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1.
Health Policy ; 125(7): 833-840, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1213246

ABSTRACT

Hungary, like many countries, features a complex mix of the public and private sector in the financing and provision of health care services. At the same time, the health system also faces challenges related to shortages of health professionals, low public financing, and informal payments. With the added pressure from the COVID-19 pandemic, Hungarian policymakers acted rapidly to pass a sweeping regulation aimed at these issues. Over two days, the Hungarian parliament introduced and unanimously approved a new regulation, Act C of 2020 on the Employment Status of Health Workers, that replaces the existing public employment relationship between health professionals, public providers and their controlling authorities. The Act, passed on 6 October 2020, brings the employment of health workers under strict central control by introducing a new employment status similar to that of the armed forces. The Act also provides doctors with an unprecedented 120% salary increase and criminalizes informal payments. The reception has been overwhelmingly negative, with thousands of health professionals indicating that they would not sign the new contracts, and the policy also contains serious technical and feasibility concerns. Although the first statistics show that only about 3-5% of the active workforce did not sign the contract by 1 March 2021, the implementation of the reform still faces serious challenges.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Employment , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Workforce , Private Sector , Humans , Hungary , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
2.
J Genet Couns ; 30(6): 1658-1670, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1210246

ABSTRACT

Telehealth is a growing field, its pertinence magnified by COVID-19 causing the accelerated digitalization of the world. Given the significant global demand to provide telehealth services, it is important to explore patient receptiveness toward this alternative service model, particularly from regions where it has yet to be implemented. We conducted a cross-sectional study to understand the views and willingness of patients toward the use of telehealth for cancer genetic counseling. A survey was completed by 160 patients of the National Cancer Centre Singapore, and descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. The study found that 95.6% (n = 153/160) of participants did not have prior telehealth experience. Most participants were willing or neutral toward having genetic counseling by phone (n = 114/160, 71.3%) and video (n = 106/160, 66.3%). However, majority prefer in-person appointments for first (n = 127/160, 79.4%) and follow-up (n = 97/160, 60.6%) visits over telehealth. Majority agreed that a phone/video consultation would meet most of their needs but voiced concerns regarding privacy and sharing of information (n = 79/160, 49.4% for phone; n = 74/160, 46.3% for video) and whether their emotional needs could be met (n = 61/160, 38.1%). Participants' age, employment status, income, mode of transportation to the appointment, and whether special arrangements were made to attend the in-person appointment were associated with receptivity to telehealth genetic counseling (p ≤ .05 for all). This study adds diversity to existing literature and demonstrates that patients from Asia are generally willing and accepting of the use of telehealth in a cancer genetics service. This will help meet increasing global demand of telehealth consultations in the post-pandemic new norm. Furthermore, it will also provide services for underserved populations and patients requiring urgent testing in a timely manner. Further studies are needed to explore the cost-effectiveness and fair billing methods, as well as willingness and acceptability of telehealth genetic counseling in post-COVID times.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Telemedicine , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Neoplasms/genetics , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Am J Clin Dermatol ; 22(4): 467-475, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1174044

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has fundamentally transformed the landscape of providing dermatologic care. In an age of lockdowns and social distancing, teledermatology (TD) has emerged as a powerful tool to deliver remote care. Here, we review literature on TD use during the pandemic to evaluate the positives and negatives of TD implementation. We especially consider the reception of TD in underserved communities and the developing world as well as the ethico-legal challenges wrought by the burgeoning utilization of this new paradigm of care. The potential of TD to occupy a more prominent role in dermatologic care in a post-COVID-19 world is also discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatology/trends , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Telemedicine/trends , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Am Surg ; 88(7): 1703-1707, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1143113

ABSTRACT

To supplement preexisting wellness programming for the surgery clerkship, a faculty surgeon at Vanderbilt initiated Fireside Chats (FC) in 2015. Inspired by Franklin Roosevelt's Depression-era radio broadcasts, FC features small group sizes, off-campus excursions, and a reimagining of the mentor-mentee relationship that eschews hierarchy in favor of deep, mutualistic connections in both personal and professional domains. Here we describe the rationale and implementation of FC and present survey data that demonstrate the warm reception of FC and its efficacy in stewarding the mental health of medical students. Moreover, unlike large group activities such as "learning communities," FC continues to meet in-person during COVID-19 and preserves social engagement opportunities that may alleviate pandemic-induced isolation and distress.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Humans , Mentors , Pandemics/prevention & control , Students, Medical/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
OTO Open ; 5(1): 2473974X21997392, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1143108

ABSTRACT

Due to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, several American Board of Medical Specialties members have implemented board exams in an online format. In response, we decided to evaluate the efficacy and receptiveness of otolaryngology faculty and residents to a web-based virtual mock oral examination (MOE). Faculty and residents from DC-metropolitan institutions were recruited for decentralized virtual MOE in early 2020. A total of 28 faculty and 20 residents signed up. Follow-up included a survey study consisting of Likert scale and free-text questions to evaluate receptiveness. Helpfulness of the exercise was rated as an average of 8.8 and 9.06, respectively, by faculty and residents on a 10-point Likert scale. Likelihood to recommend a similar exercise to others was 9.2 and 9.3, respectively, for faculty and residents. All survey respondents said they would participate again if given the opportunity. We conclude that existing videoconferencing technologies can be effective tools for conducting virtual MOE by otolaryngology residency programs.

6.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 9(1)2020 Dec 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1004766

ABSTRACT

While COVID-19 continues raging worldwide, effective vaccines are highly anticipated. However, vaccine hesitancy is widespread. Survey results on uptake intentions vary and continue to change. This review compared trends and synthesized findings in vaccination receptivity over time across US and international polls, assessing survey design influences and evaluating context to inform policies and practices. Data sources included academic literature (PubMed, Embase, and PsycINFO following PRISMA guidelines), news and official reports published by 20 October 2020. Two researchers independently screened potential peer-reviewed articles and syndicated polls for eligibility; 126 studies and surveys were selected. Declining vaccine acceptance (from >70% in March to <50% in October) with demographic, socioeconomic, and partisan divides was observed. Perceived risk, concerns over vaccine safety and effectiveness, doctors' recommendations, and inoculation history were common factors. Impacts of regional infection rates, gender, and personal COVID-19 experience were inconclusive. Unique COVID-19 factors included political party orientation, doubts toward expedited development/approval process, and perceived political interference. Many receptive participants preferred to wait until others have taken the vaccine; mandates could increase resistance. Survey wording and answer options showed influence on responses. To achieve herd immunity, communication campaigns are immediately needed, focusing on transparency and restoring trust in health authorities.

7.
Am Surg ; 87(12): 1946-1952, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-999384

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 emergency, medical students were mandated to remain home, creating challenges to providing education remotely for third-year clinical rotations. This study aims to assess student reception and investigate objective outcomes to determine if online learning is a suitable alternative. METHODS: Medical students enrolled in the third-year surgical clerkship during COVID-19 were asked to participate in a survey. 19 of 27 (70%) students participated. Content, faculty-led lectures, and resident-led problem-based learning (PBL) sessions were assessed using a ten-point Likert scale. National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) examination, weekly quiz, and oral examination scores were compared to previous years. Student t-tests compared the groups. RESULTS: The median age was 25 years. Comparing in-person to electronic sessions, there was no difference in effectiveness of faculty sessions preparing students for NBME (6.2 vs. 6.7, P = .46) or oral examinations (6.4 vs. 6.8, P = .58); there was also no difference in resident-led PBL sessions preparing students for NBME (7.2 vs. 7.2, P = .92) or oral examinations (7.4 vs. 7.6, P = .74). Comparing this group to students from the previous academic year, there was no difference in weekly quiz (85.3 vs. 87.8, P = .13), oral examination (89.8 vs. 93.9, P = .07), or NBME examination (75.3 vs. 77.4, P = .33) scores. DISCUSSION: Surgical medical didactic education can effectively be conducted remotely through faculty-led lectures and resident-led PBL sessions. Students did not have a preference between in-person and electronic content in preparation for examinations. As scores did not change, electronic education may be adequate for preparing students for examinations in times of crisis such as COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Clerkship/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/organization & administration , General Surgery/education , Adult , Educational Measurement , Female , Florida/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Innovation (N Y) ; 1(2): 100028, 2020 08 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-720752

ABSTRACT

Since the outbreak of COVID-19, many randomized controlled trials have been launched to test the efficacy of promising treatments. These trials will offer great promise for future treatment. However, a public health emergency calls for a balance between gathering sound evidence and granting therapeutic access to promising trial drugs as widely as possible. In an electronic survey, we found that 3.9% of the participants preferred to receive an unproven trial drug directly in the hypothetical scenario of mild COVID-19 infection. This percentage increased drastically to 31.1% and 54.2% in the hypothetical scenario of severe and extremely severe infection, respectively. Our survey indicates a likelihood of substantial receptivity of trial drugs among actual patients in severe conditions. From the perspective of deontological ethics, a trial can only be approved when potential benefits of the investigational treatment are presumed to outweigh risks, so compassionate or off-label use of investigational therapies merits evaluation.

9.
J Am Assoc Nurse Pract ; 33(11): 1050-1054, 2020 Aug 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-710146

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Believed to be zoonotic in origin, COVID-19 is a novel coronavirus subtype, which spreads from person to person through droplet transmission. As of late April, 2020, 895,766 cases of COVID-19 infections were recorded in the United States. This infection was responsible for 50,439 deaths. Because of close, person-to-person proximity, coupled with possible contact with body fluids, transmission of COVID-19 during sexual activity is possible. However, some activities carry higher risks of transmission than others. This article explores the risks of COVID-19 transmission associated with kissing, oral sex (fellatio and annilingus), and anal receptive and anal insertive intercourse among men who have sex with men (MSM). Recommendations for counseling MSM on safer sexual decision-making, many of which are applicable in the general prevention of sexually transmitted infections, are also provided. Nurse practitioners can serve as advocates in preventing sexually associated COVID-19 communication in MSM and contribute to the advancement of this continuously evolving area of public health science.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Homosexuality, Male , Sexually Transmitted Diseases , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/nursing , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Homosexuality, Male/psychology , Homosexuality, Male/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Nurse Practitioners , Risk Factors , Sexual Behavior , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/epidemiology , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/nursing , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/prevention & control , United States/epidemiology
10.
Radiol Med ; 125(10): 926-930, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-640752

ABSTRACT

The Italian College of Breast Radiologists by the Italian Society of Medical Radiology (SIRM) provides recommendations for breast care provision and procedural prioritization during COVID-19 pandemic, being aware that medical decisions must be currently taken balancing patient's individual and community safety: (1) patients having a scheduled or to-be-scheduled appointment for in-depth diagnostic breast imaging or needle biopsy should confirm the appointment or obtain a new one; (2) patients who have suspicious symptoms of breast cancer (in particular: new onset palpable nodule; skin or nipple retraction; orange peel skin; unilateral secretion from the nipple) should request non-deferrable tests at radiology services; (3) asymptomatic women performing annual mammographic follow-up after breast cancer treatment should preferably schedule the appointment within 1 year and 3 months from the previous check, compatibly with the local organizational conditions; (4) asymptomatic women who have not responded to the invitation for screening mammography after the onset of the pandemic or have been informed of the suspension of the screening activity should schedule the check preferably within 3 months from the date of the not performed check, compatibly with local organizational conditions. The Italian College of Breast Radiologists by SIRM recommends precautions to protect both patients and healthcare workers (radiologists, radiographers, nurses, and reception staff) from infection or disease spread on the occasion of breast imaging procedures, particularly mammography, breast ultrasound, breast magnetic resonance imaging, and breast intervention procedures.


Subject(s)
Appointments and Schedules , Betacoronavirus , Breast Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Radiology , Societies, Medical , Aftercare/organization & administration , Asymptomatic Diseases , Breast Neoplasms/psychology , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Early Detection of Cancer/standards , Female , Humans , Italy , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Symptom Assessment/methods , Symptom Assessment/standards
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