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1.
Indian J Palliat Care ; 26(Suppl 1): S36-S39, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1792226

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has become a global pandemic with the spectrum of disease from asymptomatic or mild disease to severe cases requiring intensive care unit (ICU) admission. In India, it started with milder presentation affecting younger population. Later on, an increase in disease severity was observed involving older age group as well. However, there is a paucity of published data regarding patients requiring ICU care in India. This case series describes the initial experience of an ICU in India regarding epidemiological profile, clinical course, and outcome of critically ill COVID-19 patients. METHODS: This case series included 27 consecutive laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 patients who were admitted in a tertiary care ICU over 14 days period, followed up till their discharge from ICU. Demographic and clinical data, including laboratory and radiological findings, were compiled with special attention to co-morbidities of the patients. The management of these patients was done as per the institutional protocol for critically ill COVID-19 patients. RESULTS: The median age of the patients was 50 years with no difference in gender. Comorbid conditions were seen in 85% of the patients with diabetes (43.7%) and hypertension (37.5%) as the most common conditions. The median duration of symptoms before admission was 6 days with fever as the most common clinical symptom at presentation. Chest roentogram showed bilateral lung infiltrates in 88.8% of the patients. Mild, moderate, and severe hypoxia were observed in 3, 8, and 16 patients, respectively. Ten patients were managed with oxygen therapy. Seventeen patients (62.9%) required ventilatory support. Mortality rate among patients admitted to our ICU was 59.2%. CONCLUSIONS: This case series shows middle-aged patients with comorbid diseases present with severe COVID-19 disease and have poor outcome.

2.
Pediatr Infect Dis J ; 40(7): 606-611, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1709106

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Therapies against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) and its life-threatening respiratory infection coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have been evaluated, including COVID-19 convalescent plasma (CCP). Multiple large reports of CCP treatment in adults exist. Pediatric data on CCP safety and efficacy are limited. METHODS: Single-center prospective, open-label trial looking at safety, antibody kinetics and outcomes of CCP (10 mL/kg, max 1 unit) treatment for COVID-19 in hospitalized pediatric patients with moderate to severe disease or at high-risk for serious illness. RESULTS: Thirteen patients were enrolled. No infusion-related adverse events occurred. No hematologic or metabolic adverse events were noted during hospitalization or at 3-weeks. Ten patients had clinical improvement by day 7 (WHO eight-category ordinal severity scale for COVID-19). Following CCP, anti-SARS-CoV-2 anti-nucleocapsid IgG increased significantly at 24 hours and high levels were sustained at 7- and 21-days. Transient IgM response was noted. Twelve patients (92.3%) were discharged home, 9 (75%) by day 7 post-CCP. One remained on invasive ventilatory support 42 days after CCP and was eventually discharged to an intermediate care facility. The single patient death was retrospectively confirmed to have had brain death before CCP. CONCLUSION: CCP was well tolerated in pediatric patients, resulted in rapid antibody increase, and did not appear to interfere with immune responses measured at 21 days. More pediatric data are necessary to establish the efficacy of CCP, but our data suggest benefit in moderate to severe COVID-19 when used early. Other immunologic or antiviral interventions may be added as supported by emerging data.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Adolescent , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Immunization, Passive/standards , Immunization, Passive/statistics & numerical data , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Kinetics , Male , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies
3.
Med Clin (Barc) ; 157(3): 114-117, 2021 08 13.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574083

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Several case series of ACS have been reported in COVID 19 patients. We aim to study its incidence, characteristics, and three-month prognosis. To put this incidence in perspective we compared it with the incidence of in-hospital ACS during the same period of 2019. METHODS: Observational multicenter cohort study of 3,108 COVID-19 patients admitted to two hospitals in Madrid between March 1st and May 15th, 2020. Ten patients suffered an ACS while being hospitalized for COVID 19 and were followed for three months. The ACS incidence in hospitalized patients during the same period of 2019 was also studied. RESULTS: The incidence of ACS in COVID-19 patients was 3.31 ‰, significantly higher than in the 2019 period, 1.01 ‰ (p = 0.013). COVID-19 patients that suffered and ACS frequently had a severe infection, presented with STEMI (80%), and had multivessel disease (67%). Mortality rate (30%) and hospital readmissions at three months (20%) were very high. CONCLUSIONS: Severe COVID-19 patients develop ACS more frequently than expected. Although the overall incidence was low, it carried a poor immediate and three-month prognosis.


