Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 53
Filter
1.
J Interpers Violence ; 37(13-14): NP12284-NP12309, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2002030

ABSTRACT

The objectives of this study were to correlate several factors - including depression, anxiety, stress and self-esteem levels in both men and women - with the occurrence of domestic violence against women (VAW) during quarantine. This cross-sectional study was carried out in April 2020, in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic when lockdown procedures were implemented; 86 married couples participated in this study amounting to 172 responses in total. A different questionnaire was set for women and men; the couple filled out their respective questionnaire simultaneously, but privately where one did not see the answers of the other. Inclusion criteria included married couples of all ages that are living together during the lockdown of COVID-19. The results of this study showed that a higher total abuse score was found in 39 females (45.3%; CI: 0.34 - 0.56). Being a Muslim female (Beta =24.80) and females having higher anxiety (Beta=0.97) were significantly associated with higher total abuse scores, whereas higher stress score in female (Beta=-0.61) was significantly associated with lower total abuse scores. In conclusion, this study focuses on VAW as a serious problem while demonstrating its further emergence during quarantine. This study also focused on the effects brought on by lockdown policies, including social and economic factors, and their implications in the increase of VAW during this pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Quarantine
2.
PLoS One ; 16(6): e0253398, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1278193

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The increase in violence against health professionals in the COVID-19 pandemic makes it necessary to identify the predictors of violence, in order to prevent these events from happening. OBJECTIVE: Evaluating the prevalence and analyzing the variables involved in the occurrence of violence against health professionals during the COVID-19 pandemic in Brazil. METHOD: This is a cross-sectional study conducted online involving Brazilian health professionals during the COVID-19 pandemic. The data were collected through a structured questionnaire (Google Online Form) sent to health professionals on social networks and analyzed through logistic regression by using sociodemographic variables. The set of grouped variables was assigned to the final model when p <0.05. A network was built using the Mixed Graph Models (MGM) approach. A centrality measurement chart was constructed to determine which nodes have the greatest influence, strength and connectivity between the nodes around them. RESULTS: The predictors of violence in the adjusted regression model were the following: being a nursing technician / assistant; having been working for less than 20 years; working for over 37 hours a week; having suffered violence before the pandemic; having been contaminated with COVID-19; working in direct contact with patients infected by the virus; and having family members who have suffered violence. The network created with professionals who suffered violence demonstrated that the aggressions occurred mainly in the workplace, with an indication of psycho-verbal violence. In cases in which the aggressors were close people, aggressions were non-verbal and happened both in public and private places. The assaults practiced by strangers occurred in public places. CONCLUSIONS: Violence against health professionals occurs implicitly and explicitly, with consequences that can affect both their psychosocial well-being and the assistance given to their patients and families.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workplace Violence/statistics & numerical data , Workplace/psychology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Prevalence , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Workplace Violence/prevention & control , Young Adult
3.
Health Educ Behav ; 48(3): 371-375, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269854

ABSTRACT

Anti-Asian racism and violence dramatically increased during the COVID-19 pandemic. As a result, recent studies and reports are showing that the health and well-being of Asian Americans are negatively affected. To address this urgent problem, the field of health education and public health must be equipped with the critical frameworks and concepts to analyze racism and White supremacy and how it affects the health and well-being of Asian Americans. We argue that using an ethnic studies lens in health education can help educators, researchers, and practitioners teach and train health educators to address racism experienced by Asian Americans during COVID-19 in relation to their health. We will discuss the elements of ethnic studies and demonstrate how to use it as a lens in understanding health disparities in the Asian American population influenced and exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Asian Americans/education , COVID-19/ethnology , Cultural Competency , Health Education/organization & administration , Racism/psychology , Health Education/standards , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Determinants of Health/ethnology , United States
4.
Bull World Health Organ ; 99(6): 429-438, 2021 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1256316

