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1.
Stroke ; 52(5): e117-e130, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1195876
2.
BMC Neurol ; 20(1): 358, 2020 Sep 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-792799

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) global pandemic is associated with an increased incidence of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) secondary to large vessel occlusion (LVO). The treatment of these patients poses unique and significant challenges to health care providers requiring changes in existing protocols. CASE PRESENTATION: A 54-year-old COVID-19 positive patient developed sudden onset left hemiparesis secondary to an acute right middle cerebral artery occlusion (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score = 11). Mechanical thrombectomy (MT) was performed under a new protocol specifically designed to maximize protective measures for the team involved in the care of the patient. Mechanical Thrombectomy was performed successfully under general anesthesia resulting in TICI 3 recanalization. With regards to time metrics, time from door to reperfusion was 60 mins. The 24-h NIHSS score decreased to 2. Patient was discharged after 19 days after improvement of her pulmonary status with modified Rankin Scale = 1. CONCLUSION: Patients infected by COVID-19 can develop LVO that is multifactorial in etiology. Mechanical thrombectomy in a COVID-19 confirmed patient presenting with AIS due to LVO is feasible with current mechanical thrombectomy devices. A change in stroke workflow and protocols is now necessary in order to deliver the appropriate life-saving therapy for COVID-19 positive patients while protecting medical providers.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Endovascular Procedures/methods , Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery/surgery , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Thrombectomy/methods , Betacoronavirus , Brain Ischemia/complications , Brain Ischemia/diagnostic imaging , Brain Ischemia/surgery , COVID-19 , Cerebral Angiography , Computed Tomography Angiography , Emergency Medical Services , Female , Humans , Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery/complications , Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery/diagnostic imaging , Intubation, Intratracheal , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Reperfusion , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/complications , Stroke/diagnostic imaging , Stroke/surgery , Time-to-Treatment , Treatment Outcome
3.
Front Immunol ; 11: 1648, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-685338

ABSTRACT

Cytokine storm is an acute hyperinflammatory response that may be responsible for critical illness in many conditions including viral infections, cancer, sepsis, and multi-organ failure. The phenomenon has been implicated in critically ill patients infected with SARS-CoV-2, the novel coronavirus implicated in COVID-19. Critically ill COVID-19 patients experiencing cytokine storm are believed to have a worse prognosis and increased fatality rate. In SARS-CoV-2 infected patients, cytokine storm appears important to the pathogenesis of several severe manifestations of COVID-19: acute respiratory distress syndrome, thromboembolic diseases such as acute ischemic strokes caused by large vessel occlusion and myocardial infarction, encephalitis, acute kidney injury, and vasculitis (Kawasaki-like syndrome in children and renal vasculitis in adult). Understanding the pathogenesis of cytokine storm will help unravel not only risk factors for the condition but also therapeutic strategies to modulate the immune response and deliver improved outcomes in COVID-19 patients at high risk for severe disease. In this article, we present an overview of the cytokine storm and its implications in COVID-19 settings and identify potential pathways or biomarkers that could be targeted for therapy. Leveraging expert opinion, emerging evidence, and a case-based approach, this position paper provides critical insights on cytokine storm from both a prognostic and therapeutic standpoint.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Critical Care/methods , Cytokines/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/therapeutic use , CD4-CD8 Ratio , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19 , Clinical Decision-Making/methods , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Critical Illness , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Female , Humans , Immunocompromised Host , Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Janus Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Male , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Thrombosis
4.
Stroke ; 51(8): 2593-2596, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-680787

ABSTRACT

During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, the World Health Organization recommended measures to mitigate the outbreak such as social distancing and confinement. Since these measures have been put in place, anecdotal reports describe a decrease in the number of endovascular therapy (EVT) treatments for acute ischemic stroke due to large vessel occlusion. The purpose of our study was to determine the effect on EVT for patients with acute ischemic stroke during the COVID-19 confinement. In this retrospective, observational study, data were collected from November 1, 2019, to April 15, 2020, at 17 stroke centers in countries where confinement measures have been in place since March 2020 for the COVID-19 pandemic (Switzerland, Italy, France, Spain, Portugal, Germany, Canada, and United States). This study included 1600 patients treated by EVT for acute ischemic stroke. Date of EVT and symptom onset-to-groin puncture time were collected. Mean number of EVTs performed per hospital per 2-week interval and mean stroke onset-to-groin puncture time were calculated before confinement measures and after confinement measures. Distributions (non-normal) between the 2 groups (before COVID-19 confinement versus after COVID-19 confinement) were compared using 2-sample Wilcoxon rank-sum test. The results show a significant decrease in mean number of EVTs performed per hospital per 2-week interval between before COVID-19 confinement (9.0 [95% CI, 7.8-10.1]) and after COVID-19 confinement (6.1 [95% CI, 4.5-7.7]), (P<0.001). In addition, there is a significant increase in mean stroke onset-to-groin puncture time (P<0.001), between before COVID-19 confinement (300.3 minutes [95% CI, 285.3-315.4]) and after COVID-19 confinement (354.5 minutes [95% CI, 316.2-392.7]). Our preliminary analysis indicates a 32% reduction in EVT procedures and an estimated 54-minute increase in symptom onset-to-groin puncture time after confinement measures for COVID-19 pandemic were put into place.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Disease Management , Endovascular Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Quarantine , Stroke/therapy , Brain Ischemia/therapy , COVID-19 , Eligibility Determination , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Spain , Time-to-Treatment , Treatment Outcome
5.
Stroke ; 51(8): 2540-2543, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-418810

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Higher rates of strokes have been observed in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), but data regarding the outcomes of COVID-19 patients suffering from acute ischemic stroke due to large vessel occlusion (LVO) are lacking. We report our initial experience in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke with LVO in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: All consecutive patients with COVID-19 with acute ischemic stroke due to LVO treated in our institution during the 6 first weeks of the COVID-19 outbreak were included. Baseline clinical and radiological findings, treatment, and short-term outcomes are reported. RESULTS: We identified 10 patients with confirmed COVID-19 treated for an acute ischemic stroke due to LVO. Eight were men, with a median age of 59.5 years. Seven had none or mild symptoms of COVID-19 at stroke onset. Median time from COVID-19 symptoms to stroke onset was 6 days. All patients had brain imaging within 3 hours from symptoms onset. Five patients had multi-territory LVO. Five received intravenous alteplase. All patients had mechanical thrombectomy. Nine patients achieved successful recanalization (mTICI2B-3), none experienced early neurological improvement, 4 had early cerebral reocclusion, and a total of 6 patients (60%) died in the hospital. CONCLUSIONS: Best medical care including early intravenous thrombolysis, and successful and prompt recanalization achieved with mechanical thrombectomy, resulted in poor outcomes in patients with COVID-19. Although our results require further confirmation, a different pharmacological approach (antiplatelet or other) should be investigated to take in account inflammatory and coagulation disorders associated with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Arterial Occlusive Diseases/complications , Brain Ischemia/etiology , Brain Ischemia/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Stroke/etiology , Stroke/therapy , Aged , Arterial Occlusive Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , Brain/diagnostic imaging , Brain Ischemia/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19 , Cerebral Arteries , Cerebral Veins , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Plasminogen Activators/therapeutic use , Stroke/diagnostic imaging , Thrombectomy , Thrombolytic Therapy , Time-to-Treatment , Tissue Plasminogen Activator/therapeutic use , Treatment Outcome
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