Subject(s)
Acute Coronary Syndrome , COVID-19 , Acute Coronary Syndrome/diagnosis , Acute Coronary Syndrome/epidemiology , Causality , Cohort Studies , Hospitalization , Humans
4.
Eur J Neurol ; 28(8): 2603-2613, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518029

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Nasu-Hakola disease (NHD) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by skeletal and neurological symptoms. Behavioral symptoms with cognitive impairment may mimic the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) and other early-onset dementias. Our patients were analyzed and the literature was reviewed to delineate neurological and neuroimaging findings suggestive of NHD. METHOD: Fourteen patients carrying a pathogenic mutation in the TREM2 gene were found in our database. Demographic, clinical, laboratory and radiological data were retrieved and analyzed. RESULTS: The presenting clinical picture was behavioral changes with cognitive decline resembling bvFTD in all patients. The mean age was 37.1 ± 4.97 years and the mean duration of the disease was 8.9 ± 3.51 years. Only two patients had typical bone cysts. Seven patients had bilateral calcification of the basal ganglia in computed tomography of the brain. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed severe atrophy of the corpus callosum, enlargement of the ventricles, atrophy of the caudate nuclei and periventricular white matter changes in all patients. Symmetrical global atrophy of the brain mainly affecting frontoparietal and lateral temporal regions were observed in all cases, and 13 patients had atrophy of the hippocampus. Cerebrospinal fluid examination of 10 patients showed elevated protein levels in six and the presence of oligoclonal bands in four patients. CONCLUSION: A combination of white matter changes, enlarged ventricles, atrophy of the caudate nuclei and thinning of the corpus callosum in magnetic resonance imaging strongly suggests NHD in patients with FTD syndrome. Molecular genetic analysis should be performed in suspected cases, and families should receive genetic counseling.


Subject(s)
Frontotemporal Dementia , Lipodystrophy , Membrane Glycoproteins/genetics , Osteochondrodysplasias , Receptors, Immunologic/genetics , Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis , Adult , Brain/diagnostic imaging , Frontotemporal Dementia/diagnostic imaging , Frontotemporal Dementia/genetics , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Neuroimaging
5.
J Bone Joint Surg Am ; 102(12): e58, 2020 06 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1409847

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: From February 20 to April 2020, the coronavirus SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome)-CoV-2 spread in northern Italy, drastically challenging the care capacities of the national health care system. Unprepared for this emergency, hospitals have quickly reformulated paths of assistance in an effort to guarantee treatment for infected patients. Orthopaedic departments have been focused on elderly traumatology, especially the treatment of femoral neck fractures in patients with coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the orthopaedic management strategy for femoral fragility fractures in COVID-19-positive patients with the hypothesis that operative treatment may contribute to the overall stability of the patient. METHODS: Sixteen patients affected by proximal femoral fracture and a recent history of fever, shortness of breath, and desaturation were admitted to the emergency room. Thoracic computed tomography (CT) and oropharyngeal swabs confirmed that they were positive for COVID-19, requiring hospitalization and prophylaxis with low-molecular-weight heparin. RESULTS: Three patients died before surgery because of severe respiratory insufficiency and multiple-organ-failure syndrome. Ten patients underwent surgery on the day after admission, whereas 3 patients had suspended their use of direct thrombin inhibitors and needed surgery to be delayed until the third day after admission. In all patients except 1, we noted an improvement in terms of O2 saturation and assisted respiration. In 9 patients, hemodynamic and respiratory stability was observed at an average of 7 days postoperatively. Four patients who underwent surgical treatment died of respiratory failure on the first day after surgery (1 patient), the third day after surgery (2 patients), or the seventh day after surgery (1 patient). CONCLUSIONS: We noted a stabilization of respiratory parameters in 12 COVID-19-positive patients who underwent surgery treatment of proximal femoral fractures. We believe that in elderly patients with COVID-19 who have proximal femoral fractures, surgery may contribute to the overall stability of the patient, seated mobilization, improvement in physiological ventilation, and general patient comfort in bed. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Prognostic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/adverse effects , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Femoral Fractures/surgery , Fracture Fixation, Intramedullary/adverse effects , Frailty/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Femoral Fractures/mortality , Femoral Fractures/virology , Frailty/mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Italy , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Int J Mol Sci ; 21(13)2020 Jul 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389380

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 virus is a recently-emerged zoonotic pathogen already well adapted to transmission and replication in humans. Although the mutation rate is limited, recently introduced mutations in SARS-CoV-2 have the potential to alter viral fitness. In addition to amino acid changes, mutations could affect RNA secondary structure critical to viral life cycle, or interfere with sequences targeted by host miRNAs. We have analysed subsets of genomes from SARS-CoV-2 isolates from around the globe and show that several mutations introduce changes in Watson-Crick pairing, with resultant changes in predicted secondary structure. Filtering to targets matching miRNAs expressed in SARS-CoV-2-permissive host cells, we identified ten separate target sequences in the SARS-CoV-2 genome; three of these targets have been lost through conserved mutations. A genomic site targeted by the highly abundant miR-197-5p, overexpressed in patients with cardiovascular disease, is lost by a conserved mutation. Our results are compatible with a model that SARS-CoV-2 replication within the human host is constrained by host miRNA defences. The impact of these and further mutations on secondary structures, miRNA targets or potential splice sites offers a new context in which to view future SARS-CoV-2 evolution, and a potential platform for engineering conditional attenuation to vaccine development, as well as providing a better understanding of viral tropism and pathogenesis.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , Genome, Viral , MicroRNAs/metabolism , RNA, Viral/chemistry , 3' Untranslated Regions , Base Sequence , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Databases, Genetic , Humans , MicroRNAs/chemistry , MicroRNAs/genetics , Mutation , Nucleic Acid Conformation , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , RNA Splice Sites , RNA Splicing , SARS-CoV-2 , Sequence Alignment , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics , Viral Proteins/chemistry , Viral Proteins/genetics , Viral Proteins/metabolism
7.
J Thromb Haemost ; 18(7): 1747-1751, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317985