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence and exacerbating factors of violence against women and children in Germany during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. METHODS: We conducted a representative online survey with partnered women (18-65 years) between 22 April and 8 May 2020, when participants had been under lockdown for a month. We determined the prevalence of several forms of violence within the previous month using both direct elicitation and a list experiment. We conducted a multivariable logistic regression to assess the impact of pandemic-associated risk factors. FINDINGS: Of our 3818 survey respondents, 118 (3.09%; 95% confidence interval, CI: 2.54 to 3.64) reported incidents of physical conflict, 293 (7.67%; 95% CI: 6.83 to 8.52) reported emotional abuse, and 97 (6.58%; 95% CI: 5.31 to 7.85) of 1474 respondents with children reported child corporal punishment. We estimated that 3.57% (95% CI: -0.33 to 7.46) had non-consensual intercourse with their partner. Our regression analysis revealed an increased risk of physical conflict with home quarantine (odds ratio, OR: 2.38; 95% CI: 1.56 to 3.61), financial worries (OR: 1.60; 95% CI: 0.98 to 2.61), poor mental health (OR: 3.41; 95% CI: 2.12 to 5.50) and young (< 10 years) children (OR: 2.48; 95% CI: 1.32 to 4.64); we obtained similar results for other forms of violence. Awareness and use of pertinent support services was low. CONCLUSION: Our findings of an increased risk of domestic violence during the pandemic should prompt policy-makers to improve the safety of women and children. Interventions to alleviate risks factors and extend support services are required.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Child Abuse/statistics & numerical data , Intimate Partner Violence/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Child , Child, Preschool , Communication , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Infant , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prevalence , Quarantine , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Socioeconomic Factors , Young Adult
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(10)2021 05 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1234721

ABSTRACT

Background: There has been an alarming increase in discrimination and violence towards Asians during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic amid reports that the virus was first detected in China. In an incident involving a COVID-19-related physical assault, this study examined whether economic hardship experienced by participants during the pandemic and the race of the victim (Chinese, White) would influence support to compensate a victim and punish the assailant. The study also explored whether the perception that the victim experienced emotional and physical suffering due to the assault would mediate the relationships. Method: Participants in India and the United States reported on their own economic hardship due to the pandemic. They then read about an incident in which an innocent person suffered a COVID-19-related physical and verbal attack, and indicated if they would support punishing the assailant and financially compensating the victim. Results: When the victim was Chinese, participants experiencing a high degree of COVID-19 economic hardship were less likely to support financially compensating the victim or punishing the assailant compared to when the victim was White. Furthermore, when the victim was Chinese, the negative associations between economic hardship and financially compensating the victim and punishing the assailant were mediated by reduced recognition that the victim suffered emotional trauma and pain as a result of the attack. Conclusions: COVID-19-driven economic hardship experienced by participants predicted an array of reactions that reflected reduced recognition of the civil and human rights of a victim of a COVID-19-related assault. These findings have significant implications for mental health, public health, and the justice system, and underscore the pressing need for prompt action to mitigate economic hardship and to address racism and discrimination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Humans , India/epidemiology , Punishment , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
6.
Ann Glob Health ; 87(1): 41, 2021 04 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1225915

