Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 317
Filter
1.
J Clin Med ; 9(6)2020 06 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785755

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), due to the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), has become an epidemiological threat and a worldwide concern. SARS-CoV-2 has spread to 210 countries worldwide and more than 6,500,000 confirmed cases and 384,643 deaths have been reported, while the number of both confirmed and fatal cases is continually increasing. COVID-19 is a viral disease that can affect every age group-from infants to the elderly-resulting in a wide spectrum of various clinical manifestations. COVID-19 might present different degrees of severity-from mild or even asymptomatic carriers, even to fatal cases. The most common complications include pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Fever, dry cough, muscle weakness, and chest pain are the most prevalent and typical symptoms of COVID-19. However, patients might also present atypical symptoms that can occur alone, which might indicate the possible SARS-CoV-2 infection. The aim of this paper is to review and summarize all of the findings regarding clinical manifestations of COVID-19 patients, which include respiratory, neurological, olfactory and gustatory, gastrointestinal, ophthalmic, dermatological, cardiac, and rheumatologic manifestations, as well as specific symptoms in pediatric patients.

2.
J Am Soc Nephrol ; 32(9): 2242-2254, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1702796

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) causes significan t morbidity, mainly from pulmonary involvement, extrapulmonary symptoms are also major componen ts of the disease. Kidney disease, usually presenting as AKI, is particularly severe among patients with COVID-19. It is unknown, however, whether such injury results from direct kidney infection with COVID-19's causative virus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), or from indirect mechanisms. METHODS: Using ex vivo cell models, we sought to analyze SARS-CoV-2 interactions with kidney tubular cells and assess direct tubular injury. These models comprised primary human kidney epithelial cells (derived from nephrectomies) and grown as either proliferating monolayers or quiescent three-dimensional kidney spheroids. RESULTS: We demonstrated that viral entry molecules and high baseline levels of type 1 IFN-related molecules were present in monolayers and kidney spheroids. Although both models support viral infection and replication, they did not exhibit a cytopathic effect and cell death, outcomes that were strongly present in SARS-CoV-2-infected controls (African green monkey kidney clone E6 [Vero E6] cultures). A comparison of monolayer and spheroid cultures demonstrated higher infectivity and replication of SARS-CoV-2 in actively proliferating monolayers, although the spheroid cultures exhibited high er levels of ACE2. Monolayers exhibited elevation of some tubular injury molecules-including molecules related to fibrosis (COL1A1 and STAT6) and dedifferentiation (SNAI2)-and a loss of cell identity, evident by reduction in megalin (LRP2). The three-dimensional spheroids were less prone to such injury. CONCLUSIONS: SARS-CoV-2 can infect kidney cells without a cytopathic effect. AKI-induced cellular proliferation may potentially intensify infectivity and tubular damage by SARS-CoV-2, suggesting that early intervention in AKI is warranted to help minimize kidney infection.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Acute Kidney Injury/virology , COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spheroids, Cellular/virology , Animals , Cells, Cultured , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cohort Studies , Cytopathogenic Effect, Viral , Epithelial Cells/pathology , Epithelial Cells/virology , Host Microbial Interactions , Humans , Interferon Type I/metabolism , Kidney/immunology , Kidney/pathology , Kidney/virology , Mice , Mice, Inbred NOD , Mice, SCID , Models, Biological , Pandemics , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spheroids, Cellular/pathology , Vero Cells , Virus Replication
3.
SN Compr Clin Med ; 2(9): 1430-1435, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1682606

ABSTRACT

The current outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) also known as coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has quickly progressed to a global pandemic. There are well-documented cardiac complications of COVID-19 in patients with and without prior cardiovascular disease. The cardiac complications include myocarditis, heart failure, and acute coronary syndrome resulting from coronary artery thrombosis or SARS-CoV-2-related plaque ruptures. There is growing evidence showing that arrhythmias are also one of the major complications. Myocardial inflammation caused by viral infection leads to electrophysiological and structural remodeling as a possible mechanism for arrhythmia. This could also be the mechanism through which SARS-CoV-2 leads to different arrhythmias. In this review article, we discuss arrhythmia manifestations in COVID-19.