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Few observations exist with respect to the pro-coagulant profile of patients with COVID-19 acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Reports of thromboembolic complications are scarce but suggestive for a clinical relevance of the problem. OBJECTIVES: Prospective observational study aimed to characterize the coagulation profile of COVID-19 ARDS patients with standard and viscoelastic coagulation tests and to evaluate their changes after establishment of an aggressive thromboprophylaxis. METHODS: Sixteen patients with COVID-19 ARDS received a complete coagulation profile at the admission in the intensive care unit. Ten patients were followed in the subsequent 7 days, after increasing the dose of low molecular weight heparin, antithrombin levels correction, and clopidogrel in selected cases. RESULTS: At baseline, the patients showed a pro-coagulant profile characterized by an increased clot strength (CS, median 55 hPa, 95% interquartile range 35-63), platelet contribution to CS (PCS, 43 hPa; interquartile range 24-45), fibrinogen contribution to CS (FCS, 12 hPa; interquartile range 6-13.5) elevated D-dimer levels (5.5 µg/mL, interquartile range 2.5-6.5), and hyperfibrinogenemia (794 mg/dL, interquartile range 583-933). Fibrinogen levels were associated (R2  = .506, P = .003) with interleukin-6 values. After increasing the thromboprophylaxis, there was a significant (P = .001) time-related decrease of fibrinogen levels, D-dimers (P = .017), CS (P = .013), PCS (P = .035), and FCS (P = .038). CONCLUSION: The pro-coagulant pattern of these patients may justify the clinical reports of thromboembolic complications (pulmonary embolism) during the course of the disease. Further studies are needed to assess the best prophylaxis and treatment of this condition.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Blood Coagulation Disorders/blood , Blood Coagulation , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Aged , Anticoagulants/administration & dosage , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Coagulation/drug effects , Blood Coagulation Disorders/diagnosis , Blood Coagulation Disorders/drug therapy , Blood Coagulation Disorders/virology , Blood Coagulation Tests , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Fibrinolytic Agents/administration & dosage , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
8.
Lancet Glob Health ; 9(7): e925-e931, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1303720

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Detection of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies among people at risk of infection is crucial for understanding both the past transmission of COVID-19 and vulnerability of the population to continuing transmission and, when done serially, the intensity of ongoing transmission over an interval in a community. We aimed to estimate the seroprevalence of COVID-19 in a representative population-based cohort in Iquitos, one of the regions with the highest mortality rates from COVID-19 in Peru, where a devastating number of cases occurred in March, 2020. METHODS: We did a population-based study of SARS-CoV-2 transmission in Iquitos at two timepoints: July 13-18, 2020 (baseline), and Aug 13-18, 2020 (1-month follow-up). We obtained a geographically stratified representative sample of the city population using the 2017 census data, which was updated on Jan 20, 2020. We included people who were inhabitants of Iquitos since COVID-19 was identified in Peru (March 6, 2020) or earlier. We excluded people living in institutions, people receiving any pharmacological treatment for COVID-19, people with any contraindication for phlebotomy, and health workers or individuals living with an active health worker. We tested each participant for IgG and IgM anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies using the COVID-19 IgG/IgM Rapid Test (Zhejiang Orient Gene Biotech, China). We used survey analysis methods to estimate seroprevalence accounting for the sampling design effect and test performance characteristics. FINDINGS: We identified 726 eligible individuals and enrolled a total of 716 participants (99%), distributed across 40 strata (four districts, two sexes, and five age groups). We excluded ten individuals who: did not have consent from a parent or legal representative (n=3), had moved to Iquitos after March 6, 2020 (n=3), were in transit (n=2), or had respiratory symptoms (n=1). After adjusting for the study sampling effects and sensitivity and specificity of the test, we estimated a seroprevalence of 70% (95% CI 67-73) at baseline and 66% (95% CI 62-70) at 1 month of follow-up, with a test-retest positivity of 65% (95% CI 61-68), and an incidence of new exposures of 2% (95% CI 1-3). We observed significant differences in the seroprevalence between age groups, with participants aged 18-29 years having lower seroprevalence than those aged younger than 12 years (prevalence ratio 0·85 [95% CI 0·73-0·98]; p=0·029). INTERPRETATION: After the first epidemic peak, Iquitos had one of the highest rates of seroprevalence of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies worldwide. Nevertheless, the city experienced a second wave starting in January, 2021, probably due to the emergence of the SARS-CoV-2 P1 variant, which has shown higher transmissibility and reinfection rates. FUNDING: Dirección Regional de Salud de Loreto (DIRESA), Loreto, Peru. TRANSLATION: For the Spanish translation of the abstract see Supplementary Materials section.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Child , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Peru/epidemiology , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Young Adult
9.
Med Sci Monit ; 27: e929701, 2021 Jun 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1292186

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND At the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, a cluster outbreak caused by an imported case from Hubei Province was reported in Xi'an City, Shaanxi Province, China. Ten patients from 2 families and 1 hospital were involved in the transmission. MATERIAL AND METHODS We conducted an epidemiological investigation to identify the cluster transmission of COVID-19. The demographic, epidemiological, clinical, laboratory, and cluster characteristics were described and analyzed. RESULTS From January 27 to February 13, 2020, a total of 10 individuals were confirmed to be infected with SARS-CoV-2 by the nucleic acid testing of nasopharyngeal swabs from 2 families and 1 hospital. Among the confirmed cases, 7 had atypical clinical symptoms and 3 were asymptomatic. The median times from onset to diagnosis and to discharge were 3.5 days (range, 1-5 days) and 19.5 days (range, 16-38 days), respectively. There were 4 patients whose exposure dates were 1, 3, 3, and 2 days earlier than the onset dates of their previous-generation cases, respectively. Four prevention and control measures were effectively used to interrupt the disease transmission. CONCLUSIONS SARS-CoV-2 can be easily transmitted within families and in hospitals, and asymptomatic patients could act as a source of disease transmission. The results of this outbreak at the early epidemic stage support the recommendation that individuals with confirmed COVID-19 and all their close contacts should be subjected to medical quarantined observation and nucleic acid screening as early as possible, even if they do not have any symptoms. Meanwhile, people in high-risk areas should improve their protective measures.


Subject(s)
Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Carrier State/prevention & control , Carrier State/transmission , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/methods , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Mass Screening/methods , Middle Aged , Quarantine/methods , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , Young Adult
10.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 411, 2021 Jun 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1280581

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Provision of contraception to women in the immediate postnatal period has been endorsed by professional bodies, to reduce the incidence of short inter-pregnancy intervals. This study examined the views of postnatal women and practising midwives regarding provision of contraceptive advice and contraceptive methods by midwives, in a region of the United Kingdom. METHODS: A mixed-method approach using qualitative interviews with midwives, and a postnatal survey followed by qualitative interviews with postnatal women, in five hospitals in the East of England. Twenty-one practising midwives and ten women were interviewed. Two hundred and twenty-seven women returned a survey. Survey data was analysed descriptively, augmented by Student's t-tests and Chi-squared tests to examine associations within the data. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed guided by the phases of thematic analysis. RESULTS: Midwives and women supported the concept of increased midwifery provision of contraceptive advice, and provision of contraceptive methods in the postnatal period. Convenience and an established trusting relationship were reasons for preferring midwifery provision over visiting a doctor for contraception. The best time for detailed discussion was reported to be antenatal and community visits. The Progesterone-only-pill (POP) was the method, in which women indicated most interest postnatally. Concerns for midwives included the need for increased education on contraceptive methods and training in supplying these. Structural barriers to such provision were time pressures, low prioritisation of contraceptive training and disputes over funding. CONCLUSIONS: Women reported interest in midwives supplying contraceptive methods and expressed the view that this would be convenient and highly acceptable. Midwives are supportive of the concept of providing enhanced contraceptive advice and methods to women in their care, and believe that it would be advantageous for women. Institutional support is required to overcome structural barriers such as poor access to continuous professional development, and to allow contraceptive provision to be fully recognised as integral to the midwifery role, rather than a marginalised addition.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Birth Intervals , Contraception , Mothers , Nurse Midwives , Patient Participation , Postnatal Care , Adult , Cohort Studies , England , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Postpartum Period , Pregnancy , State Medicine , Young Adult
11.
J Integr Med ; 18(5): 395-400, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263333

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has raised concern around the world as an epidemic or pandemic. As data on COVID-19 has grown, it has become clear that older adults have a disproportionately high rate of death from COVID-19. This study describes the early clinical characteristics of COVID-19 in patients with more than 80 years of age. METHODS: Epidemiological, clinical, laboratory, radiological, and treatment data from 17 patients diagnosed with COVID-19 between January 20 and February 20, 2020 were collected and analyzed retrospectively. Treatment outcomes among subgroups of patients with non-severe and severe symptoms of COVID-19 were compared. RESULTS: Of the 17 hospitalized patients with COVID-19, the median age was 88.0 years (interquartile range, 86.6-90.0 years; range, 80.0-100.0 years) and 12 (70.6%) were men. The age distribution of patients was not significantly different between non-severe group and severe group. All patients had chronic pre-existing conditions. Hypertension and cardiovascular diseases were the most common chronic conditions in both subgroups. The most common symptoms at the onset of COVID-19 were fever (n = 13; 76.5%), fatigue (n = 11; 64.7%), and cough (n = 5; 29.4%). Lymphopenia was observed in all patients, and lymphopenia was significantly more severe in the severe group than that in non-severe group (0.4 × 109/L vs 1.2 × 109/L, P = 0.014). The level of serum creatinine was higher in the severe group than in the non-severe group (99.0 µmol/L vs 62.5 µmol/L, P = 0.038). The most common features of chest computed tomography images were nodular foci in 10 (58.8%) patients and pleural thickening in 7 (41.2%) patients. All patients received antiviral therapy, while some patients also received intravenous antibiotics therapy (76.5%), Chinese medicinal preparation therapy (Lianhuaqingwen capsule, 64.7%), corticosteroids (35.3%) or immunoglobin (29.4%). Eight patients (47.1%) were transferred to the intensive care unit because of complications. Ten patients (58.8%) received intranasal oxygen, while 3 (17.6%) received non-invasive mechanical ventilation, and 4 (23.5%) received high-flow oxygen. As of June 20, 7 (41.2%) patients had been discharged and 10 (58.8% of this cohort, 77.8% of severe patients) had died. CONCLUSION: The mortality of patients aged 80 years and older with severe COVID-19 symptoms was high. Lymphopenia was a characteristic laboratory result in these patients, and the severity of lymphopenia was indicative of the severity of COVID-19. However, the majority of patients with COVID-19 in this age cohort had atypical symptoms, and early diagnosis depends on prompt use of a viral nucleic acid test.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Age Factors , Aged, 80 and over , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , China/epidemiology , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/pathology , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Treatment Outcome
12.
Acta Haematol ; 144(6): 620-626, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263968

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Currently, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) infection is a major public health problem worldwide. Although most patients present a mild infection, effective strategies are required for patients who develop the severe disease. Anti-inflammatory treatment with JAK inhibitors has been considered in SARS-CoV-2. METHODS: In this study, we presented our experience in a group of severe SARS-CoV-2 Chilean patients. This prospective study was performed on consecutive patients presenting severe respiratory failure owing to COVID-19 or high-risk clinical condition associated with SARS-CoV-2, and who were treated with ruxolitinib for management of associated inflammation. Overall, 18 patients presenting SARS-CoV-2 viral-induced hyperinflammation were treated with ruxolitinib, with 16 patients previously treated with steroids, 4 with tocilizumab, and 3 with both treatments. RESULTS: Ten patients evolved with favorable response, including 7 patients admitted with severe respiratory failure (PaFi less than 200 mm Hg in high-flow nasal cannula), presenting complete regression of hyperinflammation, regression of the lung lesions, and subsequent discharge. In the remaining 8 patients, 25% showed reduced inflammation, but early discharge was not achieved owing to the slow evolution of respiratory failure. Unfortunately, 3 patients demonstrated a severe respiratory failure. The early initiation of ruxolitinib was found to be associated with better clinical evolution (p < 0.005). CONCLUSION: In this study, ruxolitinib resolved hyperinflammatory state in 55% of the patients, regardless of the previous steroid or tocilizumab therapy. Unfortunately, few patients demonstrated severe evolution despite ruxolitinib therapy. Notably, the treatment starting time appears to play an important role in achieving good outcomes. Further validation in randomized controlled trials is crucial.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Inflammation/drug therapy , Nitriles/therapeutic use , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Pyrazoles/therapeutic use , Pyrimidines/therapeutic use , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Chile , Female , Humans , Inflammation/etiology , Male , Middle Aged , Nitriles/adverse effects , Prospective Studies , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Pyrazoles/adverse effects , Pyrimidines/adverse effects , Respiratory Insufficiency/drug therapy , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Steroids/therapeutic use , Thrombocytopenia/etiology , Treatment Outcome
13.
EClinicalMedicine ; 36: 100926, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1261877

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Hyperimmune anti-COVID-19 Intravenous Immunoglobulin (C-IVIG) is an unexplored therapy amidst the rapidly evolving spectrum of medical therapies for COVID-19 and is expected to counter the three most life-threatening consequences of COVID-19 including lung injury by the virus, cytokine storm and sepsis. METHODS: A single center, phase I/II, randomized controlled, single-blinded trial was conducted at Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, Pakistan. Participants were COVID-19 infected individuals, classified as either severely or critically ill with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). Participants were randomized through parallel-group design with sequential assignment in a 4:1 allocation to either intervention group with four C-IVIG dosage arms (0.15, 0.20, 0.25, 0.30 g/kg), or control group receiving standard of care only (n = 10). Primary outcomes were 28-day mortality, patient's clinical status on ordinal scale and Horowitz index (HI), and were analysed in all randomized participants that completed the follow-up period (intention-to-treat population). The trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov (NCT04521309). FINDINGS: Fifty participants were enrolled in the study from June 19, 2020 to February 3, 2021 with a mean age of 56.54±13.2 years of which 22 patients (44%) had severe and 28 patients (56%) had critical COVID-19. Mortality occurred in ten of 40 participants (25%) in intervention group compared to six of ten (60%) in control group, with relative risk reduction in intervention arm I (RR, 0.333; 95% CI, 0.087-1.272), arm II (RR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.171-1.463), arm III (RR, 0.167; 95% CI, 0.024-1.145), and arm IV (RR, 0.667; 95% CI, 0.268-1.660). In intervention group, median HI significantly improved to 359 mmHg [interquartile range (IQR) 127-400, P = 0.009)] by outcome day, while the clinical status of intervention group also improved as compared to control group, with around 15 patients (37.5%) being discharged by 7th day with complete recovery. Additionally, resolution of chest X-rays and restoration of biomarkers to normal levels were also seen in intervention groups. No drug-related adverse events were reported during the study. INTERPRETATION: Administration of C-IVIG in severe and critical COVID-19 patients was safe, increased the chance of survival and reduced the risk of disease progression. FUNDING: Higher Education Commission (HEC), Pakistan (Ref no. 20-RRG-134/RGM/R&D/HEC/2020).