ABSTRACT

Background: Healthcare workers (HCWs) across the globe have met tremendous challenges during the COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) pandemic, such as shortages of personal protective equipment, extensive work hours, and constant fear of catching the virus or transmitting it to loved ones. Adding on to the already existing burnout, an increase in incidents of violence and aggression against HCWs was seen in Pakistan and globally. Objectives: Primarily to review cases of violence against HCWs in Pakistan, highlighting and comparing the instigating factors seen within the country and globally. Secondly, to enlist possible interventions to counter workplace violence in healthcare during a pandemic and in general. Methods: Incidents of violence towards HCWs in Pakistan during the COVID-19 pandemic occurring between April 7, 2020, and August 7, 2020, were included. The incidents reported from local newspapers were reviewed. Findings and Conclusion: A total of 29 incidents were identified, with perpetrators of violence most commonly being relatives of COVID-19 patients. Most frequent reasons included mistrust in HCWs, belief in conspiracy theories, hospitals' refusal to admit COVID-19 patients due to limited space, COVID-19 hospital policies, and the death of the COVID-19 patients. Protests by doctors and other HCWs for provision of adequate PPE, better quarantine conditions for doctors with suspected COVID-19, and better compensation for doctors on COVID-19 patient duty resulted in police violence towards HCWs. To avoid such incidents in the future, institutions, healthcare policymakers, media organisations, and law enforcement agencies must work together for widespread public awareness to counter misconceptions and to exhibit responsible journalism. In hospitals, measures such as de-escalation training and increased security must be implemented. Furthermore, law enforcement agencies must be trained in non-violent methods of crowd dispersal and control to manage peaceful protests by HCWs over legitimate issues.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel , Workplace Violence/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Pakistan/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Child Abuse Negl ; 116(Pt 2): 105078, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1208610

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has become a worldwide pandemic impacting child protection services (CPSs) in many countries. With quarantine and social distancing restrictions, school closures, and recreational venues suspended or providing reduced access, the social safety net for violence prevention has been disrupted significantly. Impacts include the concerns of underreporting and increased risk of child abuse and neglect, as well as challenges in operating CPSs and keeping their workforce safe. OBJECTIVE: The current discussion paper explored the impact of COVID-19 on child maltreatment reports and CPS responses by comparing countries using available population data. METHOD: Information was gathered from researchers in eight countries, including contextual information about the country's demographics and economic situation, key elements of the CPS, and the CPS response to COVID-19. Where available, information about other factors affecting children was also collected. These data informed a discussion about between-country similarities and differences. RESULTS: COVID-19 had significant impact on the operation of every CPS, whether in high- income or low-income countries. Most systems encountered some degree of service disruption or change. Risk factors for children appeared to increase while there were often substantial deficits in CPS responses, and in most countries there was at a temporary decrease in CM reports despite the increased risks to children. CONCLUSIONS: The initial data presented and discussed among the international teams pointed to the way COVID-19 has hampered CPS responses and the protection of children more generally in most jurisdictions, highlighting that children appear to have been at greater risk for maltreatment during COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child Abuse , Child Protective Services , Adult , Australia , Brazil , COVID-19/psychology , Canada , Child , Child Abuse/prevention & control , Child Abuse/statistics & numerical data , Child Protective Services/statistics & numerical data , Colombia , Female , Germany , Humans , Income , Israel , Male , Poverty , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , South Africa
9.
EClinicalMedicine ; 34: 100817, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1176661
10.
J Fam Violence ; 37(6): 927-937, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1173957

ABSTRACT

This study elucidates the responses of shelters and their adaptations to the COVID-19 pandemic, and the effects on their services to victims of violence, as well as how shelter managers assess the situation for victims, including changes in the rates and character of the violence observed by the shelters. A web-based survey was distributed twice to all Norwegian shelters (N = 46): first during the lockdown in spring 2020 and second during the relaxation of infection control measures in summer 2020. The shelters in Norway remained open during the COVID-19 pandemic. The majority saw a reduction in the number of requests during the lockdown, while the rates returned to normal when the strictest infection control measures were lifted. They expressed concern about the decline in requests during the lockdown as well as the well-being of some groups, such as victims from ethnic minority backgrounds, children, and victims with additional challenges. A majority of the shelters did not report changes in the content of the requests. Nevertheless, a third of them had observed instances of the virus and/or infection control measures being used by perpetrators as part of the violence and coercive control strategies. The shelters in Norway, as an integrated part of the welfare state, in general seem to have met the needs of their clients during the pandemic. Yet, the study revealed important inequalities and deficiencies in access to services for some groups, and in the general support and recognition by authorities of the shelters.

