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1.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0248675, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574573

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In December 2019, a new disease named coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was occurred. Patients who are critically ill with COVID-19 are more likely to die, especially elderly patients. We aimed to describe the effect of age on the clinical and immune characteristics of critically ill patients with COVID-19. METHODS: We retrospectively included 32 patients with COVID-19 who were confirmed to have COVID-19 by the local health authority and who were admitted to the first affiliated hospital of Zhengzhou University in Zhengzhou, China between January 3 and March 20, 2020. Clinical information and experimental test data were retrospectively collected for the patients. The 32 patients in this study were all in a critical condition and were classified as severe, according to the guidelines of 2019-nCoV infection from the National Health Commission of the People's Republic of China. Data were compared between those <60 years old and ≥60 years old. RESULTS: Of 32 patients, 13 were under 60 years old, and 19 patients were ≥60 years old. The most common symptom among all patients upon admission was fever (93.8%, 30/32). Compared to younger patients, older patients exhibited increased comorbidities. Among patients who were 60 years and older, platelet count, direct bilirubin (DBIL), indirect bilirubin(IBIL), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), C-reactive protein (CRP), procalcitonin (PCT), and interleukin-10 (IL-10) were significantly higher than in younger patients who were less than 60 years old. CD4+ T lymphocytes, CD8+ T lymphocytes, and NKT lymphocytes were decreased, CD4+/CD8+ T lymphocytes were significantly increased in all 32 patients, while there were no evident differences between younger and older patients. The CURB-65 (confusion, urea, respiratory, rate, blood pressure plus age ≥65 years), Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II and pH value were significantly higher in older patients than in patients who were under 60 years old. However, the PaO2 and PaO2:FiO2 were lower in older patients than the younger. Compared to patients under 60 years old, patients who were 60 years and older tended to develop ARDS (15 [78.9%] vs 5 [38.5%]), septic shock (7 [36.8%] vs 0 [0.0%]) and were more likely to receive mechanical ventilation (13 [68.4%] vs 3[23.1%]). Dynamic trajectories of seven laboratory parameters were tracked on days 1, 3, 5 and 7, and significant differences in lymphocyte count (P = 0.026), D-dimer (P = 0.010), lactate dehydrogenase (P = 0.000) and C-reactive protein (P = 0.000) were observed between the two age groups. CONCLUSIONS: A high proportion of critically ill patients were 60 or older. Furthermore, rapid disease progression was noted in elderly patients. Therefore, close monitoring and timely treatment should be performed in elderly COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Age Factors , Aged , CD4-CD8 Ratio , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , Critical Illness , Female , Humans , Immunity , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Preliminary Data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index
2.
Int J Clin Pract ; 75(9): e14462, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1494712

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Studies have shown that some cytokines in COVID-19 patients were elevated. This study aims to assess whether IL-10, IL-1ß, IL-6, MCP-1, TNF-α, IP-10 and IL-4 serve as potential diagnostic biomarkers of COVID-19. METHODS: The above serum cytokines in COVID-19 patients and non-COVID-19 patients were detected by ELISA and SARS-CoV-2 IgM and IgG were detected by the chemiluminescence method. The independent-sample Mann-Whitney U test was utilised to compare cytokine levels in different groups and courses, the Levene T-test and T'-test were utilised to compare they in different genders and the Spearman correlation test was utilised to analyse the correlation between the cytokine levels with ages and SARS-CoV-2 IgG and IgM. RESULTS: Serum levels of IL-10, IL-1ß, MCP-1, TNF-α and IL-4 in COVID-19 patients were significantly higher than those in non-COVID-19 patients, while IL-6 were only significantly higher than in healthy people, IP-10 were significantly lower than in other diseases patients. AUCs of COVID-19 diagnosed by IL-10, IL-1ß, IL-6, MCP-1, TNF-α, IP-10 and IL-4 were 0.735, 0.775, 0.595, 0.821, 0.848, 0.38 and 0.682, respectively. In the COVID-19 patients' serum, the levels of IL-10 and MCP-1 of male were noticeably higher than those of female, and all cytokines were significantly positively correlated with age, IL-1ß and IL-4 were significantly negatively correlated with SARS-CoV-2 IgM, while IL-10, IL-1ß, IL-6, TNF- and IP-10 were significantly negatively correlated with SARS-CoV-2 IgG. IL-10 on 43-56 days was significantly lower than at 29-42 days, TNF-α at 15-42 days was significantly higher than at 0-14 days, IP-10 at 0-14 days was the highest and IL-4 at 29-42 days was significantly higher than at 0-14 days. CONCLUSIONS: The detection of IL-10, IL-1 ß, IL-6, MCP-1, TNF-α and IL-4 would assist the clinical study of COVID-19, and IP-10 may be the cytokine of early elevation in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha , Chemokine CXCL10 , Cytokines , Female , Humans , Interleukin-10 , Interleukin-1beta , Interleukin-4 , Interleukin-6 , Male , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Engineering (Beijing) ; 7(7): 958-965, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1482579

ABSTRACT

The longitudinal immunologic status of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-infected patients and its association with the clinical outcome are barely known. Thus, we sought to analyze the temporal profiles of specific antibodies, as well as the associations between the antibodies, proinflammatory cytokines, and survival of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). A total of 1830 laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 cases were recruited. The temporal profiles of the virus, antibodies, and cytokines of the patients until 12 weeks since illness onset were fitted by the locally weighted scatter plot smoothing method. The mediation effect of cytokines on the associations between antibody responses and survival were explored by mediation analysis. Of the 1830 patients, 1435 were detectable for SARS-CoV-2, while 395 were positive in specific antibodies only. Of the 1435 patients, 2.4% presented seroconversion for neither immunoglobulin G (IgG) nor immunoglobulin M (IgM) during hospitalization. The seropositive rates of IgG and IgM were 29.6% and 48.1%, respectively, in the first week, and plateaued within five weeks. For the patients discharged from the hospital, the IgM decreased slowly, while high levels of IgG were maintained at around 188 AU·mL-1 for the 12 weeks since illness onset. In contrast, in the patients who subsequently died, IgM declined rapidly and IgG dropped to 87 AU·mL-1 at the twelfth week. Elevated interleukin-6, interleukin-8, interleukin-10, interleukin-1ß, interleukin-2R, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels were observed in the deceased patients in comparison with the discharged patients, and 12.5% of the association between IgG level and mortality risk was mediated by these cytokines. Our study deciphers the temporal profiles of SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies within the 12 weeks since illness onset and indicates the protective effect of antibody response on survival, which may help to guide prognosis estimation.

4.
Cells ; 10(4)2021 04 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456314

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Intra-articular fractures are a major cause of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). Despite adequate surgical treatment, the long-term risk for PTOA is high. Previous studies reported that joint injuries initiate an inflammatory cascade characterized by an elevation of synovial pro-inflammatory cytokines, which can lead to cartilage degradation and PTOA development. This review summarizes the literature on the post-injury regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the markers of cartilage destruction in patients suffering from intra-articular fractures. Methods: We searched Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases (1960-February 2020) and included studies that were performed on human participants, and we included control groups. Two investigators assessed the quality of the included studies using Covidence and the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Results: Based on the surveyed literature, several synovial pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukins (IL)-1ß, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12p70, interferon-y, and tumor necrosis factor-α, were significantly elevated in patients suffering from intra-articular fractures compared to the control groups. A simultaneous elevation of anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10 and IL-1RA was also observed. In contrast, IL-13, CTX-II, and aggrecan concentrations did not differ significantly between the compared cohorts. Conclusions: Overall, intra-articular fractures are associated with an increase in inflammation-related synovial cytokines. However, more standardized studies which focus on the ratio of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines at different time points are needed.


Subject(s)
Cytokines/metabolism , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Intra-Articular Fractures/metabolism , Case-Control Studies , Humans , Joints/pathology , Synovial Fluid/metabolism
5.
J Hepatol ; 75(3): 647-658, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1228069

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: COVID-19 is associated with liver injury and elevated interleukin-6 (IL-6). We hypothesized that IL-6 trans-signaling in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) leads to endotheliopathy (a proinflammatory and procoagulant state) and liver injury in COVID-19. METHODS: Coagulopathy, endotheliopathy, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were retrospectively analyzed in a subset (n = 68), followed by a larger cohort (n = 3,780) of patients with COVID-19. Liver histology from 43 patients with COVID-19 was analyzed for endotheliopathy and its relationship to liver injury. Primary human LSECs were used to establish the IL-6 trans-signaling mechanism. RESULTS: Factor VIII, fibrinogen, D-dimer, von Willebrand factor (vWF) activity/antigen (biomarkers of coagulopathy/endotheliopathy) were significantly elevated in patients with COVID-19 and liver injury (elevated ALT). IL-6 positively correlated with vWF antigen (p = 0.02), factor VIII activity (p = 0.02), and D-dimer (p <0.0001). On liver histology, patients with COVID-19 and elevated ALT had significantly increased vWF and platelet staining, supporting a link between liver injury, coagulopathy, and endotheliopathy. Intralobular neutrophils positively correlated with platelet (p <0.0001) and vWF (p <0.01) staining, and IL-6 levels positively correlated with vWF staining (p <0.01). IL-6 trans-signaling leads to increased expression of procoagulant (factor VIII, vWF) and proinflammatory factors, increased cell surface vWF (p <0.01), and increased platelet attachment in LSECs. These effects were blocked by soluble glycoprotein 130 (IL-6 trans-signaling inhibitor), the JAK inhibitor ruxolitinib, and STAT1/3 small-interfering RNA knockdown. Hepatocyte fibrinogen expression was increased by the supernatant of LSECs subjected to IL-6 trans-signaling. CONCLUSION: IL-6 trans-signaling drives the coagulopathy and hepatic endotheliopathy associated with COVID-19 and could be a possible mechanism behind liver injury in these patients. LAY SUMMARY: Patients with SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) infection often have liver injury, but why this occurs remains unknown. High levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and its circulating receptor, which form a complex to induce inflammatory signals, have been observed in patients with COVID-19. This paper demonstrates that the IL-6 signaling complex causes harmful changes to liver sinusoidal endothelial cells and may promote blood clotting and contribute to liver injury.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Endothelial Cells/pathology , Interleukin-6/physiology , Liver Diseases/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , Fibrinogen/analysis , Humans , Interleukin-6/blood , Janus Kinase 1/metabolism , Nitriles , Pyrazoles/pharmacology , Pyrimidines , Retrospective Studies , STAT3 Transcription Factor/metabolism , Signal Transduction/physiology , von Willebrand Factor/analysis
6.
J Med Virol ; 93(4): 2090-2098, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1227749

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Many laboratory parameters have been associated with morbidity and mortality in SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19), which emerged in an animal market in Wuhan, China in December 2019 and has infected over 20 million people. This study investigated the relationship between serum interleukin (IL)-18, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), and alpha defensin levels and the clinical course and prognosis of COVID-19. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study included 100 patients who were admitted to the chest diseases department and intensive care unit of our hospital and diagnosed with COVID-19 by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of nasopharyngeal swab samples between March 24 and May 31, 2020. The control group consisted of 50 nonsymptomatic health workers with negative real-time PCR results in routine COVID-19 screening in our hospital. RESULTS: Serum alpha defensin, IL-1Ra, and IL-18 levels were significantly higher in patients who developed macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) compared to patients who did not (p < .001 for all). Alpha defensin, IL-1Ra, and IL-18 levels were significantly higher in COVID-19 patients with and without MAS or ARDS when compared to the control group (p < .001 for all). When the 9 patients who died were compared with the 91 surviving patients, IL-1Ra and IL-18 levels were found to be significantly higher in the nonsurvivors (p < .001). CONCLUSION: Our findings of correlations between alpha defensin and levels of IL-1Ra and IL-18, which were previously shown to be useful in COVID-19 treatment and follow-up, indicates that it may also be promising in treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/blood , Interleukin-18/blood , Macrophage Activation Syndrome/virology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , alpha-Defensins/blood , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Turkey
7.
Phytomedicine ; 87: 153583, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1213465

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A key clinical feature of COVID-19 is a deep inflammatory state known as "cytokine storm" and characterized by high expression of several cytokines, chemokines and growth factors, including IL-6 and IL-8. A direct consequence of this inflammatory state in the lungs is the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS), frequently observed in severe COVID-19 patients. The "cytokine storm" is associated with severe forms of COVID-19 and poor prognosis for COVID-19 patients. Sulforaphane (SFN), one of the main components of Brassica oleraceae L. (Brassicaceae or Cruciferae), is known to possess anti-inflammatory effects in tissues from several organs, among which joints, kidneys and lungs. PURPOSE: The objective of the present study was to determine whether SFN is able to inhibit IL-6 and IL-8, two key molecules involved in the COVID-19 "cytokine storm". METHODS: The effects of SFN were studied in vitro on bronchial epithelial IB3-1 cells exposed to the SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein (S-protein). The anti-inflammatory activity of SFN on IL-6 and IL-8 expression has been evaluated by RT-qPCR and Bio-Plex analysis. RESULTS: In our study SFN inhibits, in cultured IB3-1 bronchial cells, the gene expression of IL-6 and IL-8 induced by the S-protein of SARS-CoV-2. This represents the proof-of-principle that SFN may modulate the release of some key proteins of the COVID-19 "cytokine storm". CONCLUSION: The control of the cytokine storm is one of the major issues in the management of COVID-19 patients. Our study suggests that SFN can be employed in protocols useful to control hyperinflammatory state associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Bronchi/virology , Interleukin-6/genetics , Interleukin-8/genetics , Isothiocyanates/pharmacology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/toxicity , Sulfoxides/pharmacology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/pharmacology , Apoptosis/drug effects , Bronchi/cytology , Bronchi/drug effects , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cell Line , Chemokines/genetics , Chemokines/metabolism , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/metabolism , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Up-Regulation/drug effects
8.
Int Immunopharmacol ; 97: 107685, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1188659

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The 2019 Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic poses a huge threat internationally; however, the role of the host immune system in the pathogenesis of COVID-19 is not well understood. METHODS: Cytokine and chemokine levels and characterisation of immune cell subsets from 20 COVID-19 cases after hospital admission (17 critically ill and 3 severe patients) and 16 convalescent patients were determined using a multiplex immunoassay and flow cytometry, respectively. RESULTS: IP-10, MCP-1, MIG, IL-6, and IL-10 levels were significantly higher in acute severe/critically ill patients with COVID-19, whereas were normal in patients who had reached convalescence. CD8 T cells in severe and critically ill COVID-19 patients expressed high levels of cytotoxic granules (granzyme B and perforin)and was hyperactivated as evidenced by the high proportions of CD38. Furthermore, the cytotoxic potential of natural killer (NK) cells, and the frequencies of myeloid dendritic cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells was reduced in patients with severe and critical COVID-19; however, these dysregulations were found to be restored in convalescent phases. CONCLUSION: Thus, elicitation of the hyperactive cytokine-mediated inflammatory response, dysregulation of CD8 T and NK cells, and deficiency of host myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs, may contribute to COVID-19 pathogenesis and provide insights into potential therapeutic targets and strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Convalescence , Inflammation/etiology , ADP-ribosyl Cyclase 1/blood , Acute Disease , Adult , Aged , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/enzymology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Chemokine CCL2/blood , Chemokine CXCL10/blood , Chemokine CXCL9/blood , Critical Illness , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Dendritic Cells/immunology , Female , Granzymes/metabolism , Humans , Interleukin-10/blood , Interleukin-6/blood , Killer Cells, Natural/enzymology , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Male , Membrane Glycoproteins/blood , Middle Aged , Perforin/metabolism
9.
J Transl Med ; 19(1): 139, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1166916

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Low T3 syndrome is frequent in patients admitted to intensive care units for critical illness and pneumonia. It has been reported also in patients with COVID-19, Hodgkin disease and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. We analyzed the clinical relevance of Low T3 syndrome in COVID-19 patients and, in particular, in those with associated hematological malignancies. METHODS: Sixty-two consecutive patients, hospitalized during the first wave of SARS-CoV-2 outbreak in Sant'Andrea University Hospital in Rome, were subdivided in 38 patients (Group A), showing low levels of FT3, and in 24 patients (Group B), with normal FT3 serum values. During the acute phase of the disease, we measured serum, radiologic and clinical disease severity markers and scores, in search of possible correlations with FT3 serum values. In addition, in 6 COVID-19 patients, 4 with Low T3 syndrome, including 2 with a hematological malignancy, and 2 with normal FT3 values, we performed, high-dimensional single-cell analysis by mass cytometry, multiplex cytokine assay and gene expression profiling in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). RESULTS: Low FT3 serum values were correlated with increased Absolute Neutrophil Count, NLR and dNLR ratios and with reduced total count of CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Low FT3 values correlated also with increased levels of inflammation, tissue damage and coagulation serum markers as well as with SOFA, LIPI and TSS scores. The CyTOF analysis demonstrated reduction of the effector memory and terminal effector subtypes of the CD4+ T lymphocytes. Multiplex cytokine assay indicates that mainly IL-6, IP-10 and MCAF changes are associated with FT3 serum levels, particularly in patients with coexistent hematological malignancies. Gene expression analysis using Nanostring identified four genes differently expressed involved in host immune response, namely CD38, CD79B, IFIT3 and NLRP3. CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrates that low FT3 serum levels are associated with severe COVID-19. Our multi-omics approach suggests that T3 is involved in the immune response in COVID-19 and coexistent hematological malignancy and new possible T3 target genes in these patients have been identified.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Euthyroid Sick Syndromes/complications , Hematologic Neoplasms , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Hematologic Neoplasms/complications , Hematologic Neoplasms/genetics , Humans , Italy , Leukocytes, Mononuclear , Male , Middle Aged , Single-Cell Analysis , Triiodothyronine/blood
10.
Iran J Immunol ; 18(1): 54-64, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1160833

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), is recognized for the first time in Wuhan, China. The cytokine storm is a known factor causing major clinical symptoms leading to death in COVID-19 patients. OBJECTIVE: To investigate and compare the serum levels of different cytokines in COVID-19 patients with different clinical severity. METHODS: Concentrations of serum cytokines, including IL-1ß, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, TNF-α, IFN-γ, and GM-CSF, were measured in 61 COVID-19 patients and 31 normal controls with ELISA. We investigated the correlation between the levels of these cytokines and clinical severity, CRP level, neutrophil and lymphocyte count in patients with COVID-19. RESULTS: Our data indicated that the levels of IL-1ß, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, IFN-γ, and GM-CSF, but not IL-10 were significantly increased in COVID-19 patients compared to normal controls. Statistical analysis showed that the level of IL-1ß, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, IFN-γ, and GM-CSF were higher in severe COVID-19 than those of mild cases. The concentrations of all mentioned cytokines were negatively associated with the absolute count of lymphocytes, and positively correlated with the CRP level and the absolute count of neutrophils. CONCLUSION: The current study suggests that high levels of various cytokines correlate with the disease severity and immunopathogenesis of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokines/blood , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/diagnosis , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Female , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Iran , Lymphocytes/immunology , Lymphocytes/metabolism , Lymphocytes/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophils/immunology , Neutrophils/metabolism , Neutrophils/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index
11.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 15(3): 795-801, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1157246

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM: COVID-19 infection predisposes to diabetic ketoacidosis(DKA); whether glucocorticoids enhances this risk is unknown.We aimed to study the occurrence of DKA after initiating glucocorticoids in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus(T2DM) and moderate-to-severe COVID-19, and identify predictors for it. METHODS: Patients with T2DM and moderate or severe COVID-19 infection were prospectively observed for development of new-onset DKA for one week following initiation of parenteral dexamethasone. Clinical and biochemical parameters were compared between those who developed DKA (Group A) and those who didnot (Group B). Logistic regression was done to identify independent risk-factors predicting DKA; ROC-curve analysis to determine cut-offs for the parameters in predicting DKA. RESULTS: Amongst 302 patients screened, n = 196 were finally included, of whom 13.2% (n = 26,Group A) developed DKA. Patients in Group A were younger, had lower BMI, increased severity of COVID-19 infection, higher HbA1c%, CRP, IL-6, D-dimer and procalcitonin at admission (pall < 0.02). Further, admission BMI (OR: 0.43, CI: 0.27-0.69), HbA1c % (OR: 1.68, CI: 1.16-2.43) and serum IL-6 (OR: 1.02, CI: 1.01-1.03) emerged as independent predictors for DKA. Out of these, IL-6 levels had the highest AUROC (0.93, CI: 0.89-0.98) with a cut-off of 50.95 pg/ml yielding a sensitivity of 88% and specificity of 85.2% in predicting DKA. CONCLUSION: There is significant incidence of new-onset DKA following parenteral glucocorticoids in T2DM patients with COVID-19, especially in those with BMI <25.56 kg/m2, HbA1c% >8.35% and IL-6 levels >50.95 pg/ml at admission.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetic Ketoacidosis/diagnosis , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/drug therapy , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Diabetic Ketoacidosis/drug therapy , Diabetic Ketoacidosis/epidemiology , Diabetic Ketoacidosis/etiology , Female , Humans , Incidence , India/epidemiology , Infusions, Parenteral , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index
12.
J Immunol ; 206(7): 1597-1608, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1082059

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is associated with immune dysregulation and cytokine storm. Exploring the immune-inflammatory characteristics of COVID-19 patients is essential to reveal pathogenesis and predict progression. In this study, COVID-19 patients showed decreased CD3+, CD4+, and CD8+ T cells but increased neutrophils in circulation, exhibiting upregulated neutrophil-to-lymphocyte and neutrophil-to-CD8+ T cell ratio. IL-6, TNF-α, IL-1ß, IL-18, IL-12/IL-23p40, IL-10, Tim-3, IL-8, neutrophil extracellular trap-related proteinase 3, and S100A8/A9 were elevated, whereas IFN-γ and C-type lectin domain family 9 member A (clec9A) were decreased in COVID-19 patients compared with healthy controls. When compared with influenza patients, the expressions of TNF-α, IL-18, IL-12/IL-23p40, IL-8, S100A8/A9 and Tim-3 were significantly increased in critical COVID-19 patients, and carcinoembryonic Ag, IL-8, and S100A8/A9 could serve as clinically available hematologic indexes for identifying COVID-19 from influenza. Moreover, IL-6, IL-8, IL-1ß, TNF-α, proteinase 3, and S100A8/A9 were increased in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of severe/critical patients compared with moderate patients, despite decreased CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, B cells, and NK cells. Interestingly, bronchoalveolar IL-6, carcinoembryonic Ag, IL-8, S100A8/A9, and proteinase 3 were found to be predictive of COVID-19 severity and may serve as potential biomarkers for predicting COVID-19 progression and potential targets in therapeutic intervention of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Inflammation Mediators , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Aged , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Calgranulin A/blood , Calgranulin A/immunology , Calgranulin B/blood , Calgranulin B/immunology , Cytokines/blood , Cytokines/immunology , Disease Progression , Female , Hepatitis A Virus Cellular Receptor 2/blood , Hepatitis A Virus Cellular Receptor 2/immunology , Humans , Inflammation Mediators/blood , Inflammation Mediators/immunology , Leukocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Myeloblastin/blood , Myeloblastin/immunology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism
13.
Front Immunol ; 11: 603389, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1069720

ABSTRACT

The catastrophic outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is currently a public emergency. Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is an autoinflammatory disease characterized by life-threatening complications. Systemic hyperinflammation and cytokine storm play a critical role in the pathogenesis of both COVID-19 and AOSD. We aimed to compare the similarities and differences focusing on ferritin and cytokine levels between severe COVID-19 and active AOSD. A literature search was performed using the databases PubMed, EMBASE, and Web of Science to collect the levels of cytokine including IL-1ß, IL-6, IL-18, TNF-α, IL-10, and ferritin in severe COVID-19 patients. After extracting available data of indicators of interest, we acquired these statistics with a single-arm meta-analysis. Furthermore, a comparison was conducted between 52 patients with active AOSD in our center and severe COVID-19 patients from databases. The levels of IL-6 and IL-10 were higher in severe COVID-19 compared with those in active AOSD. There were no significant differences on the cytokine of IL-1ß and TNF-α. Fold changes of IL-18 were defined as the mean expression level ratio of severe COVID-19 to healthy controls in the COVID-19 study and active AOSD to healthy controls in our study, individually. Although the fold change of IL-18 in patients with AOSD was significantly higher than patients with severe COVID-19 (fold change: 594.00 vs 2.17), there was no statistical comparability. In addition, the level of ferritin was higher in active AOSD in comparison with severe COVID-19. Our findings suggest that severe COVID-19 and active AOSD have differences in cytokine panel and ferritin level, indicating the pathogenic role of ferritin in overwhelming inflammation. And it paves the way to make efficacy therapeutic strategy targeting the hyperinflammatory process in COVID-19 according to AOSD management, especially in severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Inflammation/immunology , Still's Disease, Adult-Onset/immunology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/epidemiology , Cytokines/blood , Female , Ferritins/blood , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Still's Disease, Adult-Onset/epidemiology
14.
Cytokine ; 140: 155439, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1032441

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Immunodeficiency has pivotal role in the pathogenesis of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Several studies have indicated defects in the immune system of COVID-19 patients at different disease stages. Therefore, this study investigated whether alters in immune responses of COVID-19 patients may be considered as predicting factors for disease outcome. METHODS: The percentages of innate and adoptive immune cells in the recovered and dead patients with COVID-19, and healthy subjects were determined by flow cytometry. The levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and other immune factors were also measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: At the first day of hospitalization, the frequencies of CD56dim CD16+ NK cells and CD56bright CD16dim/- NK cells in patients who died during treatment were significantly increased compared to recovered and healthy individuals (P < 0.0001). The recovered and dead patients had a significant increase in monocyte number in comparison with healthy subjects (P < 0.05). No significant change was observed in Th1 cell numbers between the recovered and dead patients while Th2, Th17 cell, and Treg percentages in death cases were significantly lower than healthy control and those recovered, unlike exhausted CD4 + and CD8 + T cells and activated CD4 + T cells (P < 0.0001-0.05). The activated CD8 + T cell was significantly higher in the recovered patients than healthy individuals (P < 0.0001-0.05). IL-1α, IL-1ß, IL-6, and TNF-α levels in patients were significantly increased (P < 0.0001-0.01). However, there were no differences in TNF-α and IL-1ß levels between dead and recovered patients. Unlike TGF-ß1 level, IL-10 was significantly increased in recovered patients (P < 0.05). Lymphocyte numbers in recovered patients were significantly increased compared to dead patients, unlike ESR value (P < 0.001-0.01). CRP value in recovered patients significantly differed from dead patients (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Changes in frequencies of some immune cells and levels of some immune factors may be considered as predictors of mortality in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cytokines/immunology , Immune System/immunology , Immunity/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Survivors/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Cytokines/blood , Female , Humans , Immune System/cytology , Male , Middle Aged , Monocytes/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Survival Rate , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , T-Lymphocytes, Helper-Inducer/classification , T-Lymphocytes, Helper-Inducer/immunology , T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/immunology
15.
Dermatol Ther ; 33(5): e13687, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1006125

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is responsible for at least 2 546 527 cases and 175 812 deaths as of April 21, 2020. Psoriasis and atopic dermatitis (AD) are common, chronic, inflammatory skin conditions, with immune dysregulation as a shared mechanism; therefore, mainstays of treatment include systemic immunomodulating therapies. It is unknown whether these therapies are associated with increased COVID-19 susceptibility or worse outcomes in infected patients. In this review, we discuss overall infection risks of nonbiologic and biologic systemic medications for psoriasis and AD and provide therapeutic recommendations. In summary, in patients with active infection, systemic conventional medications, the Janus kinase inhibitor tofacitinib, and biologics for psoriasis should be temporarily held until there is more data; in uninfected patients switching to safer alternatives should be considered. Interleukin (IL)-17, IL-12/23, and IL-23 inhibitors are associated with low infection risk, with IL-17 and IL-23 favored over IL-12/23 inhibitors. Pivotal trials and postmarketing data also suggest that IL-17 and IL-23 blockers are safer than tumor necrosis factor alpha blockers. Apremilast, acitretin, and dupilumab have favorable safety data and may be safely initiated and continued in uninfected patients. Without definitive COVID-19 data, these recommendations may be useful in guiding treatment of psoriasis and AD patients during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatitis, Atopic/drug therapy , Psoriasis/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , Immunologic Factors/adverse effects , Interleukin-17/antagonists & inhibitors , Interleukin-23/antagonists & inhibitors , Janus Kinase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/antagonists & inhibitors
16.
BMJ Open ; 10(11): e039951, 2020 11 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-944946

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: About 25% of patients with COVID-19 develop acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) associated with a high release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6). The aim of the SARICOR study is to demonstrate that early administration of sarilumab (an IL-6 receptor inhibitor) in hospitalised patients with COVID-19, pulmonary infiltrates and a high IL-6 or D-dimer serum level could reduce the progression of ARDS requiring high-flow nasal oxygen or mechanical ventilation (non-invasive or invasive). METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Phase II, open-label, randomised, multicentre, controlled clinical trial to study the efficacy and safety of the administration of two doses of sarilumab (200 and 400 mg) plus best available therapy (BAT) in hospitalised adults with COVID-19 presenting cytokine release syndrome. This strategy will be compared with a BAT control group. The efficacy and safety will be monitored up to 28 days postadministration. A total of 120 patients will be recruited (40 patients in each arm). ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The clinical trial has been approved by the Research Ethics Committee of the coordinating centre and authorised by the Spanish Agency of Medicines and Medical Products. If the hypothesis is verified, the dissemination of the results could change clinical practice by increasing early administration of sarilumab in adult patients with COVID-19 presenting cytokine release syndrome, thus reducing intensive care unit admissions. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT04357860.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Humans , Interleukin-6/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
17.
J Diabetes Complications ; 35(2): 107809, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-943309

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been declared a global pandemic. COVID-19 is more severe in people with diabetes. The identification of risk factors for predicting disease severity in COVID-19 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is urgently needed. METHODS: Two hundred and thirty-six patients with COVID-19 were enrolled in our study. The patients were divided into 2 groups: COVID-19 patients with or without T2DM. The patients were further divided into four subgroups according to the severity of COVID-19 as follows: Subgroup A included moderate COVID-19 patients without diabetes, subgroup B included severe COVID-19 patients without diabetes, subgroup C included moderate COVID-19 patients with diabetes, and subgroup D included severe COVID-19 patients with diabetes. The clinical features and radiological assessments were collected and analyzed. We tracked the dynamic changes in laboratory parameters and clinical outcomes during the hospitalization period. Multivariate analysis was performed using logistic regression to analyze the risk factors that predict the severity of COVID-19 with T2DM. RESULTS: Firstly, compared with the nondiabetic group, the COVID-19 with T2DM group had a higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and procalcitonin (PCT) but lower lymphocyte counts and T lymphocyte subsets, including CD3+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, CD4+ T cells, CD16 + CD56 cells, and CD19+ cells. Secondly, compared with group A, group C had higher levels of Fasting blood glucose (FBG), IL-6, TNF-α, and neutrophils but lower lymphocyte, CD3+ T cell, CD8+ T cell, and CD4+ T cell counts. Similarly, group D had higher FBG, IL-6 and TNF-α levels and lower lymphocyte, CD3+ T cell, CD8+ T cell, and CD4+ T cell counts than group B. Thirdly, binary logistic regression analysis showed that HbA1c, IL-6, and lymphocyte count were risk factors for the severity of COVID-19 with T2DM. Importantly, COVID-19 patients with T2DM were more likely to worsen from moderate to severe COVID-19 than nondiabetic patients. Of note, lymphopenia and inflammatory responses remained more severe throughout hospitalization for COVID-19 patients with T2DM. CONCLUSION: Our data suggested that COVID-19 patients with T2DM are more likely to develop severe COVID-19 than those without T2DM and that hyperglycemia associated with the lymphopenia and inflammatory responses in COVID-19 patients with T2DM.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Hyperglycemia/complications , Lymphopenia/complications , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , China , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/mortality , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Hyperglycemia/mortality , Logistic Models , Lymphopenia/mortality , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index
18.
Vasc Health Risk Manag ; 16: 455-462, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-940131

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) emerged from the West District of Southern China Seafood Wholesale Market in late December 2019 and has been declared a global pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO). Infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) presents with upper respiratory symptoms like cough, fever, and lethargy. At the same time, in later stages, critical COVID-19 patients develop acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), venous thromboembolism (VTE), and multiple organ failure from cytokine storm and coagulation hyperactivity. Primary manifestations of thrombotic events include deep vein thrombosis (DVT), disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and pulmonary embolism (PE). Initial coagulopathy in COVID-19 patients presents with elevated fibrin degradation products, especially D-dimers. In contrast, late presentations show evidence of prolonged prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin (aPTT), increased platelets, and fibrinogen levels. Diagnosis and monitoring of disease progression are done by regular screening of laboratory parameters, including D-dimer and fibrinogen. Management of coagulopathy in COVID-19 patients is like that of critically ill patients, including thromboprophylaxis. Coagulopathy is a poor prognostic factor, and optimum strategies should be developed for early diagnosis, prevention, and prompt treatment of VTE in COVID-19 patients. Thrombosis prophylaxis with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) has shown beneficial results in preventing coagulopathy a reducing risk of mortality due to thrombotic events. We will discuss VTE in COVID-19 patients highlighting the role of D-dimer, fibrinogen, and interleukin-6 (IL-6).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Fibrinogen/metabolism , Inflammation Mediators/blood , Interleukin-6/blood , Venous Thromboembolism/blood , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight/therapeutic use , Humans , Incidence , Prevalence , Prognosis , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Venous Thromboembolism/diagnosis , Venous Thromboembolism/mortality , Venous Thromboembolism/prevention & control
19.
Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis ; 99(4): 115272, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-938872

ABSTRACT

Tocilizumab, an interleukin-6 receptor antagonist, has been used to treat critically ill patients with coronavirus disease-2019. We present the case of a previously immunocompetent man with coronavirus disease-2019 who developed invasive pulmonary aspergillosis after treatment with tocilizumab, illustrating the importance of considering opportunistic infections when providing immune modulating therapy.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis/diagnosis , Aged , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Aspergillus/isolation & purification , Humans , Immunomodulation , Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis/drug therapy , Male , Micafungin/therapeutic use , Opportunistic Infections/chemically induced , Receptors, Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Voriconazole/therapeutic use
20.
J Med Virol ; 92(11): 2600-2606, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-935122

ABSTRACT

To investigate the inflammatory factors and lymphocyte subsets which play an important role in the course of severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). A total of 27 patients with severe COVID-19 who were admitted to Tongji Hospital in Wuhan from 1 to 21 February 2020 were recruited to the study. The characteristics of interleukin-1ß (IL-1ß), IL-2 receptor (IL-2R), IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF)-α, C-reactive protein (CRP), serum ferritin and procalcitonin (PCT), and lymphocyte subsets of these patients were retrospectively compared before and after treatment. Before treatment, there was no significant difference in most inflammatory factors (IL-1ß, IL-2R, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, CRP, and serum ferritin) between male and female patients. Levels of IL-2R, IL-6, TNF-α, and CRP decreased significantly after treatment, followed by IL-8, IL-10, and PCT. Serum ferritin was increased in all patients before treatment but did not decrease significantly after treatment. IL-1ß was normal in most patients before treatment. Lymphopenia was common among these patients with severe COVID-19. Analysis of lymphocyte subsets showed that CD4+ and particularly CD8+ T lymphocytes increased significantly after treatment. However, B lymphocytes and natural killer cells showed no significant changes after treatment. A pro-inflammatory response and decreased level of T lymphocytes were associated with severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Inflammation/immunology , Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , China , Cytokines/blood , Cytokines/immunology , Female , Humans , Interleukins/blood , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index
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