4.
J Pediatr Hematol Oncol ; 44(1): e296-e298, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1603356

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Roseola infantum is always considered to be among the differential diagnosis of young patients with fever and leukopenia whom to be strictly isolated with the preliminary diagnosis of COVID-19 until otherwise proven during the pandemic. RESULTS: Human herpes virus-6 (HHV-6) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) blood test was performed in 4 of 7 patients with a clinical diagnosis of roseola infantum and all found to be HHV-6 PCR positive. The most striking laboratory finding in all patients was leukopenia. HHV-6 PCR tests were found to be positive. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 testing were found to be negative in all patients. CONCLUSION: During the peak of the pandemic, children continued to present with fever because of viral infections other than COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Exanthema Subitum/diagnosis , Herpesvirus 6, Human/isolation & purification , COVID-19/diagnosis , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Infant , Leukopenia/diagnosis , Male , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
5.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(2): e513-e522, 2021 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493765

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: For pediatric pneumonia, the meteorological and air pollution indicators have been frequently investigated for their association with viral circulation but not for their impact on disease severity. METHODS: We performed a 10-year prospective, observational study in 1 hospital in Chongqing, China, to recruit children with pneumonia. Eight commonly seen respiratory viruses were tested. Autoregressive distributed lag (ADL) and random forest (RF) models were used to fit monthly detection rates of each virus at the population level and to predict the possibility of severe pneumonia at the individual level, respectively. RESULTS: Between 2009 and 2018, 6611 pediatric pneumonia patients were included, and 4846 (73.3%) tested positive for at least 1 respiratory virus. The patient median age was 9 months (interquartile range, 4‒20). ADL models demonstrated a decent fitting of detection rates of R2 > 0.7 for respiratory syncytial virus, human rhinovirus, parainfluenza virus, and human metapneumovirus. Based on the RF models, the area under the curve for host-related factors alone was 0.88 (95% confidence interval [CI], .87‒.89) and 0.86 (95% CI, .85‒.88) for meteorological and air pollution indicators alone and 0.62 (95% CI, .60‒.63) for viral infections alone. The final model indicated that 9 weather and air pollution indicators were important determinants of severe pneumonia, with a relative contribution of 62.53%, which is significantly higher than respiratory viral infections (7.36%). CONCLUSIONS: Meteorological and air pollution predictors contributed more to severe pneumonia in children than did respiratory viruses. These meteorological data could help predict times when children would be at increased risk for severe pneumonia and when interventions, such as reducing outdoor activities, may be warranted.


Subject(s)
Air Pollution , Pneumonia , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human , Respiratory Tract Infections , Virus Diseases , Air Pollution/adverse effects , Air Pollution/analysis , Child , China/epidemiology , Humans , Infant , Pneumonia/epidemiology , Pneumonia/etiology , Prospective Studies , Weather
6.
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol ; 212: 105939, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1492339

ABSTRACT

7-Ketocholesterol, which is one of the earliest cholesterol oxidization products identified, is essentially formed by the auto-oxidation of cholesterol. In the body, 7-ketocholesterol is both provided by food and produced endogenously. This pro-oxidant and pro-inflammatory molecule, which can activate apoptosis and autophagy at high concentrations, is an abundant component of oxidized Low Density Lipoproteins. 7-Ketocholesterol appears to significantly contribute to the development of age-related diseases (cardiovascular diseases, age-related macular degeneration, and Alzheimer's disease), chronic inflammatory bowel diseases and to certain cancers. Recent studies have also shown that 7-ketocholesterol has anti-viral activities, including on SARS-CoV-2, which are, however, lower than those of oxysterols resulting from the oxidation of cholesterol on the side chain. Furthermore, 7-ketocholesterol is increased in the serum of moderately and severely affected COVID-19 patients. In the case of COVID-19, it can be assumed that the antiviral activity of 7-ketocholesterol could be counterbalanced by its toxic effects, including pro-oxidant, pro-inflammatory and pro-coagulant activities that might promote the induction of cell death in alveolar cells. It is therefore suggested that this oxysterol might be involved in the pathophysiology of COVID-19 by contributing to the acute respiratory distress syndrome and promoting a deleterious, even fatal outcome. Thus, 7-ketocholesterol could possibly constitute a lipid biomarker of COVID-19 outcome and counteracting its toxic effects with adjuvant therapies might have beneficial effects in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/etiology , Ketocholesterols/blood , Animals , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/drug therapy , Humans , Ketocholesterols/metabolism
7.
Front Cardiovasc Med ; 7: 598400, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485042

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus pandemic has reportedly infected over 31.5 million individuals and caused over 970,000 deaths worldwide (as of 22nd Sept 2020). This novel coronavirus, officially named severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), although primarily causes significant respiratory distress, can have significant deleterious effects on the cardiovascular system. Severe cases of the virus frequently result in respiratory distress requiring mechanical ventilation, often seen, but not confined to, individuals with pre-existing hypertension and cardiovascular disease, potentially due to the fact that the virus can enter the circulation via the lung alveoli. Here the virus can directly infect vascular tissues, via TMPRSS2 spike glycoprotein priming, thereby facilitating ACE-2-mediated viral entry. Clinical manifestations, such as vasculitis, have been detected in a number of vascular beds (e.g., lungs, heart, and kidneys), with thromboembolism being observed in patients suffering from severe coronavirus disease (COVID-19), suggesting the virus perturbs the vasculature, leading to vascular dysfunction. Activation of endothelial cells via the immune-mediated inflammatory response and viral infection of either endothelial cells or cells involved in endothelial homeostasis, are some of the multifaceted mechanisms potentially involved in the pathogenesis of vascular dysfunction within COVID-19 patients. In this review, we examine the evidence of vascular manifestations of SARS-CoV-2, the potential mechanism(s) of entry into vascular tissue and the contribution of endothelial cell dysfunction and cellular crosstalk in this vascular tropism of SARS-CoV-2. Moreover, we discuss the current evidence on hypercoagulability and how it relates to increased microvascular thromboembolic complications in COVID-19.

8.
Am J Case Rep ; 22: e932321, 2021 Jun 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1395309

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND Subacute thyroiditis, myocarditis, and hepatitis are inflammatory disorders that may develop after viral infections, including SARS-CoV-2. These entities may appear after resolution of the respiratory syndrome. CASE REPORT A previously healthy 64-year-old male patient came to the hospital reporting severe chest pain. He had a history of a COVID-19 pneumonia with PCR confirmation 4 weeks before. On admission to the Coronary Care Unit (CCU), the patient had a negative PCR for SARS-CoV-2; the following tests were performed: total T3 643.4 ng/dl (reference 35-193 ng/dl), total thyroxine 12.0 µg/dl (reference 4.8-11.7 µg/dl), free T4 1.85 ng/dl (reference 0.7-1.48 ng/dl), TSH 0.01 µIU/ml (reference 0.35-4.94 µIU/ml); total bilirubin 0.76 mg/dl (reference 0.0-1.5 mg/dl), alkaline phosphatase 185 U/L (reference 40-150 U/L), alanine aminotransferase 194.6 U/L (reference 6-66 U/L), aspartate aminotransferase 93.4 U/L (reference 9-55 U/L); on admission to the CCU high-sensitivity troponin I 548.3 pg/ml (reference 0.0-34.2 pg/ml), after 24 h in the CCU 801 pg/ml, and after 11 days (as an outpatient) 4.5 pg/ml. A thyroid gammagram revealed absent uptake of the radionuclide. Normal cardiac gammagraphy and cardiac enzymes ruled out myocardial ischemia and infarction. The following diagnoses were made: myocarditis, subacute thyroiditis, and reactive hepatitis due to SARS-CoV-2 infection. CONCLUSIONS COVID-19 has been demonstrated to be a multisystemic inflammatory disorder. The serious illness that developed in our patient after relief of his pulmonary disease underlines this nature. We suggest close follow-up of patients even after apparent clinical resolution, and performing thyroid, myocardial, and liver tests if clinically indicated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hepatitis , Myocarditis , Thyroiditis, Subacute , Biomarkers , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Myocarditis/diagnosis , Myocarditis/etiology , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Intensive Care Med ; 47(2): 188-198, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384370

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Although patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection have several risk factors for ventilator-associated lower respiratory tract infections (VA-LRTI), the reported incidence of hospital-acquired infections is low. We aimed to determine the relationship between SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia, as compared to influenza pneumonia or no viral infection, and the incidence of VA-LRTI. METHODS: Multicenter retrospective European cohort performed in 36 ICUs. All adult patients receiving invasive mechanical ventilation > 48 h were eligible if they had: SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia, influenza pneumonia, or no viral infection at ICU admission. VA-LRTI, including ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis (VAT) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), were diagnosed using clinical, radiological and quantitative microbiological criteria. All VA-LRTI were prospectively identified, and chest-X rays were analyzed by at least two physicians. Cumulative incidence of first episodes of VA-LRTI was estimated using the Kalbfleisch and Prentice method, and compared using Fine-and Gray models. RESULTS: 1576 patients were included (568 in SARS-CoV-2, 482 in influenza, and 526 in no viral infection groups). VA-LRTI incidence was significantly higher in SARS-CoV-2 patients (287, 50.5%), as compared to influenza patients (146, 30.3%, adjusted sub hazard ratio (sHR) 1.60 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.26 to 2.04)) or patients with no viral infection (133, 25.3%, adjusted sHR 1.7 (95% CI 1.2 to 2.39)). Gram-negative bacilli were responsible for a large proportion (82% to 89.7%) of VA-LRTI, mainly Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacter spp., and Klebsiella spp. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of VA-LRTI is significantly higher in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection, as compared to patients with influenza pneumonia, or no viral infection after statistical adjustment, but residual confounding may still play a role in the effect estimates.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated , Respiratory Tract Infections , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Europe , Female , Humans , Incidence , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Ventilators, Mechanical
10.
J Med Virol ; 93(9): 5350-5357, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384240

ABSTRACT

PARP14 and PARP9 play a key role in macrophage immune regulation. SARS-CoV-2 is an emerging viral disease that triggers hyper-inflammation known as a cytokine storm. In this study, using in silico tools, we hypothesize about the immunological phenomena of molecular mimicry between SARS-CoV-2 Nsp3 and the human PARP14 and PARP9. The results showed an epitope of SARS-CoV-2 Nsp3 protein that contains consensus sequences for both human PARP14 and PARP9 that are antigens for MHC Classes 1 and 2, which can potentially induce an immune response against human PARP14 and PARP9; while its depletion causes a hyper-inflammatory state in SARS-CoV-2 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/chemistry , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Neoplasm Proteins/chemistry , Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerases/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Amino Acid Sequence , Binding Sites , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Computer Simulation , Consensus Sequence , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/genetics , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/genetics , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Epitopes/chemistry , Epitopes/genetics , Epitopes/immunology , Gene Expression , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/chemistry , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/genetics , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/immunology , Histocompatibility Antigens Class II/chemistry , Histocompatibility Antigens Class II/genetics , Histocompatibility Antigens Class II/immunology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Macrophages/immunology , Macrophages/virology , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Mimicry , Neoplasm Proteins/genetics , Neoplasm Proteins/immunology , Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerases/genetics , Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerases/immunology , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , Protein Conformation, beta-Strand , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sequence Alignment , Sequence Homology, Amino Acid , Thermodynamics
11.
Front Immunol ; 11: 565521, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389164

ABSTRACT

Neurological disorders caused by neuroviral infections are an obvious pathogenic manifestation. However, non-neurotropic viruses or peripheral viral infections pose a considerable challenge as their neuropathological manifestations do not emerge because of primary infection. Their secondary or bystander pathologies develop much later, like a syndrome, during and after the recovery of patients from the primary disease. Massive inflammation caused by peripheral viral infections can trigger multiple neurological anomalies. These neurological damages may range from a general cognitive and motor dysfunction up to a wide spectrum of CNS anomalies, such as Acute Necrotizing Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy, Guillain-Barré syndrome, Encephalitis, Meningitis, anxiety, and other audio-visual disabilities. Peripheral viruses like Measles virus, Enteroviruses, Influenza viruses (HIN1 series), SARS-CoV-1, MERS-CoV, and, recently, SARS-CoV-2 are reported to cause various neurological manifestations in patients and are proven to be neuropathogenic even in cellular and animal model systems. This review presents a comprehensive picture of CNS susceptibilities toward these peripheral viral infections and explains some common underlying themes of their neuropathology in the human brain.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/immunology , Neurogenic Inflammation/complications , Neurogenic Inflammation/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , SARS Virus/immunology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/complications , Animals , Blood-Brain Barrier/immunology , Blood-Brain Barrier/virology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokines/blood , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Microglia/immunology , Microglia/virology , Neurogenic Inflammation/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/immunology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology
12.
Eur J Clin Pharmacol ; 76(11): 1615-1618, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384377

ABSTRACT

AIM: SARS-CoV-2 infection has been divided by scientific opinion into three phases: the first as asymptomatic or slightly symptomatic and the second and the third with greater severity, characterized by a hyperinflammatory and fibrotic state, responsible for lung lesions, in some cases fatal. The development of antiviral drugs directed against SARS-CoV-2 and effective vaccines is progressing; meanwhile, the best pharmacological objective is related to the management of all the complications caused by this viral infection, mainly controlling the inflammatory and fibrotic state and preventing the infection from moving into the most serious phases. SUBJECT AND METHOD: Describe the scientific rationale related to the use of an antifibrotic therapy with pirfenidone, as monotherapy and/or in combination with anti-inflammatory drugs to manage and control complications of SARS-CoV-2 infection. RESULTS: Based on the scientific literature and epidemiological results and considering the pathophysiological, biological, and molecular characteristics of SARS-CoV-2, an antifibrotic drug such as pirfenidone as monotherapy or in combination with anti-inflammatory drugs can be (acting early, at the right doses and at the right time) therapeutically effective to avoid serious complications during viral infection. The same approach can also be effective as postinfection therapy in patients with residual pulmonary fibrotic damage. Management of inflammation and fibrotic status with a combination therapy of pirfenidone and IL-6 or IL-1 inhibitors could represent a pharmacological synergy with added value. CONCLUSION: In this article, we consider the role of antifibrotic therapy with pirfenidone in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection on going or in the stage of postinfection with pulmonary fibrotic consequences. The scientific rationale for its use is also described.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pulmonary Fibrosis/drug therapy , Pulmonary Fibrosis/etiology , Pyridones/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Drug Therapy, Combination , Humans , Inflammation/drug therapy , Interleukin-1/antagonists & inhibitors , Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
13.
J Med Virol ; 2020 Jun 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1381917

ABSTRACT

Palatine tonsils have been observed to harbor several distinct respiratory and herpesviruses in separate studies. In this study, the presence of these viruses in palatine tonsils was comprehensively studied in both children and adults. A cross-sectional analysis of 181 patients (median age 22 years; range, 2.6-66) operated for a benign tonsillar disease was conducted. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect 27 distinct viruses in all: eight human herpesviruses, 16 respiratory viruses, parvo B19, and polyoma BK/JC viruses. Clinical characteristics of the patients and underlying conditions were evaluated. In total, 92% of patients had virus detected in tonsils (Epstein-Barr virus 72%, human herpesvirus 7, and 6B 54% and 16%, respectively, enterovirus 18%, parvovirus B19 7% and the rest <4%). No herpes simplex virus 2, varicella zoster virus, polyoma JC virus, parainfluenza-, metapneumo-, or coronaviruses were found. Enterovirus was more common in children and was frequently observed in the presence of HHV6B. None of the viruses showed a positive association to the tonsillar disease. Respiratory symptoms were not associated with the prevalence of viruses. This study comprehensively reports a cross-sectional view of intratonsillar virus infections in elective tonsillectomy patients in a wide age range cohort. Tonsils are a major virus reservoir for distinct herpes and respiratory viruses without a positive association with tonsillar disease or respiratory symptoms.

14.
Tuberk Toraks ; 68(4): 388-398, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1380064

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Respiratory virus infections may cause serious respiratory failure requiring intensive care unit (ICU) admission. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical features and the outcome in patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF) due to viral infections comparing etiological agents. MATERIALS AND METHODS: ARF patients with positive viral serology were retrospectively recruited. Cohort was evaluated with regard to subgroups as influenza and other respiratory viruses (ORV), as well as survivors and nonsurvivors. RESULT: Out of 938 admitted patients, 319 were followed as ARF and only 149 patients had viral respiratory panel results. In 49 patients with ARF, 52 positive viral results were detected and 47 patients with single positive viral isolates of either influenza or ORV were included. Among them, 62% had ORV with quite similar characteristics with influenza group apart from diabetes mellitus which was encountered more in influenza group (p= 0.02). Overall ICU mortality was 32% and there was no difference between the two groups (p= 0.42). Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score was independently associated with ICU mortality (OR: 1.25; 95% CI: 1.04-1.51; p= 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: This study emphasizes to consider the possibility of other respiratory viruses for the cause of ARF with similar characteristics and mortality as influenza species.


Subject(s)
Critical Illness , Influenza, Human/mortality , Patient Admission , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/mortality , APACHE , Adult , Aged , Cohort Studies , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Turkey , Young Adult
15.
Intensive Care Med Exp ; 9(1): 31, 2021 Jun 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376600

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Whether or not to administer antibiotics is a common and challenging clinical decision in patients with suspected infections presenting to the emergency department (ED). We prospectively validate InSep, a 29-mRNA blood-based host response test for the prediction of bacterial and viral infections. METHODS: The PROMPT trial is a prospective, non-interventional, multi-center clinical study that enrolled 397 adult patients presenting to the ED with signs of acute infection and at least one vital sign change. The infection status was adjudicated using chart review (including a syndromic molecular respiratory panel, procalcitonin and C-reactive protein) by three infectious disease physicians blinded to InSep results. InSep (version BVN-2) was performed using PAXgene Blood RNA processed and quantified on NanoString nCounter SPRINT. InSep results (likelihood of bacterial and viral infection) were compared to the adjudicated infection status. RESULTS: Subject mean age was 64 years, comorbidities were significant for diabetes (17.1%), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (13.6%), and severe neurological disease (6.8%); 16.9% of subjects were immunocompromised. Infections were adjudicated as bacterial (14.1%), viral (11.3%) and noninfected (0.25%): 74.1% of subjects were adjudicated as indeterminate. InSep distinguished bacterial vs. viral/noninfected patients and viral vs. bacterial/noninfected patients using consensus adjudication with AUROCs of 0.94 (95% CI 0.90-0.99) and 0.90 (95% CI 0.83-0.96), respectively. AUROCs for bacterial vs. viral/noninfected patients were 0.88 (95% CI 0.79-0.96) for PCT, 0.80 (95% CI 0.72-89) for CRP and 0.78 (95% CI 0.69-0.87) for white blood cell counts (of note, the latter biomarkers were provided as part of clinical adjudication). To enable clinical actionability, InSep incorporates score cutoffs to allocate patients into interpretation bands. The Very Likely (rule in) InSep bacterial band showed a specificity of 98% compared to 94% for the corresponding PCT band (> 0.5 µg/L); the Very Unlikely (rule-out) band showed a sensitivity of 95% for InSep compared to 86% for PCT. For the detection of viral infections, InSep demonstrated a specificity of 93% for the Very Likely band (rule in) and a sensitivity of 96% for the Very Unlikely band (rule out). CONCLUSIONS: InSep demonstrated high accuracy for predicting the presence of both bacterial and viral infections in ED patients with suspected acute infections or suspected sepsis. When translated into a rapid, point-of-care test, InSep will provide ED physicians with actionable results supporting early informed treatment decisions to improve patient outcomes while upholding antimicrobial stewardship. Registration number at Clinicaltrials.gov NCT03295825.

16.
Nature ; 591(7848): 124-130, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1368933

ABSTRACT

Although infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has pleiotropic and systemic effects in some individuals1-3, many others experience milder symptoms. Here, to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the distinction between severe and mild phenotypes in the pathology of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and its origins, we performed a whole-blood-preserving single-cell analysis protocol to integrate contributions from all major immune cell types of the blood-including neutrophils, monocytes, platelets, lymphocytes and the contents of the serum. Patients with mild COVID-19 exhibit a coordinated pattern of expression of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs)3 across every cell population, whereas these ISG-expressing cells are systemically absent in patients with severe disease. Paradoxically, individuals with severe COVID-19 produce very high titres of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies and have a lower viral load compared to individuals with mild disease. Examination of the serum from patients with severe COVID-19 shows that these patients uniquely produce antibodies that functionally block the production of the ISG-expressing cells associated with mild disease, by activating conserved signalling circuits that dampen cellular responses to interferons. Overzealous antibody responses pit the immune system against itself in many patients with COVID-19, and perhaps also in individuals with other viral infections. Our findings reveal potential targets for immunotherapies in patients with severe COVID-19 to re-engage viral defence.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Interferons/antagonists & inhibitors , Interferons/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibody Formation , Base Sequence , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Interferons/metabolism , Male , Neutrophils/immunology , Neutrophils/pathology , Protein Domains , Receptor, Interferon alpha-beta/antagonists & inhibitors , Receptor, Interferon alpha-beta/immunology , Receptor, Interferon alpha-beta/metabolism , Receptors, IgG/immunology , Single-Cell Analysis , Viral Load/immunology
17.
Curr Diabetes Rev ; 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1367728

ABSTRACT

The article has been withdrawn at the request of the authors and editor of the journal Current Diabetes Reviews, due to incoherent content.Bentham Science apologizes to the readers of the journal for any inconvenience this may have caused.The Bentham Editorial Policy on Article Withdrawal can be found at https://benthamscience.com/editorial-policies-main.php. BENTHAM SCIENCE DISCLAIMER: It is a condition of publication that manuscripts submitted to this journal have not been published and will not be simultaneously submitted or published elsewhere. Furthermore, any data, illustration, structure or table that has been published elsewhere must be reported, and copyright permission for reproduction must be obtained. Plagiarism is strictly forbidden, and by submit-ting the article for publication the authors agree that the publishers have the legal right to take appropriate action against the authors, if plagiarism or fabricated information is discovered. By submitting a manuscript, the authors agree that the copyright of their article is transferred to the publishers if and when the article is accepted for publication.

18.
Pharmacol Res ; 157: 104849, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1318926

ABSTRACT

Taking anti-inflammatory drugs, including non-steroidal (NSAIDs), during Covid-19 infection, how much is risky? The French Minister of Health, who has raised an alarm on a possible risk deriving from the use of ibuprofen for the control of fever and other symptoms during the disease, opened the debate a few days ago. In this paper we examine available evidence from preclinical and clinical studies that had analysed the role of COX in the inflammatory process and the effects of NSAIDs in patients with infections. Most of the published studies that suggested not protective effects of NSAIDs were mainly performed in vitro or on animals. Therefore, their meaning in humans is to be considered with great caution. Based also on data suggesting protective effects of NSAIDs, we concluded that currently there is no evidence suggesting a correlation between NSAIDs and a worsening of infections. Further studies will be certainly needed to better define the role of NSAIDs and particularly COX2 inhibitors in patients with infections. In the meantime, we must wait for results of the revision started by the PRAC on May 2019 on the association ibuprofen/ketoprofen​​​​​​ and worsening of infections. Since nowadays no scientific evidence establishes a correlation between NSAIDS and worsening of COVID-19, patients should be advice against any NSAIDs self-medication when COVID-19 like symptoms are present.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/adverse effects , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/adverse effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Virus Diseases/drug therapy , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Pharmaceuticals (Basel) ; 14(4)2021 Apr 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305767

ABSTRACT

To date, the leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide include viral infections, such as Ebola, influenza virus, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and recently COVID-19 disease, caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Currently, we can count on a narrow range of antiviral drugs, especially older generation ones like ribavirin and interferon which are effective against viruses in vitro but can often be ineffective in patients. In addition to these, we have antiviral agents for the treatment of herpes virus, influenza virus, HIV and hepatitis virus. Recently, drugs used in the past especially against ebolavirus, such as remdesivir and favipiravir, have been considered for the treatment of COVID-19 disease. However, even if these drugs represent important tools against viral diseases, they are certainly not sufficient to defend us from the multitude of viruses present in the environment. This represents a huge problem, especially considering the unprecedented global threat due to the advancement of COVID-19, which represents a potential risk to the health and life of millions of people. The demand, therefore, for new and effective antiviral drugs is very high. This review focuses on three fundamental points: (1) presents the main threats to human health, reviewing the most widespread viral diseases in the world, thus describing the scenario caused by the disease in question each time and evaluating the specific therapeutic remedies currently available. (2) It comprehensively describes main phytochemical classes, in particular from plant foods, with proven antiviral activities, the viruses potentially treated with the described phytochemicals. (3) Consideration of the various applications of drug delivery systems in order to improve the bioavailability of these compounds or extracts. A PRISMA flow diagram was used for the inclusion of the works. Taking into consideration the recent dramatic events caused by COVID-19 pandemic, the cry of alarm that denounces critical need for new antiviral drugs is extremely strong. For these reasons, a continuous systematic exploration of plant foods and their phytochemicals is necessary for the development of new antiviral agents capable of saving lives and improving their well-being.

20.
Clin Dermatol ; 39(1): 56-63, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1300691

ABSTRACT

Autoimmune connective tissue diseases are a heterogeneous group of clinical entities sharing a common feature-an impairment of structural components like collagen and elastin, arising by autoimmune mechanisms. Because most patients are on a long-term immunosuppressive therapy, which renders them vulnerable to infections, a new challenge appears in front of physicians in the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) era. Immune mechanisms are substantial for the control and ceasing of viral infections, and their impairment may cause serious complications; however, data from immunosuppressed transplant patients do not reveal a higher frequency or diseases' severity in those infected by COVID-19. Several immunotherapies used to treat autoimmune connective tissue diseases favorably modulate the immune response of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2)-infected patients. The present review highlights the problems of susceptibility, severity, and therapeutic options in patients with autoimmune connective tissue diseases during the COVID-19 pandemic. The relationship between autoimmune connective tissue diseases and COVID-19 infection is explained with antiviral protection genes expression, hypercytokinemia, and lymphohistiocytosis/macrophage activation mechanisms. Recommendations concerning therapy for prevention during the pandemic period or in case of concomitant COVID-19 infection are also presented. Clinical trials are ongoing regarding COVID-19 therapy blocking the cytokine response. © 2021 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Dermatomyositis , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic , Scleroderma, Systemic , Vasculitis , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Antimalarials/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatomyositis/complications , Dermatomyositis/drug therapy , Dermatomyositis/immunology , Disease Susceptibility , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Janus Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/complications , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/drug therapy , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/immunology , Patient Acuity , SARS-CoV-2 , Scleroderma, Systemic/drug therapy , Scleroderma, Systemic/immunology , Thromboembolism/etiology , Vasculitis/drug therapy
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL