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1.
Mayo Clin Proc Innov Qual Outcomes ; 2021 Apr 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1804780

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To conduct a comprehensive evaluation of coagulation profiles - via traditional and whole blood thromboelastometry tests - in COVID-19 positive vs. COVID-19 negative patients admitted to medical wards for acute pneumonia. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We enrolled all consecutive patients admitted to Internal Medicine wards of Padova University Hospital between 7 March and 30 April 2020 for COVID-19-related pneumonia (cases) vs. non-COVID-19 pneumonia (controls). A group of healthy subjects acted as baseline for thromboelastometry parameters. RESULTS: Fifty-six cases (mean age 64±15 yrs, M/F 37/19) and 56 controls (mean age 76±11 yrs, M/F 35/21) were enrolled. Cases and controls showed markedly hypercoagulable thromboelastometry profiles vs. healthy subjects, mainly characterized by a significantly shorter propagation phase of coagulation (Clot Formation Time, CFT) and significantly increased maximum clot firmness (MCF) (p <0.001 in all comparisons). COVID-19 patients with pneumonia had significantly shorter CFT and higher MCF (p <0.01 and <0.05, respectively in all comparisons) vs. controls. CONCLUSION: Patients admitted to internal medicine wards for COVID-19 pneumonia presented a markedly prothrombotic state, which seems peculiar to COVID-19 rather than pneumonia itself.

2.
Ann Med ; 53(1): 295-301, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575822

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Critically ill patients with COVID-19 are at increased risk of developing a hypercoagulable state due to haemostatic changes directly related to the SARS-CoV-2 infection or to the consequence of the cytokine storm. Anticoagulation is now recommended to reduce the thrombotic risk. Ilio-psoas haematoma (IPH) is a potentially lethal condition that can arise during the hospitalization, especially in intensive care units (ICUs) and frequently reported as a complication of anticoagulation treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We report a case series of seven subjects with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia complicated by Ilio-psoas haematomas (IPHs) at our COVID-Hospital in Rome, Italy. RESULTS: Over the observation period, 925 subjects with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection were admitted to our COVID-hospital. Among them, we found seven spontaneous IPHs with an incidence of 7.6 cases per 1000 hospitalization. All the reported cases had a severe manifestation of COVID-19 pneumonia, with at least one comorbidity and 5/7 were on treatment with low weight molecular heparin for micro or macro pulmonary thrombosis. CONCLUSIONS: Given the indications to prescribe anticoagulant therapy in COVID-19 and the lack of solid evidences on the optimal dose and duration, it is important to be aware of the iliopsoas haematoma as a potentially serious complication in COVID-19 inpatients. KEY MESSAGE Critically ill patients with COVID-19 are at increased risk of hypercoagulability state and anticoagulation therapy is recommended. Ilio-psoas haematoma (IPH) is found to be a complication of anticoagulation regimen especially in severe COVID-19 cases. An incidence of 7.6 cases per 1000 admission of IPHs was reported. Hypoesthesia of the lower limbs, pain triggered by femoral rotation, hypovolaemia and anaemia are the most common symptoms and signs of IPHs that should alert physician.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/adverse effects , COVID-19/complications , Hematoma/epidemiology , Psoas Muscles/diagnostic imaging , Thrombophilia/drug therapy , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Critical Illness/mortality , Critical Illness/therapy , Female , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Hematoma/chemically induced , Hematoma/diagnosis , Hematoma/drug therapy , Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Incidence , Intensive Care Units , Italy/epidemiology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Muscular Diseases , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index , Thrombophilia/etiology , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Treatment Outcome
3.
Front Cardiovasc Med ; 7: 598400, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485042

