of odds ratio (OR). outcomes were measured using an ordinal scale determination (OSD). A total of 33 kidney recipients required hospitalization and 54% of them received at least one AT, mainly tocilizumab (42%), followed by anakinra (12%). There was no statistical effect in terms of intensive care unit (ICU) admission, respiratory secondary infections (35% vs. 7%) or mortality (16% vs. 13%) comparing patients that received AT with those who did not. Nevertheless, patients who received AT presented better outcomes during hospitalization in terms of OSD ≥5 ((OR 0.31; 2.5th, 97.5th percentiles (0.10; 0.72)). These analyses indicate, as a plausible hypothesis, that the use of AT in kidney transplant recipients presenting with COVID-19 could be beneficial, even though multicenter randomized control trials using these therapies in transplanted patients are needed.

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