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1.
Elife ; 92020 06 15.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-629914

RESUMEN

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in school closures and distancing requirements that have disrupted both work and family life for many. Concerns exist that these disruptions caused by the pandemic may not have influenced men and women researchers equally. Many medical journals have published papers on the pandemic, which were generated by researchers facing the challenges of these disruptions. Here we report the results of an analysis that compared the gender distribution of authors on 1893 medical papers related to the pandemic with that on papers published in the same journals in 2019, for papers with first authors and last authors from the United States. Using mixed-effects regression models, we estimated that the proportion of COVID-19 papers with a woman first author was 19% lower than that for papers published in the same journals in 2019, while our comparisons for last authors and overall proportion of women authors per paper were inconclusive. A closer examination suggested that women's representation as first authors of COVID-19 research was particularly low for papers published in March and April 2020. Our findings are consistent with the idea that the research productivity of women, especially early-career women, has been affected more than the research productivity of men.


Asunto(s)
Autoria , Bibliometría , Infecciones por Coronavirus , Pandemias , Neumonía Viral , Investigadores/estadística & datos numéricos , Mujeres , Eficiencia , Femenino , Humanos , Medicina , Publicaciones Periódicas como Asunto/estadística & datos numéricos , Médicos Mujeres/estadística & datos numéricos , Factores Sexuales , Aislamiento Social , Estados Unidos
2.
Emerg Med J ; 2020 Aug 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-697083

RESUMEN

Telehealth or using technology for a remote medical encounter has become an efficient solution for safe patient care during the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 or COVID-19 pandemic. This medium allows patient immediate healthcare access without the need for an in-person visit. We designed a time-sensitive, practical, effective and innovative scale-up of telehealth services as a response to the demand for COVID-19 evaluation and testing. As more patients made appointments through the institution's telehealth programme, we increased the number of clinicians available. JeffConnect, the acute care telehealth programme, was expanded to increase staffing from a standing staff of 37-187 doctors within 72 hours. Telehealth care clinicians primarily trained in emergency medicine, internal medicine and family medicine followed a patient decision pathway to risk stratify patients into three groups: home quarantine no testing, home quarantine with outpatient COVID-19 testing and referral for in-person evaluation in the ED, for symptomatic and potentially unstable patients.

3.
AEM Education and Training ; n/a(n/a), 2020.
Artículo | WHO COVID | ID: covidwho-639518

RESUMEN

Abstract In mid-March 2020, many North American emergency medicine (EM) physician educators found their campuses closed, educational programs canceled, and research projects furloughed as operations were directed to the clinical arena due to the novel coronavirus of 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic Widespread need for personal protective equipment (PPE) and viral testing led to concerns over supply and rationing

4.
Elife ; 92020 06 15.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-598772

RESUMEN

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in school closures and distancing requirements that have disrupted both work and family life for many. Concerns exist that these disruptions caused by the pandemic may not have influenced men and women researchers equally. Many medical journals have published papers on the pandemic, which were generated by researchers facing the challenges of these disruptions. Here we report the results of an analysis that compared the gender distribution of authors on 1893 medical papers related to the pandemic with that on papers published in the same journals in 2019, for papers with first authors and last authors from the United States. Using mixed-effects regression models, we estimated that the proportion of COVID-19 papers with a woman first author was 19% lower than that for papers published in the same journals in 2019, while our comparisons for last authors and overall proportion of women authors per paper were inconclusive. A closer examination suggested that women's representation as first authors of COVID-19 research was particularly low for papers published in March and April 2020. Our findings are consistent with the idea that the research productivity of women, especially early-career women, has been affected more than the research productivity of men.


Asunto(s)
Autoria , Bibliometría , Infecciones por Coronavirus , Pandemias , Neumonía Viral , Investigadores/estadística & datos numéricos , Mujeres , Eficiencia , Femenino , Humanos , Medicina , Publicaciones Periódicas como Asunto/estadística & datos numéricos , Médicos Mujeres/estadística & datos numéricos , Factores Sexuales , Aislamiento Social , Estados Unidos
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