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1.
J Infect Dis ; 224(3): 415-419, 2021 08 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526165

ABSTRACT

Mutagenic ribonucleosides can act as broad-based antiviral agents. They are metabolized to the active ribonucleoside triphosphate form and concentrate in genomes of RNA viruses during viral replication. ß-d-N4-hydroxycytidine (NHC, initial metabolite of molnupiravir) is >100-fold more active than ribavirin or favipiravir against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), with antiviral activity correlated to the level of mutagenesis in virion RNA. However, NHC also displays host mutational activity in an animal cell culture assay, consistent with RNA and DNA precursors sharing a common intermediate of a ribonucleoside diphosphate. These results indicate highly active mutagenic ribonucleosides may hold risk for the host.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Cytidine/analogs & derivatives , Mutagens/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Animals , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , CHO Cells/drug effects , Cells, Cultured , Cricetulus , Cytidine/adverse effects , Cytidine/pharmacology , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Mutagenesis/drug effects , Mutagens/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Virus Replication/drug effects
2.
Mol Cell ; 80(6): 1092-1103.e4, 2020 12 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1386332

ABSTRACT

The nucleocapsid (N) protein of coronaviruses serves two major functions: compaction of the RNA genome in the virion and regulation of viral gene transcription. It is not clear how the N protein mediates such distinct functions. The N protein contains two RNA-binding domains surrounded by regions of intrinsic disorder. Phosphorylation of the central disordered region promotes the protein's transcriptional function, but the underlying mechanism is not known. Here, we show that the N protein of SARS-CoV-2, together with viral RNA, forms biomolecular condensates. Unmodified N protein forms partially ordered gel-like condensates and discrete 15-nm particles based on multivalent RNA-protein and protein-protein interactions. Phosphorylation reduces these interactions, generating a more liquid-like droplet. We propose that distinct oligomeric states support the two functions of the N protein: unmodified protein forms a structured oligomer that is suited for nucleocapsid assembly, and phosphorylated protein forms a liquid-like compartment for viral genome processing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/chemistry , Protein Multimerization , RNA, Viral/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/genetics , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/metabolism , Humans , Phosphoproteins/chemistry , Phosphoproteins/genetics , Phosphoproteins/metabolism , Phosphorylation , Protein Domains , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism
3.
Clin Dermatol ; 38(6): 750-756, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1385291

ABSTRACT

Pemphigus and its variants, viz., vulgaris, foliaceous, vegetans, Ig A pemphigus, paraneoplastic pemphigus and Senear-Usher syndrome are rare autoimmune blistering diseases of the skin and/or mucous membranes. The autoantibodies involved in the pathogenesis of pemphigus against desmoglein result in the breach of the skin and mucosal barrier, which acts as the first line of defence against pathogens. In this paper we underscore the importance of the integumentary system as a shield against the acquisition as well as transmission of SARS-CoV-2 virion. We have also made an attempt to delineate the various treatment modalities available and the viral-drug dynamics involved in choosing the optimum therapeutic modality.


Subject(s)
Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , COVID-19/transmission , Pemphigus/drug therapy , Virus Shedding , Administration, Oral , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/adverse effects , COVID-19/complications , Feces/virology , Humans , Intestinal Mucosa/drug effects , Intestinal Mucosa/virology , Mouth Mucosa/virology , Pemphigus/complications , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Virus Shedding/drug effects
4.
Biomolecules ; 11(5)2021 05 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389275

ABSTRACT

Several RNA viruses, including SARS-CoV-2, can infect or use the eye as an entry portal to cause ocular or systemic diseases. Povidone-Iodine (PVP-I) is routinely used during ocular surgeries and eye banking as a cost-effective disinfectant due to its broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, including against viruses. However, whether PVP-I can exert antiviral activities in virus-infected cells remains elusive. In this study, using Zika (ZIKV) and Chikungunya (CHIKV) virus infection of human corneal and retinal pigment epithelial cells, we report antiviral mechanisms of PVP-I. Our data showed that PVP-I, even at the lowest concentration (0.01%), drastically reduced viral replication in corneal and retinal cells without causing cellular toxicity. Antiviral effects of PVP-I against ZIKV and CHIKV were mediated by direct viral inactivation, thus attenuating the ability of the virus to infect host cells. Moreover, one-minute PVP-I exposure of infected ocular cells drastically reduced viral replication and the production of infectious progeny virions. Furthermore, viral-induced (CHIKV) expression of inflammatory genes (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, and IL1ß) were markedly reduced in PVP-I treated corneal epithelial cells. Together, our results demonstrate potent antiviral effects of PVP-I against ZIKV and CHIKV infection of ocular cells. Thus, a low dose of PVP-I can be used during tissue harvesting for corneal transplants to prevent potential transmission of RNA viruses via infected cells.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Povidone-Iodine/pharmacology , RNA Viruses/physiology , Virus Replication/drug effects , Animals , Cell Line , Chikungunya virus/physiology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Humans , Interleukin-6/genetics , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Retinal Pigment Epithelium/cytology , Retinal Pigment Epithelium/metabolism , Retinal Pigment Epithelium/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/genetics , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/metabolism , Vero Cells , Zika Virus/physiology
5.
Virol J ; 18(1): 109, 2021 06 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388777

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The ongoing SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has spread rapidly worldwide and disease prevention is more important than ever. In the absence of a vaccine, knowledge of the transmission routes and risk areas of infection remain the most important existing tools to prevent further spread. METHODS: Here we investigated the presence of the SARS-CoV-2 virus in the hospital environment at the Uppsala University Hospital Infectious Disease ward by RT-qPCR and determined the infectivity of the detected virus in vitro on Vero E6 cells. RESULTS: SARS-CoV-2 RNA was detected in several areas, although attempts to infect Vero E6 cells with positive samples were unsuccessful. However, RNase A treatment of positive samples prior to RNA extraction did not degrade viral RNA, indicating the presence of SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsids or complete virus particles protecting the RNA as opposed to free viral RNA. CONCLUSION: Our results show that even in places where a moderate concentration (Ct values between 30 and 38) of SARS-CoV-2 RNA was found; no infectious virus could be detected. This suggests that the SARS-CoV-2 virus in the hospital environment subsides in two states; as infectious and as non-infectious. Future work should investigate the reasons for the non-infectivity of SARS-CoV-2 virions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Disease Transmission, Infectious/statistics & numerical data , Environmental Monitoring/methods , Animals , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Confined Spaces , Cross Infection/virology , Hospitals , Humans , Risk , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , Ventilation/methods , Vero Cells
6.
Virol J ; 18(1): 1, 2021 01 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388776

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Virus neutralization by antibodies is an important prognostic factor in many viral diseases. To easily and rapidly measure titers of neutralizing antibodies in serum or plasma, we developed pseudovirion particles composed of the spike glycoprotein of SARS-CoV-2 incorporated onto murine leukemia virus capsids and a modified minimal murine leukemia virus genome encoding firefly luciferase. This assay design is intended for use in laboratories with biocontainment level 2 and therefore circumvents the need for the biocontainment level 3 that would be required for replication-competent SARS-CoV-2 virus. To validate the pseudovirion assay, we set up comparisons with other available antibody tests including those from Abbott, Euroimmun and Siemens, using archived, known samples. RESULTS: 11 out of 12 SARS-CoV-2-infected patient serum samples showed neutralizing activity against SARS-CoV-2-spike pseudotyped MLV viruses, with neutralizing titers-50 (NT50) that ranged from 1:25 to 1:1,417. Five historical samples from patients hospitalized for severe influenza infection in 2016 tested negative in the neutralization assay (NT50 < 25). Three serum samples with high neutralizing activity against SARS-CoV-2/MLV pseudoviruses showed no detectable neutralizing activity (NT50 < 25) against SARS-CoV-1/MLV pseudovirions. We also compared the semiquantitative Siemens SARS-CoV-2 IgG test, which measures binding of IgG to recombinantly expressed receptor binding domain of SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein with the neutralization titers obtained in the pseudovirion assay and the results show high concordance between the two tests (R2 = 0.9344). CONCLUSIONS: SARS-CoV-2 spike/MLV pseudovirions provide a practical means of assessing neutralizing activity of antibodies in serum or plasma from infected patients under laboratory conditions consistent with biocontainment level 2. This assay offers promise also in evaluating immunogenicity of spike glycoprotein-based candidate vaccines in the near future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Leukemia/immunology , Neutralization Tests/methods , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Virion/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Mice
7.
Biophys J ; 120(6): 975-976, 2021 03 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1385176
8.
Biomol NMR Assign ; 15(1): 219-227, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384623

ABSTRACT

The nucleocapsid protein N from SARS-CoV-2 is one of the most highly expressed proteins by the virus and plays a number of important roles in the transcription and assembly of the virion within the infected host cell. It is expected to be characterized by a highly dynamic and heterogeneous structure as can be inferred by bioinformatics analyses as well as from the data available for the homologous protein from SARS-CoV. The two globular domains of the protein (NTD and CTD) have been investigated while no high-resolution information is available yet for the flexible regions of the protein. We focus here on the 1-248 construct which comprises two disordered fragments (IDR1 and IDR2) in addition to the N-terminal globular domain (NTD) and report the sequence-specific assignment of the two disordered regions, a step forward towards the complete characterization of the whole protein.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/chemistry , Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Carbon Isotopes , Computational Biology , Hydrogen , Nitrogen Isotopes , Phosphoproteins/chemistry , Protein Binding , Protein Domains , Protein Structure, Secondary
9.
Int J Infect Dis ; 108: 413-418, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1351701

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate four sample treatments in a safe and straightforward procedure to detect SARS-CoV-2 in saliva. METHODS: Four sample treatments were evaluated in a 3-step procedure to detect SARS-CoV-2 in saliva: 1) heating at 95 °C for 5 min for sample inactivation; 2) sample treatment; 3) analysis by reverse-transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). Saliva samples used were from infected individuals or were spiked with known quantities of viral particles. RESULTS: Three treatments had a limit of detection (LOD) of 500.000 viral particles per ml of saliva and could be used to detect individuals with potential to transmit the disease. The treatment of phosphate buffer, dithiothreitol, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and proteinase K, with an additional 95 °C heating step, yielded a lower LOD of 95; its sensitivity ranged from 100% in patients with nasopharyngeal swab reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction cycle threshold values <20 to 47.8% for values >30. CONCLUSIONS: This report highlights the importance of an adequate sample treatment for saliva to detect SARS-CoV-2 and describes a flexible procedure that can be adapted to point-of-care. Although its sensitivity when LAMP is used is lower than reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, this procedure can contribute to COVID-19 control by detecting individuals able to transmit the disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , Molecular Diagnostic Techniques , Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques , RNA, Viral/genetics , Saliva , Sensitivity and Specificity
10.
Infect Dis Now ; 51(5): 410-417, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1349451

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 mainly infects the respiratory tract, and presents significantly higher active replication in the upper airways. To remain viable and infectious, the SARS-CoV-2 virion must be complete and integral, which is not easily demonstrated in the environment by positive reverse transcriptase PCR results. Real-life conditions in healthcare settings may be conducive to SARS-CoV-2 RNA dissemination in the environment but without evidence of its viability and infectiveness in air. Theoretically, SARS-CoV-2 shedding and dissemination nonetheless appears to be air-mediated, and a distinction between "air" and "droplet" transmission is too schematic to reflect the reality of the respiratory particles emitted by patients, between which a continuum exists. Airborne transmission is influenced by numerous environmental conditions that are not transposable between different viral agents and situations in healthcare settings or in the community. Even though international guidelines on "droplet" versus "air" precautions and personal protective equipment (surgical versus respirator masks) are under discussion, the existing literature underscores the effectiveness of "droplet" precautions as a means of protecting healthcare workers. Differentiation in guidelines between healthcare venues, community settings and, more generally, confined environments is of paramount importance, especially insofar as it underlines the abiding pandemic-related need for systematic mask wearing by the general population.


Subject(s)
Air Microbiology , COVID-19/transmission , Health Personnel , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Occupational Diseases/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans
11.
Nature ; 588(7838): 498-502, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343462

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virions are surrounded by a lipid bilayer from which spike (S) protein trimers protrude1. Heavily glycosylated S trimers bind to the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 receptor and mediate entry of virions into target cells2-6. S exhibits extensive conformational flexibility: it modulates exposure of its receptor-binding site and subsequently undergoes complete structural rearrangement to drive fusion of viral and cellular membranes2,7,8. The structures and conformations of soluble, overexpressed, purified S proteins have been studied in detail using cryo-electron microscopy2,7,9-12, but the structure and distribution of S on the virion surface remain unknown. Here we applied cryo-electron microscopy and tomography to image intact SARS-CoV-2 virions and determine the high-resolution structure, conformational flexibility and distribution of S trimers in situ on the virion surface. These results reveal the conformations of S on the virion, and provide a basis from which to understand interactions between S and neutralizing antibodies during infection or vaccination.


Subject(s)
Cryoelectron Microscopy , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/ultrastructure , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/analysis , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/ultrastructure , Virion/chemistry , Virion/ultrastructure , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Cell Line, Tumor , Humans , Models, Molecular , Pliability , Protein Conformation , Protein Multimerization , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/isolation & purification , Virion/isolation & purification , Virion/metabolism
12.
Biochimie ; 179: 237-246, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1326916

ABSTRACT

The anti-malarial drug Chloroquine (CQ) and its derivative hydroxychloroquine have shown antiviral activities in vitro against many viruses, including coronaviruses, dengue virus and the biosafety level 4 Nipah and Hendra paramyxoviruses. The in vivo efficacy of CQ in the treatment of COVID-19 is currently a matter of debate. CQ is a lysosomotrophic compound that accumulates in lysosomes, as well as in food vacuoles of Plasmodium falciparum. In the treatment of malaria, CQ impairs the digestion and growth of the parasite by increasing the pH of the food vacuole. Similarly, it is assumed that the antiviral effects of CQ results from the increase of lysosome pH and the inhibition of acidic proteases involved in the maturation of virus fusion protein. CQ has however other effects, among which phospholipidosis, characterized by the accumulation of multivesicular bodies within the cell. The increase in phospholipid species particularly concerns bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP), a specific lipid of late endosomes involved in vesicular trafficking and pH-dependent vesicle budding. It was shown previously that drugs like progesterone, the cationic amphiphile U18666A and the phospholipase inhibitor methyl arachidonyl fluoro phosphonate (MAFP) induce the accumulation of BMP in THP-1 cells and decrease cell infection by human immunodeficiency virus. HIV viral particles were found to be retained into large endosomal-type vesicles, preventing virus spreading. Since BMP was also reported to favour virus entry through hijacking of the endocytic pathway, we propose here that BMP could play a dual role in viral infection, with its antiviral effects triggered by lysosomotropic drugs like CQ.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Chloroquine/pharmacology , Endocytosis/drug effects , Endosomes/drug effects , Endosomes/metabolism , Lysophospholipids/metabolism , Monoglycerides/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
13.
Jpn J Infect Dis ; 74(4): 285-292, 2021 Jul 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1323436

ABSTRACT

Isolation of seasonal coronaviruses, which include human coronavirus (HCoV) OC43, HCoV-HKU1, and HCoV-NL63, from primary cultures is difficult because it requires experienced handling, an exception being HCoV-229E, which can be isolated using cell lines such as RD-18S and HeLa-ACE2-TMPRSS2. We aimed to isolate seasonal CoVs in Yamagata, Japan to obtain infective virions useful for further research and to accelerate fundamental studies on HCoVs and SARS-CoV-2. Using modified air-liquid interface (ALI) culture of the normal human airway epithelium from earlier studies, we isolated 29 HCoVs (80.6%: 16, 6, 6, and 1 isolates of HCoV-OC43, HCoV-HKU1, HCoV-NL63, and HCoV-229E, respectively) from 36 cryopreserved nasopharyngeal specimens. In ALI cultures of HCoV-OC43 and HCoV-NL63, the harvested medium contained more than 1 × 104 genome copies/µL at every tested time point during the more than 100 days of culture. Four isolates of HCoV-NL63 were further subcultured and successfully propagated in an LLC-MK2 cell line. Our results suggest that ALI culture is useful for isolating seasonal CoVs and sustainably obtaining HCoV-OC43 and HCoV-NL63 virions. Furthermore, the LLC-MK2 cell line in combination with ALI cultures can be used for the large-scale culturing of HCoV-NL63. Further investigations are necessary to develop methods for culturing difficult-to-culture seasonal CoVs in cell lines.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus/isolation & purification , Epithelium/virology , Respiratory System/virology , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , Coronavirus/genetics , Genome, Viral/genetics , Humans , Japan
14.
Pharmacol Res ; 158: 104850, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1318927

ABSTRACT

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has spread worldwide through person-to-person contact, causing a public health emergency of international concern. At present, there is no specific antiviral treatment recommended for SARS-CoV-2 infection. Liu Shen capsule (LS), a traditional Chinese medicine, has been proven to have a wide spectrum of pharmacological properties, such as anti-inflammatory, antiviral and immunomodulatory activities. However, little is known about the antiviral effect of LS against SARS-CoV-2. Herein, the study was designed to investigate the antiviral activity of SARS-CoV-2 and its potential effect in regulating the host's immune response. The inhibitory effect of LS against SARS-CoV-2 replication in Vero E6 cells was evaluated by using the cytopathic effect (CPE) and plaque reduction assay. The number of virions of SARS-CoV-2 was observed under transmission electron microscope after treatment with LS. Proinflammatory cytokine expression levels upon SARS-CoV-2 infection in Huh-7 cells were measured by real-time quantitative PCR assays. The results showed that LS could significantly inhibit SARS-CoV-2 replication in Vero E6 cells, and reduce the number of virus particles and it could markedly reduce pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1ß, IL-8, CCL-2/MCP-1 and CXCL-10/IP-10) production at the mRNA levels. Moreover, the expression of the key proteins in the NF-κB/MAPK signaling pathway was detected by western blot and it was found that LS could inhibit the expression of p-NF-κB p65, p-IκBα and p-p38 MAPK, while increasing the expression of IκBα. These findings indicate that LS could inhibit SARS-CoV-2 virus infection via downregulating the expression of inflammatory cytokines induced virus and regulating the activity of NF-κB/MAPK signaling pathway in vitro, making its promising candidate treatment for controlling COVID-19 disease.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Complex Mixtures/pharmacology , NF-kappa B/antagonists & inhibitors , NF-kappa B/metabolism , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/pharmacology , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19 , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Cells, Cultured , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Virion/drug effects
15.
Am J Pathol ; 191(9): 1610-1623, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1316372

ABSTRACT

Despite occasional reports of vertical transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) during pregnancy, the question of placental infection and its consequences for the newborn remain unanswered. Herein, we analyzed the placentas of 31 coronavirus disease 2019-positive mothers by reverse transcriptase PCR, immunohistochemistry, and in situ hybridization. Only one case of placental infection was detected, which was associated with intrauterine demise of the fetus. Differentiated primary trophoblasts were then isolated from nonpathologic human placentas at term, differentiated, and exposed to SARS-CoV-2 virions. Unlike for positive control cells Vero E6, the virus inside cytotrophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts or in the supernatant 4 days after infection was undetectable. As a mechanism of defense, we hypothesized that trophoblasts at term do not express angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 and transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2), the two main host membrane receptors for SARS-CoV-2 entry. The quantification of these proteins in the placenta during pregnancy confirmed the absence of TMPRSS2 at the surface of the syncytium. Surprisingly, a transiently induced experimental expression of TMPRSS2 did not allow the entry or replication of the virus in differentiated trophoblasts. Altogether, these results underline that trophoblasts are not likely to be infected by SARS-CoV-2 at term, but raise concern about preterm infection.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/biosynthesis , COVID-19 , Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic , Placenta Diseases , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Serine Endopeptidases/biosynthesis , Trophoblasts , Virus Internalization , Adult , COVID-19/enzymology , COVID-19/pathology , Female , Humans , Placenta Diseases/enzymology , Placenta Diseases/pathology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/enzymology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/pathology , Trophoblasts/enzymology , Trophoblasts/pathology
16.
Med Hypotheses ; 153: 110628, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1272625

ABSTRACT

Presently, it remains unclear why the prevalence of lung diseases, namely chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), is much lower than other medical comorbidities and the general population among patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). If COVID-19 is a respiratory disease, why is COPD not the leading risk factor for contracting COVID-19? The same odd phenomenon was also observed with other pathogenic human coronaviruses causing severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), but not other respiratory viral infections such as influenza and respiratory syncytial viruses. One commonly proposed reason for the low COPD rates among COVID-19 patients is the usage of inhaled corticosteroids or bronchodilators that may protect against COVID-19. However, another possible reason not discussed elsewhere is that lungs in a diseased state may not be conducive for the severe acute respiratory distress syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) to establish COVID-19. For one, COPD causes mucous plugging in large and small airways, which may hinder SARS-CoV-2 from reaching deeper parts of the lungs (i.e., alveoli). Thus, SARS-CoV-2 may only localize to the upper respiratory tract of persons with COPD, causing mild or asymptomatic infections requiring no hospital attention. Even if SARS-CoV-2 reaches the alveoli, cells therein are probably under a heavy burden of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and extensively damaged where it may not support efficient viral replication. As a result, limited SARS-CoV-2 virions would be produced in diseased lungs, preventing the development of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive , Humans , Lung , Prevalence , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/complications , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
17.
World J Clin Cases ; 9(17): 4381-4387, 2021 Jun 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270281

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Wuhan, China in December 2019, the overall fatality rate of severe and critical patients with COVID-19 is high and the effective therapy is limited. CASE SUMMARY: In this case report, we describe a case of the successful combination of the prone position (PP) and high-flow nasal oxygen (HFNO) therapy in a spontaneously breathing, severe COVID-19 patient who presented with fever, fatigue and hypoxemia and was diagnosed by positive throat swab COVID-19 RNA testing. The therapy significantly improved the patient's clinical symptoms, oxygenation status, and radiological characteristics of lung injury during hospitalization, and the patient showed good tolerance and avoided intubation. Additionally, we did not find that medical staff wearing optimal airborne personal protective equipment (PPE) were infected by the new coronavirus in our institution. CONCLUSION: We conclude that the combination of PP and HFNO could benefit spontaneously breathing, severe COVID-19 patients. The therapy does not increase risk of healthcare workers wearing optimal airborne PPE to become infected with virus particles.

18.
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 166(4): 615-622, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1261241

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Current epidemiologic predictions of COVID-19 suggest that SARS-CoV-2 mitigation strategies must be implemented long-term. In-office aerosol-generating procedures pose a risk to staff and patients while necessitating examination room shutdown to allow aerosol decontamination by indwelling ventilation. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge on portable high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) purifiers' effectiveness in eliminating airborne SARS-CoV-2 from indoor environments. DATA SOURCES: Medline, Embase, Cochrane Databases, and the World Health Organization's COVID-19 Global Literature on Coronavirus Disease. REVIEW METHODS: Data sources were systematically searched for original English-language published studies indexed up to January 14, 2021 per the following search strategy: ("HEPA" OR "High-efficiency" OR "High-efficiency particulate air" OR "Efficiency particulate" OR "Purifier" OR "Filter" OR "Cleaner" OR "Filtration") AND ("COVID" OR "COVID-19" OR "SARS-CoV-2" OR "Coronavirus"). Additional relevant studies were identified by searching the reference lists of included articles. RESULTS: Eleven published studies have evaluated the effectiveness of portable HEPA purifiers in eliminating airborne SARS-CoV-2 with relevantly sized surrogate particles. Ten studies evaluated aerosols and submicron particles similar in size to SARS-CoV-2 virions. In all studies, portable HEPA purifiers were able to significantly reduce airborne SARS-CoV-2-surrogate particles. The addition of portable HEPA purifiers augmented other decontamination strategies such as ventilation. CONCLUSION: Experimental studies provide evidence for portable HEPA purifiers' potential to eliminate airborne SARS-CoV-2 and augment primary decontamination strategies such as ventilation. Based on filtration rates, additional air exchanges provided by portable HEPA purifiers may be calculated and room shutdown times potentially reduced after aerosol-generating procedures.


Subject(s)
Air Filters , COVID-19 , Aerosols , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Ventilation
19.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(25)2021 06 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1258619

ABSTRACT

Quantitatively describing the time course of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection within an infected individual is important for understanding the current global pandemic and possible ways to combat it. Here we integrate the best current knowledge about the typical viral load of SARS-CoV-2 in bodily fluids and host tissues to estimate the total number and mass of SARS-CoV-2 virions in an infected person. We estimate that each infected person carries 109 to 1011 virions during peak infection, with a total mass in the range of 1 µg to 100 µg, which curiously implies that all SARS-CoV-2 virions currently circulating within human hosts have a collective mass of only 0.1 kg to 10 kg. We combine our estimates with the available literature on host immune response and viral mutation rates to demonstrate how antibodies markedly outnumber the spike proteins, and the genetic diversity of virions in an infected host covers all possible single nucleotide substitutions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Viral Load , Virion/physiology , Humans , Serologic Tests
20.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 11885, 2021 06 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1258601

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is an enveloped virus responsible for the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Here, single viruses were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) operating directly in a level 3 biosafety (BSL3) facility, which appeared as a fast and powerful method to assess at the nanoscale level and in 3D infectious virus morphology in its native conformation, or upon inactivation treatments. AFM imaging reveals structurally intact infectious and inactivated SARS-CoV-2 upon low concentration of formaldehyde treatment. This protocol combining AFM and plaque assays allows the preparation of intact inactivated SARS-CoV-2 particles for safe use of samples out of level 3 laboratory to accelerate researches against the COVID-19 pandemic. Overall, we illustrate how adapted BSL3-AFM is a remarkable toolbox for rapid and direct virus analysis based on nanoscale morphology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Microscopy, Atomic Force , SARS-CoV-2/ultrastructure , Virion/ultrastructure , Animals , Chlorocebus aethiops , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Vero Cells , Virion/physiology , Virus Inactivation
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