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus pandemic has reportedly infected over 31.5 million individuals and caused over 970,000 deaths worldwide (as of 22nd Sept 2020). This novel coronavirus, officially named severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), although primarily causes significant respiratory distress, can have significant deleterious effects on the cardiovascular system. Severe cases of the virus frequently result in respiratory distress requiring mechanical ventilation, often seen, but not confined to, individuals with pre-existing hypertension and cardiovascular disease, potentially due to the fact that the virus can enter the circulation via the lung alveoli. Here the virus can directly infect vascular tissues, via TMPRSS2 spike glycoprotein priming, thereby facilitating ACE-2-mediated viral entry. Clinical manifestations, such as vasculitis, have been detected in a number of vascular beds (e.g., lungs, heart, and kidneys), with thromboembolism being observed in patients suffering from severe coronavirus disease (COVID-19), suggesting the virus perturbs the vasculature, leading to vascular dysfunction. Activation of endothelial cells via the immune-mediated inflammatory response and viral infection of either endothelial cells or cells involved in endothelial homeostasis, are some of the multifaceted mechanisms potentially involved in the pathogenesis of vascular dysfunction within COVID-19 patients. In this review, we examine the evidence of vascular manifestations of SARS-CoV-2, the potential mechanism(s) of entry into vascular tissue and the contribution of endothelial cell dysfunction and cellular crosstalk in this vascular tropism of SARS-CoV-2. Moreover, we discuss the current evidence on hypercoagulability and how it relates to increased microvascular thromboembolic complications in COVID-19.

4.
Hemasphere ; 4(4): e457, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388044

ABSTRACT

Recent evidence is focusing on the presence of a hypercoagulable state with development of both venous and arterial thromboembolic complications in patients infected with SARS-CoV-2. The ongoing activation of coagulation related to the severity of the illness is further characterized by thrombotic microangiopathy and endotheliitis. These microangiopathic changes cannot be classified as classical disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). In this short review we describe the interaction between coagulation and inflammation with focus on the possible mechanisms that might be involved in SARS-CoV-2 infection associated coagulopathy in the critically ill.

5.
Int J Mol Sci ; 21(21)2020 Nov 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1344351

ABSTRACT

Progressive respiratory failure is seen as a major cause of death in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-Cov-2)-induced infection. Relatively little is known about the associated morphologic and molecular changes in the circulation of these patients. In particular, platelet and erythrocyte pathology might result in severe vascular issues, and the manifestations may include thrombotic complications. These thrombotic pathologies may be both extrapulmonary and intrapulmonary and may be central to respiratory failure. Previously, we reported the presence of amyloid microclots in the circulation of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Here, we investigate the presence of related circulating biomarkers, including C-reactive protein (CRP), serum ferritin, and P-selectin. These biomarkers are well-known to interact with, and cause pathology to, platelets and erythrocytes. We also study the structure of platelets and erythrocytes using fluorescence microscopy (using the markers PAC-1 and CD62PE) and scanning electron microscopy. Thromboelastography and viscometry were also used to study coagulation parameters and plasma viscosity. We conclude that structural pathologies found in platelets and erythrocytes, together with spontaneously formed amyloid microclots, may be central to vascular changes observed during COVID-19 progression, including thrombotic microangiopathy, diffuse intravascular coagulation, and large-vessel thrombosis, as well as ground-glass opacities in the lungs. Consequently, this clinical snapshot of COVID-19 strongly suggests that it is also a true vascular disease and considering it as such should form an essential part of a clinical treatment regime.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelets/pathology , Cardiovascular Diseases/virology , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Erythrocytes/pathology , Ferritins/blood , P-Selectin/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Blood Coagulation/physiology , Blood Platelets/virology , COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases/blood , Cardiovascular Diseases/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Erythrocytes/virology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombosis/pathology , Thrombosis/virology
6.
Blood Res ; 56(2): 61-64, 2021 Jun 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1335331

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has emerged as a major threat to all healthcare systems across the globe, and it was declared a public health emergency of international concern by the World Health Organization (WHO). The novel coronavirus affects the respiratory system, producing symptoms such as fever, cough, dyspnea, and pneumonia. The association between COVID-19 and coagulation has been previously reported. Due to several inflammatory changes that occur in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infections such as alterations in the levels of clotting factors, platelet activation leads to thrombus formation in coronary and cerebral vessels, leading to myocardial infarction and cerebrovascular accidents, respectively. Unfortunately, the progression of hypercoagulability in COVID-19 is rapid in patients with and without comorbidities. Hence, the proper monitoring of thrombotic complications in patients with COVID-19 is essential to avoid further complications. The implementation of guidelines for antithrombotic treatments based on the presentation of the disease is recommended. This review discusses the symptoms and mechanisms of upregulated coagulation in patients with COVID-19.

7.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 15(3): 1039-1045, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1303499

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Initially, novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) was considered primarily a respiratory pathogen. However, with time it has behaved as a virus with the potential to cause multi-system involvement, including neurological manifestations. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVT) has increasingly been reported in association with coronavirus infectious disease of 2019 (COVID-19). Here, we have shed light upon CVT and its possible mechanisms in the backdrop of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: In this review, data were collected from PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science, until March 30, 2021, using pre-specified searching strategies. The search strategy consisted of a variation of keywords of relevant medical subject headings and keywords, including "COVID-19", "SARS-CoV-2", "coronavirus", and "cerebral venous sinus thrombosis". RESULTS: COVID-19 has a causal association with a plethora of neurological, neuropsychiatric and psychological effects. CVT has gained particular importance in this regard. The known hypercoagulable state in SARS-CoV-2 infection is thought to be the main mechanism in COVID-19 related CVT. Other plausible mechanisms may include vascular endothelial dysfunction and altered flow dynamics. CONCLUSIONS: Although there are no specific clinical characteristics, insidious or acute onset headache, seizures, stroke-like, or encephalopathy symptoms in a patient with, or who has suffered COVID-19, should prompt the attending physician to investigate for CVT. The treatment of COVID-19 associated CVT does not differ radically from the therapy of CVT without the infection, i.e. urgent initiation of parenteral unfractionated heparin or low molecular weight heparin followed by conventional or mostly newer oral anticoagulants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Intracranial Thrombosis/etiology , Intracranial Thrombosis/therapy , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergency Medical Services/methods , Heparin/therapeutic use , Humans , Intracranial Thrombosis/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
8.
Thromb Res ; 204: 40-51, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275736

ABSTRACT

Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is characterized clinically by thrombocytopenia, hypercoagulability, and increased thrombosis risk, and serologically by platelet-activating anti-platelet factor 4 (PF4)/heparin antibodies. Heparin-"induced" acknowledges that HIT is usually triggered by a proximate immunizing exposure to heparin. However, certain non-heparin medications (pentosan polysulfate, hypersulfated chondroitin sulfate, fondaparinux) can trigger "HIT". Further, naturally-occurring polyanions (bacterial lipopolysaccharide, DNA/RNA) can interact with PF4 to recapitulate HIT antigens. Indeed, immunologic presensitization to naturally-occurring polyanions could explain why HIT more closely resembles a secondary, rather than a primary, immune response. In 2008 it was first reported that a HIT-mimicking disorder can occur without any preceding exposure to heparin or polyanionic medications. Termed "spontaneous HIT syndrome", two subtypes are recognized: (a) surgical (post-orthopedic, especially post-total knee arthroplasty, and (b) medical (usually post-infectious). Recently, COVID-19 adenoviral vector vaccination has been associated with a thrombotic thrombocytopenic disorder associated with positive PF4-dependent enzyme-immunoassays and serum-induced platelet activation that is maximal when PF4 is added. Vaccine-induced immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia (VITT) features unusual thromboses (cerebral venous thrombosis, splanchnic vein thrombosis) similar to those seen in spontaneous HIT syndrome. The emerging concept is that classic HIT reflects platelet-activating anti-PF4/heparin antibodies whereas spontaneous HIT syndrome and other atypical "autoimmune HIT" presentations (delayed-onset HIT, persisting HIT, heparin "flush" HIT) reflect heparin-independent platelet-activating anti-PF4 antibodies-although the precise relationships between PF4 epitope targets and the clinical syndromes remain to be determined. Treatment of spontaneous HIT syndrome includes non-heparin anticoagulation (direct oral Xa inhibitors favored over direct thrombin inhibitors) and high-dose immunoglobulin.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee , COVID-19 , Thrombocytopenia , Thrombosis , Vaccines , Anticoagulants , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/adverse effects , Heparin/adverse effects , Humans , Platelet Factor 4 , SARS-CoV-2 , Syndrome , Thrombocytopenia/chemically induced
9.
Ann Pharmacother ; 56(3): 319-329, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1273209

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the literature on a potential dexamethasone-direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC) drug interaction and provide management considerations with COVID hypercoagulability. DATA SOURCES: A search of EMBASE, PubMed, and Google Scholar (January 1990 to May 2021), limited to the English language, using applicable search terms resulted in 137 articles, with 21 relevant articles included. Regulatory agency and clinical guidance documents were also reviewed. STUDY SELECTION AND DATA EXTRACTION: Included articles describe in vitro or in vivo animal or human data for dexamethasone induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 or P-glycoprotein (P-gp). DATA SYNTHESIS: Dexamethasone has the potential to interact with the DOACs via CYP3A4 and/or P-gp induction. Only apixaban and rivaroxaban have CYP3A4 metabolism. Dexamethasone can increase CYP3A4 activity by up to 70% and reduce the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) of CYP3A4 substrates by >40%, which is consistent with criteria for a weak CYP inducer. In rodents, dexamethasone P-gp induction is associated with AUC reductions of 20% to 50%. Human data are lacking. RELEVANCE TO PATIENT CARE AND CLINICAL PRACTICE: Severe COVID-19 infection is associated with hypercoagulability. Although heparins are the preferred anticoagulants for hospitalized COVID-19 patients, DOACs are being utilized. Dexamethasone is recommended for hospitalized COVID-19 patients requiring supplemental oxygen. The concurrent use of dexamethasone and apixaban or rivaroxaban in such patients carries the potential for reduced anticoagulant effect during a state of heightened thrombotic risk. CONCLUSIONS: Concurrent use of dexamethasone and apixaban or rivaroxaban in hospitalized COVID-19 patients with laboratory evidence of COVID coagulopathy should be avoided until higher-quality data are available.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Administration, Oral , Animals , Anticoagulants/adverse effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , Dabigatran , Dexamethasone , Drug Interactions , Humans , Pyridones , Rivaroxaban , SARS-CoV-2
10.
JCO Oncol Pract ; 17(9): 522-523, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270944
11.
Br J Haematol ; 195(1): 85-89, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270821

ABSTRACT

The impact of COVID-19 infection on pregnant women remains relatively unknown but the physiological changes of pregnancy and hypercoagulability of COVID-19 may further increase thrombotic risk. In this retrospective multicentre observational study, we report clinical characteristics and outcomes in 36 pregnant women requiring hospitalisation for COVID-19 compared to a propensity-matched cohort of non-pregnant women. Pregnant women had a lower haemoglobin and higher lymphocyte counts but no differences in other haematological or biochemical parameters on admission compared to non-pregnant women. There was no significant difference in the duration of hospitalisation; median two days (1-77) for pregnant versus eight days (1-49) for non-pregnant women. A higher proportion of non-pregnant women required mechanical ventilation [11/36 (31%) vs 3/36 (8%), P = 0·03] and received thromboprophylaxis with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) within 24 h of admission [25/36 (69%) vs 15 /36(42%), P = 0·03] compared to pregnant women. One pregnant woman required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The rate of thrombosis was similar in both groups (one in each group). No women developed major bleeding or died. Data suggest that although non-pregnant women had a severe clinical course, overall outcomes were not different between women with or without pregnancy. The use of thromboprophylaxis was inconsistent, demonstrating a need for establishing evidence-based guidance for COVID-19 during pregnancy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Thrombosis/drug therapy , Adult , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Middle Aged , Pregnancy , Pregnant Women , Retrospective Studies , United Kingdom , Young Adult
12.
Virchows Arch ; 478(1): 137-150, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263146

ABSTRACT

The lung is the main affected organ in severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, and lung damage is the leading cause of death in the vast majority of patients. Mainly based on results obtained by autopsies, the seminal features of fatal COVID-19 have been described by many groups worldwide. Early changes encompass edema, epithelial damage, and capillaritis/endothelialitis, frequently combined with microthrombosis. Subsequently, patients with manifest respiratory insufficiency exhibit exudative diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) with hyaline membrane formation and pneumocyte type 2 hyperplasia, variably complicated by superinfection, which may progress to organizing/fibrotic stage DAD. These features, however, are not specific for COVID-19 and can be found in other disorders including viral infections. Clinically, the early disease stage of severe COVID-19 is characterized by high viral load, lymphopenia, massive secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and hypercoagulability, documented by elevated D-dimers and an increased frequency of thrombotic and thromboembolic events, whereas virus loads and cytokine levels tend to decrease in late disease stages, when tissue repair including angiogenesis prevails. The present review describes the spectrum of lung pathology based on the current literature and the authors' personal experience derived from clinical autopsies, and tries to summarize our current understanding and open questions of the pathophysiology of severe pulmonary COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Lung/pathology , Thrombosis/pathology , Autopsy , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Lung/virology , Thrombosis/virology
13.
Thromb J ; 19(1): 39, 2021 Jun 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1255939

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) associated coagulopathy (CAC) leads to thromboembolic events in a high number of critically ill COVID-19 patients. However, specific diagnostic or therapeutic algorithms for CAC have not been established. In the current study, we analyzed coagulation abnormalities with point-of-care testing (POCT) and their relation to hemostatic complications in patients suffering from COVID-19 induced Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). Our hypothesis was that specific diagnostic patterns can be identified in patients with COVID-19 induced ARDS at risk of thromboembolic complications utilizing POCT. METHODS: This is a single-center, retrospective observational study. Longitudinal data from 247 rotational thromboelastometries (Rotem®) and 165 impedance aggregometries (Multiplate®) were analysed in 18 patients consecutively admitted to the ICU with a COVID-19 induced ARDS between March 12th to June 30th, 2020. RESULTS: Median age was 61 years (IQR: 51-69). Median PaO2/FiO2 on admission was 122 mmHg (IQR: 87-189), indicating moderate to severe ARDS. Any form of hemostatic complication occurred in 78 % of the patients with deep vein/arm thrombosis in 39 %, pulmonary embolism in 22 %, and major bleeding in 17 %. In Rotem® elevated A10 and maximum clot firmness (MCF) indicated higher clot strength. The delta between EXTEM A10 minus FIBTEM A10 (ΔA10) > 30 mm, depicting the sole platelet-part of clot firmness, was associated with a higher risk of thromboembolic events (OD: 3.7; 95 %CI 1.3-10.3; p = 0.02). Multiplate® aggregometry showed hypoactive platelet function. There was no correlation between single Rotem® and Multiplate® parameters at intensive care unit (ICU) admission and thromboembolic or bleeding complications. CONCLUSIONS: Rotem® and Multiplate® results indicate hypercoagulability and hypoactive platelet dysfunction in COVID-19 induced ARDS but were all in all poorly related to hemostatic complications..

14.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 8: 603558, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1231346

ABSTRACT

Background: Accumulating evidence suggests that coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is associated with hypercoagulative status, particularly for critically ill patients in the intensive care unit. However, the prevalence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in these patients under routine prophylactic anticoagulation remains unknown. A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the prevalence of VTE in these patients by pooling the results of these observational studies. Methods: Observational studies that reported the prevalence of VTE in critically ill patients with COVID-19 were identified by searching the PubMed and Embase databases. A random-effect model was used to pool the results by incorporating the potential heterogeneity. Results: A total of 19 studies with 1,599 patients were included. The pooled results revealed that the prevalence of VTE, deep venous thrombosis (DVT), and pulmonary embolism (PE) in critically ill patients with COVID-19 was 28.4% [95% confidence interval (CI): 20.0-36.8%], 25.6% (95% CI: 17.8-33.4%), and 16.4% (95% CI: 10.1-22.7%), respectively. Limited to studies, in which all patients received routine prophylactic anticoagulation, and the prevalence for VTE, DVT, and PE was 30.1% (95% CI: 19.4-40.8%), 27.2% (95% CI: 16.5-37.9%), and 18.3% (95% CI: 9.8%-26.7%), respectively. The prevalence of DVT was higher in studies with routine screening for all patients, when compared to studies with screening only in clinically suspected patients (47.5% vs. 15.1%, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Critically ill patients with COVID-19 have a high prevalence of VTE, despite the use of present routine prophylactic anticoagulation.

15.
Arab J Gastroenterol ; 22(2): 177-179, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1230341

ABSTRACT

Despite the emerging data about the thrombophilic effect of the novel coronavirus [1] , the relation between coagulation disorders and the COVID-19 pandemic is still not well understood. Various studies pointed to the significant role of the COVID-19 induced cytokine storm in development of the hypercoagulable state which leads to serious thromboembolic complications [2,3] . Some studies report the development of severe immune thrombocytopenia induced by the novel coronavirus [4] . Other studies found a correlation between COVID-19 disease and the development of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) [5]. Patients with severe COVID-19 disease have an increased risk for development of gastrointestinal bleeding (GI) which may be related to stress [6] , critical illness or mechanical ventilation [7] . Further studies showed the ability of the novel coronavirus to infect the epithelial cells of the GI tract [8] . Moreover, some data pointed to the ability of the virus even to infect the endothelium of blood vessels [9]. The relation between the COVID-19 pandemic and GI bleeding deserves more studies [10]. We present a case of GI bleeding in a patient with severe COVID-19 disease. We assume that COVID-19 disease can be a predominant factor for the development of DIC and GI bleeding.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage/virology , Blood Coagulation Disorders , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Pandemics
16.
JCI Insight ; 6(9)2021 05 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1228934

ABSTRACT

SARS coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a novel viral pathogen that causes a clinical disease called coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Although most COVID-19 cases are asymptomatic or involve mild upper respiratory tract symptoms, a significant number of patients develop severe or critical disease. Patients with severe COVID-19 commonly present with viral pneumonia that may progress to life-threatening acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Patients with COVID-19 are also predisposed to venous and arterial thromboses that are associated with a poorer prognosis. The present study identified the emergence of a low-density inflammatory neutrophil (LDN) population expressing intermediate levels of CD16 (CD16Int) in patients with COVID-19. These cells demonstrated proinflammatory gene signatures, activated platelets, spontaneously formed neutrophil extracellular traps, and enhanced phagocytic capacity and cytokine production. Strikingly, CD16Int neutrophils were also the major immune cells within the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, exhibiting increased CXCR3 but loss of CD44 and CD38 expression. The percentage of circulating CD16Int LDNs was associated with D-dimer, ferritin, and systemic IL-6 and TNF-α levels and changed over time with altered disease status. Our data suggest that the CD16Int LDN subset contributes to COVID-19-associated coagulopathy, systemic inflammation, and ARDS. The frequency of that LDN subset in the circulation could serve as an adjunct clinical marker to monitor disease status and progression.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation Disorders/blood , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , Neutrophils/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Coagulation Disorders/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokines/blood , Female , GPI-Linked Proteins/blood , Hospitalization , Humans , Inflammation Mediators/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophils/classification , Pandemics , Phagocytosis , Platelet Activation , Receptors, IgG/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , Severity of Illness Index
17.
Adv Exp Med Biol ; 1318: 343-353, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1222723

ABSTRACT

Neurological manifestations of novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) are reported to occur in as much as 37% of the affected patients. These manifestations range from headache and dizziness to altered mental status and consciousness, anosmia, ageusia, sensory disturbances, and stroke. The mechanisms by which the neurological symptoms arise are not yet determined but may either proceed as an indirect consequence of systemic hyperinflammation or result from the direct invasion of the virus to neural and glial cells. The neural invasion can explain both the retrograde pathway of encephalitis and the early manifestation of anosmia by invading the olfactory bulb. Moreover, in the case of attacking the brain stem, it may take part in the early apnea manifestation reported by patients. Additionally, neurotropism of the virus could be the cause of acute hemorrhagic encephalitis. Hyperinflammation can have acute and prolonged effects in the nervous system, such as acute demyelination and predisposition to multiple sclerosis. Moreover, the pro-inflammatory state contributes to hypercoagulation, which in turn could result in cerebrovascular injuries in COVID-19 patients. This chapter would discuss that the neurologic manifestations of the COVID-19 are to be looked at as a multifactorial entangled phenomenon.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nervous System Diseases , Stroke , Headache , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Am J Case Rep ; 22: e930667, 2021 May 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1222298

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been associated with a hypercoagulability state. Clinical presentation can range from asymptomatic to severe illness and mortality. Thrombotic complications in COVID-19 have been associated with mortality. The incidence of systemic hypercoagulation in COVID-19 is associated with the process of severe inflammation. The majority of severely ill patients have developed coagulopathy, and this condition is associated with poor outcomes. CASE REPORT A 72-year-old man presented with respiratory symptoms and was diagnosed with a COVID-19 infection. He presented with tachypnea, tachycardia, increased blood pressure, and 74% peripheral oxygen saturation under 15 L/min oxygen per non-rebreather mask. Initial laboratory test results showed severe hypoxemia as per blood gas analysis (pH 7.42, pCO2 23 mmHg, pO2 43 mmHg, HCO3 15 mmol/L, base deficit -9 mmol/L), with increased procalcitonin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, D-dimer, fibrinogen, creatine kinase myocardial band, and Troponin I. He subsequently developed thrombosis of the pulmonary arteries and multiple branches of the pulmonary vein despite therapeutic anticoagulation. We initiated heparin therapy (average dose 25 191 units per day, mean activated partial thromboplastin time, 64.35 seconds). Radiological investigations revealed multiple thromboses on pulmonary arteries and pulmonary veins, as well as multiple locations of brain infarction. Rescue thrombolytic therapy was given, but unfortunately, the patient died due to multiple end-organ failures. CONCLUSIONS Controlling coagulopathy, and thrombolytic therapy type and timing, are critical issues, and new strategies must be sought to lower its morbidity and mortality rates further.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation Disorders , COVID-19 , Aged , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Blood Coagulation Disorders/drug therapy , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombolytic Therapy
19.
J Pharm Pract ; : 8971900211015055, 2021 May 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219520

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Emerging data suggest that coagulopathy, cytokine storm, and acute respiratory distress syndrome are associated with the 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19). The prevalence of hypercoagulable state in these patients is unknown, but appears to be higher compared to those with other critically ill patients. Elevated D-dimer, large blood vessels clots, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and disseminated intravascular coagulation have been reported in patients diagnosed with COVID-19 either on admission or during hospitalization and may be predictors of poor outcomes. METHODS: We performed a comprehensive literature review using the search terms of COVID-19; severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2, coagulopathy, thrombosis and anticoagulation in PubMed, Ovid, google scholar, Medline and EMBASE databases from December 2019 to May 30, 2020. RESULTS: A total of 64 relevant studies were reviewed; of which, 4 studies met the inclusion criteria and were included for analysis. The majority of the studies were retrospective involving 525 critically ill COVID-19 patients. The most commonly studied anticoagulant administered was low molecular weight heparins. Anticoagulation dosing varied throughout the studies and may be classified as standard venous thromboembolism prophylaxis, intermediate dosing, or full dose anticoagulation. The most studied objective was improvement in coagulopathy. Significant reduction in D-dimer, improvement in coagulopathy markers such as Interlukin-6, fibrinogen degradation product level, as well as lymphocyte count were reported. CONCLUSION: Despite the limited quality of studies analyzed, prophylaxis and higher intensity dosed anticoagulation is associated with improved pulmonary oxygenation, decreased coagulopathy markers and decreased mortality in COVID-19 patients.

20.
Neurologist ; 26(3): 108-111, 2021 May 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1214713

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been associated with a hypercoagulable state, increasing the risk for ischemic stroke. In select cases, patients are already on anticoagulation therapy. Such examples highlight the severity of COVID-19's hyperthrombotic state, and raise questions regarding optimal stroke prevention in these patients. CASE REPORT: An 84-year-ool male with past medical history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hypertension, and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation was admitted for respiratory failure secondary to COVID-19 pneumonia. He was continued on his home apixaban 5 mg twice daily. On day 2 of admission, he developed a new aphasia, and right-sided facial droop. Computed tomography (CT) head was unrevealing. CT angiography did not show large vessel occlusion. CT perfusion demonstrated a left middle cerebral artery ischemic penumbra, without core. He was not eligible for thrombolysis or thrombectomy interventions. Later CT head confirmed L middle cerebral artery infarct. The patient's D-dimer was 1,184 ng/mL on day 1 of admission, and increased to 111,574 by day 4. His hypoxia worsened, requiring intubation and transfer to the ICU. He experienced further clinical decline and eventual demise. CONCLUSION: Ischemic stroke in anticoagulated patients with COVID-19 has been previously reported. Such cases emphasize the severity of the coronavirus virus associated hypercoagulable state. A majority of reported cases have occurred in patients continuing their ambulatory therapy. Overall, such cases are likely underreported. There are current trials comparing therapeutic versus prophylactic dose anticoagulation in patients with COVID-19. There are no studies specifically addressing anticoagulation agent failure in these patients. Further research is required this area to determine the optimal therapy for patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Factor Xa Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Ischemic Stroke/etiology , Aged, 80 and over , Atrial Fibrillation/drug therapy , Fatal Outcome , Humans , Hypertension/drug therapy , Male , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/drug therapy , Pyrazoles/administration & dosage , Pyridones/administration & dosage
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