14.
Respir Med ; 185: 106495, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1260857

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Organ tropism of SARS-CoV-2 to the respiratory tract could potentially aggravate asthma. The susceptibility of patients with asthma to develop an exacerbation when they are infected with SARS-CoV-2 is unknown. We aimed to investigate the symptoms presented in patients with asthma who became infected with SARS-CoV-2. METHODS AND RESULTS: All patients over 14 years of age who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 (by RT-PCR) were included (n = 2995). In patients with asthma (n = 77, 2.6%; 44 females), symptoms, therapy and phenotype were recorded. Seventeen (22%) patients had mild asthma, 55 (71%) moderate and five severe (6%). Twenty-six patients with asthma (34%) were asymptomatic, 34 (44%) developed symptoms but did not require hospital admission, and 17 (22%) were hospitalised. One patient was admitted because of asthma exacerbation without pneumonia or other symptoms. Ten patients (13%) had wheezes (six with pneumonia). Comparison of wheezing between patients with non-T2 asthma and the rest of the patients was statistically significant, (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: SARS-CoV-2 infection is not a significant cause of asthma exacerbation, although some patients may present wheezing, especially in cases of pneumonia. The severity of asthma does not seem to be associated with symptoms of the disease.


Subject(s)
Asthma/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Asthma/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index
15.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(4): e26994, 2021 04 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1256255

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Accompanying the rising rates of reported mental distress during the COVID-19 pandemic has been a reported increase in the use of digital technologies to manage health generally, and mental health more specifically. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to systematically examine whether there was a COVID-19 pandemic-related increase in the self-reported use of digital mental health tools and other technologies to manage mental health. METHODS: We analyzed results from a survey of 5907 individuals in the United States using Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk); the survey was administered during 4 week-long periods in 2020 and survey respondents were from all 50 states and Washington DC. The first set of analyses employed two different logistic regression models to estimate the likelihood of having symptoms indicative of clinical depression and anxiety, respectively, as a function of the rate of COVID-19 cases per 10 people and survey time point. The second set employed seven different logistic regression models to estimate the likelihood of using seven different types of digital mental health tools and other technologies to manage one's mental health, as a function of symptoms indicative of clinical depression and anxiety, rate of COVID-19 cases per 10 people, and survey time point. These models also examined potential interactions between symptoms of clinical depression and anxiety, respectively, and rate of COVID-19 cases. All models controlled for respondent sociodemographic characteristics and state fixed effects. RESULTS: Higher COVID-19 case rates were associated with a significantly greater likelihood of reporting symptoms of depression (odds ratio [OR] 2.06, 95% CI 1.27-3.35), but not anxiety (OR 1.21, 95% CI 0.77-1.88). Survey time point, a proxy for time, was associated with a greater likelihood of reporting clinically meaningful symptoms of depression and anxiety (OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.12-1.27 and OR 1.12, 95% CI 1.05-1.19, respectively). Reported symptoms of depression and anxiety were associated with a greater likelihood of using each type of technology. Higher COVID-19 case rates were associated with a significantly greater likelihood of using mental health forums, websites, or apps (OR 2.70, 95% CI 1.49-4.88), and other health forums, websites, or apps (OR 2.60, 95% CI 1.55-4.34). Time was associated with increased odds of reported use of mental health forums, websites, or apps (OR 1.20, 95% CI 1.11-1.30), phone-based or text-based crisis lines (OR 1.20, 95% CI 1.10-1.31), and online, computer, or console gaming/video gaming (OR 1.12, 95% CI 1.05-1.19). Interactions between COVID-19 case rate and mental health symptoms were not significantly associated with any of the technology types. CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggested increased use of digital mental health tools and other technologies over time during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic. As such, additional effort is urgently needed to consider the quality of these products, either by ensuring users have access to evidence-based and evidence-informed technologies and/or by providing them with the skills to make informed decisions around their potential efficacy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Mental Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Mental Health , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Disorders/therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires , Technology , United States/epidemiology
16.
Immun Inflamm Dis ; 9(3): 1037-1043, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1251989

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Long-COVID is emerging as a significant problem among individuals who recovered from COVID-19. Scant information is available on the prevalence, characteristics, and risk factors for long-COVID among people living with HIV (PLHIV). SETTING: A tertiary level, private, HIV clinic in western India. METHODS: A prospective, observational study was conducted to assess the prevalence of long-COVID among PLHIV. Long-COVID was defined as the presence of at least one symptom after 30 days of illness onset. A questionnaire for assessing general, cardiorespiratory, neuro-psychiatric, and gastro-intestinal symptoms was used to screen individuals with history of confirmed COVID-19. Data on demographics, HIV-related variables, comorbidities, and severity of COVID-19 were abstracted from electronic medical records. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression were used to identify risk factors for long-COVID. RESULTS: Ninety-four PLHIV were screened for long-COVID. Median (interquartile range [IQR]) age was 51 (47-56) years and 73.4% were males. The majority (76.6%) had a history of asymptomatic-mild COVID-19 illness. The prevalence of long-COVID was 43.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 33.4-54.2). Moderate-severe COVID-19 illness was significantly associated with long-COVID (adjusted odds ratio, 4.7; 95% CI, 1.4-17.9; p = .016). Among individuals with long-COVID, cough (22.3%) and fatigue (19.1%) were the commonest symptoms. The median (IQR) duration for resolution of symptoms was 15 (7-30) days. Ten individuals (10.6%) had persistent symptoms at a median of 109 days since the onset of COVID-19. CONCLUSION: Long-COVID is common among PLHIV with moderate-severe acute COVID-19 illness. There is a need for integration of long-COVID diagnosis and care services within antiretroviral therapy clinics for PLHIV with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , HIV Infections , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Humans , India/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies
17.
J Oral Maxillofac Surg ; 79(8): 1629-1642, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1248986

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Approximately 3-15% of COVID-19 patients will require prolonged mechanical ventilation thereby requiring consideration for tracheotomy. Guidelines for tracheotomy in this cohort of patients are therefore required with assessed outcomes of tracheotomies. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A retrospective chart review was performed of COVID-19 patients undergoing tracheotomy. Inclusion criteria were the performance of a tracheotomy in COVID-19 positive patients between March 11 and December 31, 2020. Exclusion criteria were lack of consent, extubation prior to the performance of a tracheotomy, death prior to the performance of the tracheotomy, and COVID-19 patients undergoing tracheotomy who tested negative twice after medical treatment. The primary predictor variable was the performance of a tracheotomy in COVID-19 positive patients and the primary outcome variable was the time to cessation of mechanical ventilation with the institution of supplemental oxygen via trach mask. RESULTS: Seventeen tracheotomies were performed between 4-25 days following intubation (mean = 17 days). Seven patients died between 4 and 16 days (mean = 8.7 days) following tracheotomy and 10 living patients realized cessation of mechanical ventilation from 4 hours to 61 days following tracheotomy (mean = 19.3 days). These patients underwent tracheotomy between 4 and 22 days following intubation (mean = 14 days). The 7 patients who died following tracheotomy underwent the procedure between 7 and 25 days following intubation (mean = 18.2 days). Seven patients underwent tracheotomy on or after 20 days of intubation and 3 survived (43%). Ten patients underwent tracheotomy before 20 days of intubation and 7 patients survived (70%). Significant differences between the mortality groups were detected for age (P = .006), and for P/F ratio at time of consult (P = .047) and the time of tracheotomy (P = .03). CONCLUSIONS: Tracheotomies are safely performed in COVID-19 patients with a standardized protocol. The timing of tracheotomy in COVID-19 patients is based on ventilator parameters, P/F ratio, patient prognosis, patient advanced directives, and family wishes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Tracheotomy , Humans , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tracheostomy
18.
Muscle Nerve ; 64(2): 215-219, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1245512

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION/AIMS: Cortical hyperexcitability is a feature of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and cortical excitability can be measured using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Resting motor threshold (MT) is a measure of cortical excitability, largely driven by glutamate. Perampanel, a glutamate α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor blocker, is predicted to increase the cortical excitability threshold. This study aimed to evaluate TMS to functionally assess target engagement in a study of perampanel in ALS. METHOD: We studied the MT of ALS patients randomized to a single dose of perampanel or placebo 5:1 hourly for 4 h. Twelve patients participated at 4 mg and 7 returned for dosing and retesting at 8 mg. The study was terminated in April 2020 due to coronavirus disease 2019-related restrictions, after 7 out of 12 planned patients had received the 8 mg dose. Serum concentrations were also measured. RESULTS: Ten patients received the 4 mg dose (2 received placebo) and 5 received the 8 mg dose (2 received placebo). Motor Threshold increased at 2 h after dosing in the combined treatment group +7% of maximal stimulator output (P < .01). Change could be detected in the larger 4 mg group (P = .02), but not in the smaller 8 mg dose group (P = .1). No side effects were reported after single dose exposure. DISCUSSION: This study shows that perampanel effects the physiology of upper motor neurons. Studies aiming at gauging the effect of perampanel on ALS disease progression are already ongoing. Motor threshold may serve as a marker of biological target engagement.


Subject(s)
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/drug therapy , Cortical Excitability/drug effects , Motor Neurons/drug effects , Pyridones/administration & dosage , Receptors, AMPA/antagonists & inhibitors , Aged , Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/blood , Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/diagnosis , Cortical Excitability/physiology , Double-Blind Method , Evoked Potentials, Motor/drug effects , Evoked Potentials, Motor/physiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Motor Neurons/physiology , Nitriles , Pilot Projects , Pyridones/blood , Receptors, AMPA/physiology , Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation/methods
19.
Lancet Rheumatol ; 3(8): e585-e594, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1244857

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are at risk of developing COVID-19 due to underlying immune abnormalities and regular use of immunosuppressant medications. We aimed to evaluate the presence of SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies in patients with SLE with or without previous COVID-19-related symptoms or RT-PCR-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection. METHODS: For this analysis, we included patients with SLE from two cohorts based in New York City: the Web-based Assessment of Autoimmune, Immune-Mediated and Rheumatic Patients during the COVID-19 pandemic (WARCOV) study; and the NYU Lupus Cohort (a prospective registry of patients at NYU Langone Health and NYC Health + Hospitals/Bellevue). Patients in both cohorts were tested for SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies via commercially available immunoassays, processed through hospital or outpatient laboratories. Patients recruited from the NYU Lupus Cohort, referred from affiliated providers, or admitted to hospital with COVID-19 were tested for SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies as part of routine surveillance during follow-up clinical visits. FINDINGS: 329 patients with SLE were included in this analysis, 146 from the WARCOV study and 183 from the NYU Lupus Cohort, and were tested for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies between April 29, 2020, and Feb 9, 2021. 309 (94%) were women and 91 (28%) were of Hispanic ethnicity. 51 (16%) of 329 patients had a positive SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibody test. Seropositive patients were more likely than seronegative patients to be Hispanic (24 [47%] of 51 vsz 67 [24%] of 278). Other demographic variables, SLE-specific factors, and immunosuppressant use were not associated with SARS-CoV-2 positivity. Of the 29 patients with COVID-19 previously confirmed by RT-PCR, 18 (62%) were on immunosuppressants; 24 (83%) of 29 patients tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies. Of 17 patients who had symptoms of COVID-19 but negative concurrent RT-PCR testing, one (6%) developed an antibody response. Of 26 patients who had COVID-19-related symptoms but did not undergo RT-PCR testing, six (23%) developed an antibody response. Of 83 patients who had no symptoms of COVID-19 and no RT-PCR testing, four (5%) developed an antibody response. Among 36 patients who were initially SARS-CoV-2 IgG positive, the majority maintained reactivity serially (88% up to 10 weeks, 83% up to 20 weeks, and 80% up to 30 weeks). Seven (70%) of ten patients with confirmed COVID-19 had antibody positivity beyond 30 weeks from disease onset. INTERPRETATION: Most patients with SLE and confirmed COVID-19 were able to produce and maintain a serological response despite the use of a variety of immunosuppressants, providing reassurance about the efficacy and durability of humoral immunity and possible protection against re-infection with SARS-CoV-2. FUNDING: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, and Bloomberg Philanthropies COVID-19 Response Initiative Grant.

20.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 10678, 2021 05 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1238016

ABSTRACT

With an urgent need for bedside imaging of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), this study's main goal was to assess inter- and intraobserver agreement in lung ultrasound (LUS) of COVID-19 patients. In this single-center study we prospectively acquired and evaluated 100 recorded ten-second cine-loops in confirmed COVID-19 intensive care unit (ICU) patients. All loops were rated by ten observers with different subspeciality backgrounds for four times by each observer (400 loops overall) in a random sequence using a web-based rating tool. We analyzed inter- and intraobserver variability for specific pathologies and a semiquantitative LUS score. Interobserver agreement for both, identification of specific pathologies and assignment of LUS scores was fair to moderate (e.g., LUS score 1 Fleiss' κ = 0.27; subpleural consolidations Fleiss' κ = 0.59). Intraobserver agreement was mostly moderate to substantial with generally higher agreement for more distinct findings (e.g., lowest LUS score 0 vs. highest LUS score 3 (median Fleiss' κ = 0.71 vs. 0.79) or air bronchograms (median Fleiss' κ = 0.72)). Intraobserver consistency was relatively low for intermediate LUS scores (e.g. LUS Score 1 median Fleiss' κ = 0.52). We therefore conclude that more distinct LUS findings (e.g., air bronchograms, subpleural consolidations) may be more suitable for disease monitoring, especially with more than one investigator and that training material used for LUS in point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) should pay refined attention to areas such as B-line quantification and differentiation of intermediate LUS scores.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Point-of-Care Systems , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Monitoring, Physiologic , Observer Variation , Prospective Studies , Ultrasonography
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