11.
BMJ Open ; 11(4): e045872, 2021 04 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1172760

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study aims to explore the strategies that governments and civil society organisations implemented to prevent and respond to the anticipated rise in violence against women and/or children (VAWC) during the 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. DESIGN: A scoping review and content analysis of online media reports. SETTING: WHO European region. METHODS: A scoping review of media reports and publications and a search of other grey literature (published from 1 January to 17 September 2020). Primary and secondary outcome measures included measures implemented by governments, public services and non-governmental and civil organisations to prevent or respond to VAWC during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: Our study found that in 52 of the 53 member states there was at least one measure undertaken to prevent or respond to VAWC during the pandemic. Government-led or government-sponsored measures were the most common, reported in 50 member states. Non-governmental and other civil society-led prevention and response measures were reported in 40 member states. The most common measure was the use of media and social media to raise awareness of VAWC and to provide VAWC services through online platforms, followed by measures taken to expand and/or maintain helpline services for those exposed to violence. CONCLUSION: The potential increase in VAWC during COVID-19-imposed restrictions and lockdowns resulted in adaptations and/or increases in prevention and response strategies in nearly all member states. The strength of existing public health systems influenced the requirement and choice of strategies and highlights the need for sustaining and improving violence prevention and response services. Innovative strategies employed in several member states may offer opportunities for countries to strengthen prevention and responses in the near future and during similar emergencies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Domestic Violence/prevention & control , Mass Media , Pandemics , Child , Communicable Disease Control , Europe , Female , Humans , Internet , World Health Organization
12.
J Family Med Prim Care ; 10(2): 1066-1067, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1154636
13.
Health Care Women Int ; 42(3): 335-350, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1152978

ABSTRACT

In this study, researchers aimed to assess the situation of domestic violence against women during the pandemic. 332 women participated in the study. It was found that emotional, verbal and total violence scores of the literate ones were higher. The emotional violence scores of the women who do not work and whose partners do not work due to the pandemic are higher (p < 0.05). The researchers reached the conclusion that emotional violence is higher during the pandemic process, and that failing to work in an income-generating job triggers this situation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Domestic Violence/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Socioeconomic Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Turkey/epidemiology
14.
J Clin Nurs ; 30(13-14): 2036-2047, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1148079

ABSTRACT

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to determine the relationship between nurses' exposure to violence and their professional commitment during the COVID-19 pandemic. BACKGROUND: Violence against nurses is a common problem that persists worldwide. DESIGN: This was a descriptive cross-sectional study. METHODS: An online questionnaire form and the Nursing Professional Commitment Scale were used to collect the data. The study was carried out online during the COVID-19 pandemic between October-December 2020. A total of 263 nurses agreed to participate in the study. The STROBE checklist was followed for observational studies. RESULTS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, 8.4% of the nurses stated that they were exposed to physical violence, 57.8% to verbal violence, 0.8% to sexual violence and 61.6% to mobbing. 52.1% of the nurses stated that they thought of quitting the profession during the COVID-19 pandemic. The mean total Nursing Professional Commitment Scale score was 71.33 ± 15.05. CONCLUSIONS: This study revealed that nurses' exposure to physical, verbal and sexual violence during the COVID-19 pandemic decreased compared to before the pandemic. Nurses' exposure to mobbing during the pandemic was found to increase. A statistically significant difference was found between the status of the nurses' exposure to physical violence, verbal violence, and mobbing, working hours, number of patients given care, and their thoughts of quitting the profession. It was found that the status of exposure to physical violence, thinking of quitting the profession and working hours decreased professional commitment. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: In the light of these results, it is recommended that measures to prevent violence should be addressed in a multifaceted way. In managing the pandemic process, the decisions and practices should not be left to the managers' initiative to prevent mobbing. Initiatives that will increase nurses' professional commitment during the pandemic process should be planned and implemented.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Exposure to Violence , Nurses , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
Asian J Criminol ; 16(1): 19-35, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1135187

ABSTRACT

Domestic violence, a prevalent problem in India, saw an increase during the lockdown imposed to contain the spread of COVID-19. This article explores the factors associated with an increase in domestic violence incidents during COVID-19 by applying routine activity theory (RAT) framework. Data were drawn from the incidents of domestic violence reported in newspapers. Data was analyzed using content analysis and three major themes, i.e., three principle components of RAT-motivated offender, suitable target, and absence of capable guardian-were drawn. Findings reveal that sources of motivation in domestic violence perpetrators during the lockdown were alcohol and unemployment. The symbolic value that perpetrators associated with women, lower inertia, visibility, and accessibility to the perpetrators made women suitable targets of domestic violence. Lastly, shortage of police force and travel restrictions on formal and informal sources resulted in the absence of capable guardians. We conclude that changes in the routine activities of people during the COVID-19 lockdown provided more opportunities to the perpetrators of domestic violence.

16.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; : 1-8, 2021 Mar 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1114662

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There has been a reported increase in cases of domestic violence during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic; however, systematic research data are still unavailable. This study was conducted to find out domestic violence prevalence and coping strategies among married adults during lockdown due to COVID-19 in India. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted among married men and women in the month of April 2020. Data regarding socio-demographic profile, domestic violence, and coping strategies used during lockdown were collected thorough Google Forms. A total of 97.9% of the forms were completely filled by the respondents. A descriptive analysis was done. RESULTS: Of 94 study participants, approximately 7.4% (n = 7) had faced domestic violence during lockdown. Of these 7 participants, approximately 85.7% (n = 6) reported increased frequency of domestic violence during lockdown. Approximately half of the victims chose to ignore it (57.1%; n = 4) or used yoga/meditation (42.9%; n = 3) to cope. CONCLUSIONS: With approximately 7.4% study participants facing domestic violence during lockdown, it is necessary to study its detailed epidemiology in pandemics so that interventions like helpline numbers, screening of patients during tele-consultation, etc., which can be delivered even during lockdown with the help of health-care and frontline workers could be devised to address this problem.

17.
J Interpers Violence ; 37(13-14): NP11811-NP11835, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1105638

ABSTRACT

There is increasing concern about the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and the lockdown's social and economic consequences on gender-based violence. This study aimed to assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on gender-based violence by comparing the prevalence of spousal violence against women before and during the COVID-19 related lockdown periods. This study was conducted in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq using a self-administered online questionnaire survey after the COVID-19 lockdown period in June 2020. Data were collected from a sample of 346 married women about the occurrence, frequency, and forms of spousal violence before and during the lockdown period. Significant increases in violence were observed from the pre-lockdown period to the lockdown period for any violence (32.1% to 38.7%, p = .001), emotional abuse (29.5% to 35.0%, p = .005), and physical violence (12.7% to 17.6%, p = .002). Regarding emotional abuse, humiliation (24.6% to 28.3%, p = .041) and scaring or intimidation (14.2% to 21.4%, p < .001) significantly increased during the lockdown. For physical violence, twisting the arm or pulling hair (9.0% to 13.0%, p = .004) and hitting (5.2% to 9.2%, p = .003) significantly increased during the lockdown. Forcing to have sexual intercourse also significantly increased during lockdown (6.6% to 9.5%., p = .021). The concerned authorities and women's rights organizations should collaborate to enhance the prevention of violence against women. An effective prevention strategy should emphasize recognizing and acknowledging the extent of the problem, raising awareness about the problem and the available resources to address it, and ensuring social and economic stability. Lessons learned about the increased prevalence of spousal violence against women during the COVID-19 pandemic and the need to adopt appropriate strategies to prevent and address it will be valuable for similar future crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Spouse Abuse , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Humans , Iraq , Pandemics/prevention & control , Prevalence , Spouse Abuse/psychology
18.
AIMS Public Health ; 8(1): 32-35, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1082163

ABSTRACT

Gender-based violence (GBV) or violence against women and girls (VAWG), is a global pandemic that affects 1 in 3 women in their lifetime and VAWG is one of the most prevalent human rights violations in the world. The high level of investment going into the COVID-19 recovery plan is a unique opportunity to reshape our patriarchal society, to coordinate across sectors and institutions and to take measures to reduce gender inequalities. Relief efforts to combat the pandemic should take the needs of the vulnerable population, particularly women and girls afflicted by GBV into consideration, as their needs were mostly ignored in the recovery plan of Ebola. GBV is linked to dominance, power and abuse of authority or because any calamity, be it a pandemic, conflict or a disaster. This will further exacerbate pre-existing gendered structural inequalities and power hierarchies as protective mechanisms fail leaves women and girls more vulnerable, fueling impunity for the perpetrators. There is a need for international and domestic violence prevention policies to not only focus on narrowly defined economic or political 'empowerment' because that is insufficient when it comes to challenging existing gender inequalities. Incorporating an individual's religious beliefs and community of faith (mosque, church, temple or synagogue) can offer a support system for an individual and her/his family amid a public health crisis. There is a need to engage men and boys by tailoring messages to challenge gender stereotypes and unequal gender roles to overcome patriarchy.

19.
Soc Work Health Care ; 60(1): 106-116, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1069153

ABSTRACT

The issue of dating and sexual violence (DSV) on college campuses has received increased attention nationwide as a criminal justice and public health issue. College and university employed social workers play a critical role in preventing and responding to campus DSV through direct clinical services to students as well as prevention through educational programming and training. COVID-19 has negative implications for DSV student victims, as well as service delivery and accessibility. This paper examines the innovative methods used by university employed social work clinicians and educators to meet evolving mental health care needs and continue violence prevention services during COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Intimate Partner Violence/psychology , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Sex Offenses/psychology , Social Work/organization & administration , Universities/organization & administration , Counseling/organization & administration , Health Education/organization & administration , Humans , Intimate Partner Violence/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Offenses/prevention & control , Telemedicine/organization & administration
20.
BMC Med ; 19(1): 20, 2021 02 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067229

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is little information on care-seeking patterns for sexual assault and domestic violence during the COVID-19 pandemic. The objective of this study was to examine the changes in emergency department (ED) admissions for sexual assault and domestic violence since the COVID-19 pandemic was declared. METHODS: Observational ED admissions data from The Ottawa Hospital were analyzed from March 4 to May 5 (62 days) in 2020 (COVID-19 period) and compared to the same period in 2018 (pre-COVID-19). Total and mean weekly admissions were calculated for all-cause ED admissions and for sexual and domestic violence cases. A Poisson regression (without offset term) was used to calculate the weekly case count ratio and 95% confidence intervals (CI) between the two time periods. Case characteristics were compared using chi-square tests, and percent differences were calculated. RESULTS: Compared to pre-COVID-19, total ED admissions dropped by 1111.22 cases per week (32.9% reduction), and the Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence Program cases dropped 4.66 cases per week. The weekly case count ratio for sexual assault cases was 0.47 (95% CI 0.79-0.27), equivalent of 53.49% reduction in cases, and 0.52 (95% CI 0.93-0.29), equivalent to a 48.45% reduction in physical assault cases. The characteristics of presenting cases were similar by age (median 25 years), sex (88.57% female), assault type (57.14% sexual assault, 48.57% physical assault), and location (31.43% patient's home, 40.00% assailant's home). There was a significant increase in psychological abuse (11.69% vs 28.57%) and assaults occurring outdoors (5.19% vs 22.86%). CONCLUSION: This study found a decrease in ED admissions for sexual assault and domestic violence during COVID-19, despite societal conditions that elevate risk of violence. Trends in care-seeking and assault patterns will require ongoing monitoring to inform the provision of optimal support for individuals experiencing violence, particularly as countries begin to re-open or lock-down again.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Domestic Violence/trends , Emergency Service, Hospital/trends , Pandemics , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Sex Offenses/trends , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , Communicable Disease Control/trends , Domestic Violence/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Ontario/epidemiology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , Sex Offenses/psychology , Young Adult
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL