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1.
Journal of Business Strategy Finance and Management ; 4(1):5-11, 2022.
Artículo en Inglés | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2025616

RESUMEN

Because of the unexpected changes in business practices tempted by the COVID-19 pandemic, human resource (HR) specialists are working hard to guide and help employees in adapting to the new way of working. On the other hand, HR managers must be prepared to cope with the issues that may occur as businesses adjust to the new normal. The goal of this article is to look at the issues of human resources in the post-COVID-19 era. The study identifies and defines some unique problems that any organization's HR department will confront following the pandemic. Secondary data for this narrative literature study was acquired from various sources, including published articles, reports, and websites. The study's findings are the result of a rigorous review of pertinent data. Remote working concerns, workforce engagement, maintenance, more flexibility, maintaining work-life balance, and raising employee morale were highlighted as long-term Human Resource Management (HRM) challenges in the COVID-19 new normal by this study. The importance of this research lies in the implications it has for businesses as they respond to change. HR professionals can use the study's findings to develop successful methods for adapting to the new reality created by the COVID-19 epidemic. This could assist HR leaders in being better prepared for the post-pandemic new business age.

2.
Trees, Forests and People ; : 100119, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1284570

RESUMEN

The global pandemic due to COVID-19 (SARS-COV-2) has brought significant disruption to society and the environment. In this study, evidence from newspapers, social media, remote sensing and organisational data were used to assess the impact of national lockdown on forest and wildlife conservation, including the forest-dependent people in Bangladesh. The nationwide lockdown worsened the non-forest income-generating activities of the forest-dependent communities leading to increased pressure on neighbouring forests. Global Land Analysis and Discovery (GLAD) data reveal spurred deforestation alerts in May 2020, and about 222 ha forest area had been cleared during January to October 2020, which is 8% more than the whole year of 2019. Despite some positive information about the free movement of wildlife in the forest, a total of 112 animals were killed, which is 28 times more than that of the same lockdown period in 2019. At the same time, wildlife rescuing plummeted by more than 40%. Complete banning of tourism activities brought a significant reduction in income and employment, leading to the collapse of the tourism industry. Lack of tourists, on the other hand, brought a blessing to the wildlife, allowing them to roam freely. Both air and water quality were improved in Dhaka city, and increased aquatic wildlife activities were recorded in the major rivers. The forest department's revenue shrank substantially during the lockdown period in Bangladesh more than that of the previous year. This study highlighted a substantial impact on all aspects of forest and wildlife conservation and on the forest-dependent people, which might be a pitfall for attaining the achievements of national and international conservation goals and treaties. It furthermore highlighted policy implications that would be effective in minimising pandemic-wrought threats and maintain and foster conservation activities in different forests in Bangladesh.

3.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(8)2021 Apr 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1178286

RESUMEN

Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are hormonally active compounds in the environment that interfere with the body's endocrine system and consequently produce adverse health effects. Despite persistent public health concerns, EDCs remain important components of common consumer products, thus representing ubiquitous contaminants to humans. While scientific evidence confirmed their contribution to the severity of Influenza A virus (H1N1) in the animal model, their roles in susceptibility and clinical outcome of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) cannot be underestimated. Since its emergence in late 2019, clinical reports on COVID-19 have confirmed that severe disease and death occur in persons aged ≥65 years and those with underlying comorbidities. Major comorbidities of COVID-19 include diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, cancer, and kidney and liver diseases. Meanwhile, long-term exposure to EDCs contributes significantly to the onset and progression of these comorbid diseases. Besides, EDCs play vital roles in the disruption of the body's immune system. Here, we review the recent literature on the roles of EDCs in comorbidities contributing to COVID-19 mortality, impacts of EDCs on the immune system, and recent articles linking EDCs to COVID-19 risks. We also recommend methodologies that could be adopted to comprehensively study the role of EDCs in COVID-19 risk.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19/epidemiología , Disruptores Endocrinos/inmunología , Disruptores Endocrinos/toxicidad , Enfermedades Transmisibles/epidemiología , Comorbilidad , Disruptores Endocrinos/química , Enfermedades del Sistema Endocrino/inducido químicamente , Humanos
4.
Immunol Lett ; 226: 38-45, 2020 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-643130

RESUMEN

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the causative pathogen of deadly Coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic, which emerged as a major threat to public health across the world. Although there is no clear gender or socioeconomic discrimination in the incidence of COVID-19, individuals who are older adults and/or with comorbidities and compromised immunity have a relatively higher risk of contracting this disease. Since no specific drug has yet been discovered, strengthening immunity along with maintaining a healthy living is the best way to survive this disease. As a healthy practice, calorie restriction in the form of intermittent fasting (IF) in several clinical settings has been reported to promote several health benefits, including priming of the immune response. This dietary restriction also activates autophagy, a cell surveillance system that boosts up immunity. With these prevailing significance in priming host defense, IF could be a potential strategy amid this outbreak to fighting off SARS-CoV-2 infection. Currently, no review so far available proposing IF as an encouraging strategy in the prevention of COVID-19. A comprehensive review has therefore been planned to highlight the beneficial role of fasting in immunity and autophagy, that underlie the possible defense against SARS-CoV-2 infection. The COVID-19 pathogenesis and its impact on host immune response have also been briefly outlined. This review aimed at revisiting the immunomodulatory potential of IF that may constitute a promising preventive approach against COVID-19.


Asunto(s)
Betacoronavirus/inmunología , Infecciones por Coronavirus/etiología , Infecciones por Coronavirus/metabolismo , Susceptibilidad a Enfermedades , Ayuno , Interacciones Huésped-Patógeno , Neumonía Viral/etiología , Neumonía Viral/metabolismo , Autofagia , COVID-19 , Restricción Calórica , Resistencia a la Enfermedad/inmunología , Susceptibilidad a Enfermedades/inmunología , Ayuno/metabolismo , Interacciones Huésped-Patógeno/inmunología , Humanos , Evasión Inmune , Inmunidad , Pandemias , SARS-CoV-2
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