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1.
Brain Behav Immun ; 93: 426-427, 2021 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1179248
2.
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova ; 121(3): 104-109, 2021.
Artículo en Ruso | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1175804

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To assess the mental health of health workers during a pandemic. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eight hundred and twelve medical workers took part in a cross-sectional Internet survey. The questionnaire included a socio-demographic block, a block of questionnaires for assessing the level of symptoms of anxiety and depression (PHQ-9 and GAD-7). The data were processed using statistical methods. RESULTS: The prevalence of anxiety and depression among healthcare providers during the pandemic was 48.77% and 57.63% respectively. Subjectively poor quality of sleep was noted by 37.4% of respondents. Cluster analysis distinguished 4 groups of respondents: group 1 was characterized by high scores on PHQ-9 and GAD-7 and a low subjective assessment of sleep quality; group 2 had low scores on PHQ-9 and GAD-7 and a high subjective assessment of sleep quality; respondents from clusters 3 and 4 had average total scores on PHQ-9 and GAD-7, however, group 4 was characterized by significantly lower values of subjective sleep quality assessment. CONCLUSION: The division into clusters makes it possible to understand which groups of medical workers require psychological (psychotherapeutic) support in the first place. Cluster 1 respondents with high levels of anxiety and depression, as well as poor sleep quality, need priority assistance.


Asunto(s)
Pandemias , Ansiedad/diagnóstico , Ansiedad/epidemiología , Estudios Transversales , Depresión/diagnóstico , Depresión/epidemiología , Personal de Salud , Humanos , Salud Mental , Federación de Rusia/epidemiología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
4.
Depress Anxiety ; 37(4): 302, 2020 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1171049
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(5)2021 03 07.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1170242

RESUMEN

Despite the global impact of COVID-19, studies comparing the effects of COVID-19 on population mental health across countries are sparse. This study aimed to compare anxiety and depression symptoms during the COVID-19 lockdown among adults from 11 countries and to examine their associations with country-level COVID-19 factors and personal COVID-19 exposure. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among adults (≥18 years) in 11 countries (Brazil, Bulgaria, China, India, Ireland, North Macedonia, Malaysia, Singapore, Spain, Turkey, United States). Mental health (anxiety, depression, resilient coping, hope) and other study data were collected between June-August 2020. Of the 13,263 participants, 62.8% were female and 51.7% were 18-34 years old. Participants living in Brazil had the highest anxiety and depression symptoms while participants living in Singapore had the lowest. Greater personal COVID-19 exposure was associated with increased anxiety and depression symptoms, but country-level COVID-19 factors were not. Higher levels of hope were associated with reduced anxiety and depression; higher levels of resilient coping were associated with reduced anxiety but not depression. Substantial variations exist in anxiety and depression symptoms across countries during the COVID-19 lockdown, with personal COVID-19 exposure being a significant risk factor. Strategies that mitigate COVID-19 exposure and enhance hope and resilience may reduce anxiety and depression during global emergencies.


Asunto(s)
Pandemias , Adolescente , Adulto , Ansiedad/epidemiología , Brasil/epidemiología , Bulgaria , China , Control de Enfermedades Transmisibles , Estudios Transversales , Depresión/epidemiología , Femenino , Humanos , India , Irlanda , Malasia , Masculino , Salud Mental , República de Macedonia del Norte , Singapur , España , Turquia , Adulto Joven
6.
PLoS One ; 16(4): e0249716, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1170008

RESUMEN

RATIONAL: During pandemics, including the most recent COVID-19 pandemic, the mental health of university healthcare students' is expected to be affected negatively, impacting the students' learning process. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to assess the level of anxiety and depression of healthcare students living in Jordan, and the effect on their learning process during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted via an online survey completed by students studying a healthcare-oriented degree in a university in Jordan. Participants were recruited through social media (Facebook and WhatsApp). The validated previously published Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) questionnaire was used as a part of the online survey to assess students' anxiety/depression scores. Students' responses regarding their learning process during the COVID-19 was also assessed. RESULTS: The mean age of participants was 21.62 (SD = 4.90), with the majority being females (67.1%). The HADs' assessment revealed that 43.8% and 40.0% of participants had normal anxiety and depression scores, while 22.4% showed borderline abnormal anxiety/depression scores (33.8%). Many students (33.8%) were classified to have abnormal anxiety scores, while a smaller proportion (26.2%) was classified to have abnormal depression scores. Smoking (p = 0.022), lower family income (p = 0.039), and use of medications (p = 0.032) were positively associated with higher (worse) anxiety scores. Ranking the learning process during COVID-19 showed that 45.8% of the participants believed it was a 'good/very good/excellent' process. CONCLUSIONS: Anxiety and depression levels amongst university healthcare students in Jordan were found to be high when assessed during the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition, the learning process during the pandemic was not accepted by more than half of the students. Implementing psychological interventions for healthcare students during pandemics is strongly recommended in order to optimize students' mental health and their learning process alike.


Asunto(s)
Ansiedad/epidemiología , Depresión/epidemiología , Aprendizaje del Sistema de Salud , Estudiantes del Área de la Salud/psicología , Adolescente , Adulto , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Jordania , Masculino , Pandemias , Investigación Cualitativa , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Universidades , Adulto Joven
7.
BMC Psychol ; 9(1): 53, 2021 Apr 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1169986

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: In the case of people who carry an increased number of anxiety traits and maladaptive coping strategies, psychosocial stressors may further increase the level of perceived stress they experience. In our research study, we aimed to examine the levels of perceived stress and health anxiety as well as coping styles among university students amid the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted using an online-based survey at the University of Debrecen during the official lockdown in Hungary when dormitories were closed, and teaching was conducted remotely. Our questionnaire solicited data using three assessment tools, namely, the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), the Ways of Coping Questionnaire (WCQ), and the Short Health Anxiety Inventory (SHAI). RESULTS: A total of 1320 students have participated in our study and 31 non-eligible responses were excluded. Among the remaining 1289 participants, 948 (73.5%) and 341 (26.5%) were Hungarian and international students, respectively. Female students predominated the overall sample with 920 participants (71.4%). In general, there was a statistically significant positive relationship between perceived stress and health anxiety. Health anxiety and perceived stress levels were significantly higher among international students compared to domestic ones. Regarding coping, wishful thinking was associated with higher levels of stress and anxiety among international students, while being a goal-oriented person acted the opposite way. Among the domestic students, cognitive restructuring as a coping strategy was associated with lower levels of stress and anxiety. Concerning health anxiety, female students (domestic and international) had significantly higher levels of health anxiety compared to males. Moreover, female students had significantly higher levels of perceived stress compared to males in the international group, however, there was no significant difference in perceived stress between males and females in the domestic group. CONCLUSION: The elevated perceived stress levels during major life events can be further deepened by disengagement from home (being away/abroad from country or family) and by using inadequate coping strategies. By following and adhering to the international recommendations, adopting proper coping methods, and equipping oneself with the required coping and stress management skills, the associated high levels of perceived stress and anxiety could be mitigated.


Asunto(s)
Adaptación Psicológica , Ansiedad , Control de Enfermedades Transmisibles , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Pandemias , Estrés Psicológico
8.
BMJ Open Qual ; 10(2)2021 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1169878

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Mealtimes occur six times a day on eating disorder (ED) inpatient units and are a mainstay of treatment for EDs. However, these are often distressing and anxiety provoking times for patients and staff. A product of patients' distress is an increase in ED behaviours specific to mealtimes. The aim of this quality improvement project was to decrease the number of ED behaviours at mealtimes in the dining room through the implementation of initiatives identified through diagnostic work. METHODS: The Model for Improvement was used as the systematic approach for this project. Baseline assessment included observations in the dining room, gathering of qualitative feedback from staff and patients and the development of an ED behaviours form used by patients and staff. The first change idea of a host role in the dining room was introduced, and the impact was assessed. RESULTS: The introduction of the host role has reduced the average number of ED behaviours per patient in the dining room by 35%. Postintervention feedback demonstrated that the introduction of the host role tackled the disorganisation and chaotic feeling in the dining room which in turn has reduced distress and anxiety for patients and staff. CONCLUSIONS: This paper shows the realities of a quality improvement (QI) project on an ED inpatient unit during the COVID-19 pandemic. The results are positive for changes made; however, a large challenge, as described has been staff engagement.


Asunto(s)
Trastornos de Alimentación y de la Ingestión de Alimentos/psicología , Servicio de Alimentación en Hospital/normas , Comidas/psicología , Mejoramiento de la Calidad , Adulto , Ansiedad/psicología , Técnicas de Observación Conductual , Trastornos de Alimentación y de la Ingestión de Alimentos/terapia , Femenino , Humanos , Pacientes Internos/psicología , Masculino , Personal de Hospital/psicología , Investigación Cualitativa , Estrés Psicológico/psicología
9.
Anticancer Res ; 41(4): 1971-1974, 2021 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1168333

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND/AIM: Oncological care has faced several challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic, e.g. treatment delay and worsening symptoms. Patient-reported anxiety, depression and sleep quality might have changed due to these special circumstances. Therefore, we analyzed the symptom burden of patients treated with palliative radiotherapy at our center. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A retrospective study was performed of 50 consecutive patients and the results were compared to those obtained in a previous pre-COVID study. The Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale was employed to assess the preradiotherapy symptoms. RESULTS: The highest mean scores were reported for pain in activity (3.2) and dry mouth (3.1). Regarding anxiety, sadness/depression and sleep, the corresponding scores were 1.5, 1.2 and 2.7, respectively. Compared to the previous study, no significant increases were found. Most items had numerically lower mean values, e.g. anxiety (1.5 vs. 2.7). Both study populations had comparable median age (70.5 vs. 70 years), gender distribution and proportion of patients with bone metastases. However, there were two significant imbalances, namely a lower proportion of patients with prostate cancer (12 vs. 30%, p=0.02) and breast cancer (0 vs. 12%, p=0.02). CONCLUSION: In patients who showed up for radiation treatment planning, the suspected increase in anxiety, sadness/depression and sleep disturbance was not demonstrable. It is not known whether or not patients with substantial worries chose to decline referral to palliative radiotherapy. Therefore, comprehensive large-scale studies of patterns of care are needed to fully understand the impact of COVID-19-related measures.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Costo de Enfermedad , Neoplasias/radioterapia , Cuidados Paliativos/métodos , Pandemias , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Ansiedad/epidemiología , Ansiedad/etiología , Neoplasias Óseas/epidemiología , Neoplasias Óseas/secundario , Dolor en Cáncer/diagnóstico , Dolor en Cáncer/epidemiología , Dolor en Cáncer/etiología , Depresión/epidemiología , Depresión/etiología , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Neoplasias/complicaciones , Neoplasias/epidemiología , Neoplasias/patología , Noruega/epidemiología , Estudios Retrospectivos , Análisis de Supervivencia , Evaluación de Síntomas
10.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 70(13): 490-494, 2021 Apr 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1168279

RESUMEN

The spread of disease and increase in deaths during large outbreaks of transmissible diseases is often associated with fear and grief (1). Social restrictions, limits on operating nonessential businesses, and other measures to reduce pandemic-related mortality and morbidity can lead to isolation and unemployment or underemployment, further increasing the risk for mental health problems (2). To rapidly monitor changes in mental health status and access to care during the COVID-19 pandemic, CDC partnered with the U.S. Census Bureau to conduct the Household Pulse Survey (HPS). This report describes trends in the percentage of adults with symptoms of an anxiety disorder or a depressive disorder and those who sought mental health services. During August 19, 2020-February 1, 2021, the percentage of adults with symptoms of an anxiety or a depressive disorder during the past 7 days increased significantly (from 36.4% to 41.5%), as did the percentage reporting that they needed but did not receive mental health counseling or therapy during the past 4 weeks (from 9.2% to 11.7%). Increases were largest among adults aged 18-29 years and among those with less than a high school education. HPS data can be used in near real time to evaluate the impact of strategies that address mental health status and care of adults during the COVID-19 pandemic and to guide interventions for groups that are disproportionately affected.


Asunto(s)
Ansiedad/epidemiología , Ansiedad/terapia , Trastorno Depresivo/epidemiología , Trastorno Depresivo/terapia , Servicios de Salud Mental/estadística & datos numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Factores de Riesgo , Factores Socioeconómicos , Estados Unidos/epidemiología , Adulto Joven
11.
PLoS One ; 16(4): e0248741, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1167097

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: To characterize psychological distress and factors associated with distress in healthcare practitioners working during a stringent lockdown in a country (Jordan) that had exhibited one of the lowest incidence rates of Covid-19 globally at the time of the survey. METHODS: A cross-sectional online survey sent to healthcare practitioners working in various hospitals and community pharmacies. Demographic, professional and psychological characteristics (distress using Kessler-6 questionnaire, anxiety, depression, burnout, sleep issues, exhaustion) were measured as were sources of fear. Descriptive and multivariable statistics were performed using level of distress as the outcome. RESULTS: We surveyed 937 practitioners (56.1% females). Approximately 68%, 14%, and 18% were nurses/technicians, physicians, and pharmacists (respectively). 32% suffered from high distress while 20% suffered from severe distress. Exhaustion, anxiety, depression, and sleep disturbances were reported (in past seven days) by approximately 34%, 34%, 19%, and 29% of subjects (respectively). Being older or male, a positive perception of communications with peers, and being satisfied at work, were significantly associated with lower distress. Conversely, suffering burnout; reporting sleep-related functional problems; exhaustion; being a pharmacist (relative to a physician); working in a cancer center; harboring fear about virus spreading; fear that the virus threatened life; fear of alienation from family/friends; and fear of workload increases, were significantly associated with higher distress. CONCLUSION: Despite low caseloads, Jordanian practitioners still experienced high levels of distress. Identified demographic, professional and psychological factors influencing distress should inform interventions to improve medical professionals' resilience and distress likelihood, regardless of the variable Covid-19 situation.


Asunto(s)
Agotamiento Profesional/psicología , Personal de Salud , Distrés Psicológico , Cuarentena , Adulto , Ansiedad/psicología , /psicología , Estudios Transversales , Depresión/psicología , Miedo/psicología , Femenino , Personal de Salud/psicología , Personal de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Jordania , Masculino , Cuarentena/psicología , Cuarentena/estadística & datos numéricos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
12.
PLoS One ; 16(4): e0239244, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1167001

RESUMEN

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the mental health, physical activity, and sedentary behavior of people worldwide. According to the Health Belief Model (HBM), health-related behavior is determined by perceived barriers and motivators. Using an online survey with 1669 respondents, we sought to understand why and how physical activity and sedentary behavior has changed by querying about perceived barriers and motivators to physical activity that changed because of the pandemic, and how those changes impacted mental health. The following results were statistically significant at p < .05. Consistent with prior reports, our respondents were less physically active (aerobic activity, -11%; strength-based activity, -30%) and more sedentary (+11%) during the pandemic as compared to 6-months before. The pandemic also increased psychological stress (+22%) and brought on moderate symptoms of anxiety and depression. Respondents' whose mental health deteriorated the most were also the ones who were least active (depression r = -.21, anxiety r = -.12). The majority of respondents were unmotivated to exercise because they were too anxious (+8%,), lacked social support (+6%), or had limited access to equipment (+23%) or space (+41%). The respondents who were able to stay active reported feeling less motivated by physical health outcomes such as weight loss (-7%) or strength (-14%) and instead more motivated by mental health outcomes such as anxiety relief (+14%). Coupled with previous work demonstrating a direct relationship between mental health and physical activity, these results highlight the potential protective effect of physical activity on mental health and point to the need for psychological support to overcome perceived barriers so that people can continue to be physically active during stressful times like the pandemic.


Asunto(s)
Ejercicio Físico/psicología , Salud Mental , Motivación , Conducta Sedentaria , Estrés Psicológico/psicología , Adolescente , Adulto , Anciano , Ansiedad , /psicología , Depresión , Femenino , Conductas Relacionadas con la Salud , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Pandemias , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adulto Joven
13.
Appetite ; 161: 105082, 2021 06 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1163352

RESUMEN

The global coronavirus pandemic (Covid 19) resulted in national lockdowns where individuals were asked to isolate in their homes to stop the spread of the disease. Using a cross-sectional survey, the current paper aimed to examine self-reported changes in eating patterns and behaviour during the lockdown in the UK, and associations with BMI, demographic variables, eating styles, health anxiety, food insecurity and coping strategies. Participants (N = 620) were recruited online through social media advertising. The results showed that there were self-reported changes to food consumption during the lockdown across the sample. Increases in consumption of HED (high energy density) snack foods during the lockdown was associated with sex, pre-lockdown eating behaviour (emotional eating and uncontrolled eating), and Covid-specific health anxiety. Increases in positive eating practices such as eating more home prepared foods, and fruits and vegetables, were associated with adaptive coping strategies. Higher emotional eating (EE) during the lockdown was associated with a higher BMI, higher pre-lockdown EE and maladaptive coping strategies. Maladaptive coping strategies moderated the relationship between BMI and EE during the lockdown. In particular a higher BMI was associated with higher EE during the lockdown if an individual also had higher maladaptive coping strategies. These findings suggest that changes to eating behaviour may be part of a wider style of maladaptive or adaptive coping, particularly in those with a history of EE or uncontrolled eating. Preparing individuals to adopt more adaptive coping strategies during lockdown situations may be crucial to improving health during subsequent the lockdown events.


Asunto(s)
Adaptación Psicológica , Ansiedad/epidemiología , Índice de Masa Corporal , Conducta Alimentaria/psicología , Adolescente , Adulto , Anciano , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Pandemias , Autoinforme , Bocadillos , Reino Unido , Adulto Joven
14.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(13): e25207, 2021 Apr 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1161106

RESUMEN

ABSTRACT: To examine the knowledge level, behaviors, and psychological status of the Chinese population during the COVID-19 pandemic, and to explore the differences between urban and rural areas.We carried out a cross-sectional survey of the knowledge, behaviors related to COVID-19, and mental health in a probability sample of 3001 community residents in 30 provinces or districts across China from February 16-23, 2020. Convenience sampling and a snowball sampling were adopted. We used General Anxiety Disorder (GAD), the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), and knowledge and behaviors questionnaire of community residents regarding COVID-19 designed by us to investigate the psychological status, disease-related knowledge, and the behavior of Chinese urban and rural residents during the pandemic.The average score of anxiety and depression among urban residents was 9.15 and 11.25, respectively, while the figures in rural areas were 8.69 and 10.57, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference in the levels of anxiety (P < .01) and depression (P < .01). Urban participants reported significantly higher levels of knowledge regarding COVID-19 in all aspects (transmission, prevention measures, symptoms of infection, treatment, and prognosis) (P < .01), compared to their rural counterparts. While a majority of respondents in urban areas obtained knowledge through WeChat, other apps, and the Internet (P < .01), residents in rural areas accessed information through interactions with the community (P < .01). Urban residents fared well in exchanging knowledge about COVID-19 and advising others to take preventive measures (P < .01), but fared poorly in advising people to visit a hospital if they displayed symptoms of the disease, compared to rural residents (P < .01). Regression analysis with behavior showed that being female (OR = 2.106, 95%CI = 1.259-3.522), aged 18 ≤ age < 65 (OR = 4.059, 95%CI = 2.166-7.607), being satisfied with the precautions taken by the community (OR = 2.594, 95%CI = 1.485-4.530), disinfecting public facilities in the community (OR = 2.342, 95%CI = 1.206-4.547), having knowledge of transmission modes (OR = 3.987, 95%CI: 2.039, 7.798), symptoms (OR = 2.045, 95%CI = 1.054-4.003), and outcomes (OR = 2.740, 95%CI = 1.513-4.962) of COVID-19, and not having anxiety symptoms (OR = 2.578, 95%CI = 1.127-5.901) were positively associated with affirmative behavior in urban areas. Being married (OR = 4.960, 95%CI = 2.608-9.434), being satisfied with the precautions taken by the community (OR = 2.484, 95%CI = 1.315-4.691), screening to ensure face mask wearing before entering the community (OR = 8.809, 95%CI = 2.649-19.294), and having knowledge about precautions (OR = 4.886, 95%CI = 2.604-9.167) and outcomes (OR = 2.657, 95%CI = 1.309-5.391) were positively associated with acceptable conduct in rural areas.The status of anxiety and depression among urban residents was more severe compared to those living in rural areas. There was a difference in being positively associated with constructive behaviors between rural and urban areas.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Salud Mental/estadística & datos numéricos , Población Rural/estadística & datos numéricos , Población Urbana/estadística & datos numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , Factores de Edad , Anciano , Ansiedad/epidemiología , China/epidemiología , Estudios Transversales , Depresión/epidemiología , Desinfección/métodos , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Pandemias , Factores Sexuales , Factores Socioeconómicos , Adulto Joven
15.
J Nutr Health Aging ; 25(4): 440-447, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1160647

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to abrupt restrictions of life-space mobility. The impact of shelter-in-place orders on older adults' health and well-being is still unclear. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between life-space mobility and quality of life (QoL) in older adults with and without frailty during the COVID-19 pandemic. DESIGN: Multicenter prospective cohort study based on structured telephone interviews. SETTING: Four geriatric outpatient clinics in the metropolitan area of Sao Paulo, Brazil. PARTICIPANTS: 557 community-dwelling adults aged 60 years and older. MEASUREMENTS: The Life-Space Assessment was used to measure community mobility before and during the COVID-19 pandemic, and a previously validated decrease of ≥ 5 points defined restricted life-space mobility. Frailty was assessed through the FRAIL (fatigue, resistance, ambulation, illnesses, and loss of weight) scale. The impact of shelter-in-place orders on QoL was evaluated with the question «How is the COVID-19 pandemic affecting your QoL?¼, to which participants could respond «not at all¼, «to some extent¼, or «to a great extent¼. We used ordinal logistic regressions to investigate the relationship between restricted life-space mobility and impact on QoL, adjusting our analyses for demographics, frailty, comorbidities, cognition, functionality, loneliness, depression, and anxiety. We explored whether frailty modified the association between life-space mobility and impact on QoL. RESULTS: Participants were on average 80±8 years old, 65% were women, and 33% were frail. The COVID-19 quarantine led to a restriction of community mobility in 79% of participants and affected the QoL for 77% of participants. We found that restricted life-space mobility was associated with impact on QoL in older adults during the pandemic, although frailty modified the magnitude of the association (P-value for interaction=0.03). Frail participants who experienced restricted life-space mobility had twice the odds of reporting an impact on QoL when compared with non-frail individuals, with respective adjusted odds ratios of 4.20 (95% CI=2.36-7.50) and 2.18 (95% CI=1.33-3.58). CONCLUSION: Older adults experienced substantial decreases in life-space mobility during the COVID-19 pandemic, and this unexpected change impacted their QoL. Providers should be particularly watchful for the consequences of abrupt life-space restrictions on frail individuals.


Asunto(s)
/psicología , Anciano Frágil/psicología , Fragilidad/psicología , Evaluación Geriátrica/estadística & datos numéricos , Calidad de Vida/psicología , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Ansiedad/psicología , Brasil , Estudios Transversales , Depresión/psicología , Fatiga/psicología , Femenino , Humanos , Vida Independiente , Entrevistas como Asunto , Soledad/psicología , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Estudios Prospectivos
16.
Global Health ; 17(1): 32, 2021 03 29.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1158212

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The recent outbreak of COVID-19 has impacted adversely upon the mental health of millions of people worldwide. Impacts on the mental health conditions and the associated predictors relating to adults in Pakistan, the fifth most populous country in the world, during the COVID-19 remain understudied. Our aim was to investigate distress, anxiety, and overall mental health and their associated predictors among Pakistani adults in this pandemic. We specifically examine mental health issues based on the distance from the epicenter, (a predictor that has revealed opposing evidence in other countries) based on the theories of typhoon eye effect and ripple effect. The sample consisted of 601 adults who were surveyed online about 2.5 months into the outbreak across Pakistan with varying distances from the epicenter of COVID-19 of Karachi. RESULTS: The results showed that 9.2 and 19.0% of the participants surpassed the cut-off criteria for distress and anxiety disorders, respectively. Overall, the distance from the epicenter positively predicted the mental health of adults in Pakistan, and family size negatively moderated this effect. The distance from the epicenter negatively predicted distress and anxiety disorders for adults in large families, which are quite common in Pakistan. CONCLUSION: The evidence of the study interestingly finds that the prediction of the mental health of people by their distance from the epicenter depends on family size. The evidence of this study can help to provide initial indicators for mental health care providers to screen vulnerable groups in Pakistan, a populous country that continues struggling to cope with the COVID-19 pandemic.


Asunto(s)
Ansiedad/etiología , Composición Familiar , Trastornos Mentales/etiología , Salud Mental , Pandemias , Estrés Psicológico/etiología , Adaptación Psicológica , Adulto , Anciano , Trastornos de Ansiedad/etiología , Tormentas Ciclónicas , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Pakistán , Factores de Riesgo , Análisis Espacial , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adulto Joven
17.
Global Health ; 17(1): 34, 2021 03 29.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1158211

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Mental burden due to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has been widely reported for the general public and specific risk groups like healthcare workers and different patient populations. We aimed to assess its impact on mental health during the early phase by comparing pandemic with prepandemic data and to identify potential risk and protective factors. METHODS: For this systematic review and meta-analyses, we systematically searched PubMed, PsycINFO, and Web of Science from January 1, 2019 to May 29, 2020, and screened reference lists of included studies. In addition, we searched PubMed and PsycINFO for prepandemic comparative data. Survey studies assessing mental burden by the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic in the general population, healthcare workers, or any patients (eg, COVID-19 patients), with a broad range of eligible mental health outcomes, and matching studies evaluating prepandemic comparative data in the same population (if available) were included. We used multilevel meta-analyses for main, subgroup, and sensitivity analyses, focusing on (perceived) stress, symptoms of anxiety and depression, and sleep-related symptoms as primary outcomes. RESULTS: Of 2429 records retrieved, 104 were included in the review (n = 208,261 participants), 43 in the meta-analysis (n = 71,613 participants). While symptoms of anxiety (standardized mean difference [SMD] 0.40; 95% CI 0.15-0.65) and depression (SMD 0.67; 95% CI 0.07-1.27) were increased in the general population during the early phase of the pandemic compared with prepandemic conditions, mental burden was not increased in patients as well as healthcare workers, irrespective of COVID-19 patient contact. Specific outcome measures (eg, Patient Health Questionnaire) and older comparative data (published ≥5 years ago) were associated with increased mental burden. Across the three population groups, existing mental disorders, female sex, and concerns about getting infected were repeatedly reported as risk factors, while older age, a good economic situation, and education were protective. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis paints a more differentiated picture of the mental health consequences in pandemic situations than previous reviews. High-quality, representative surveys, high granular longitudinal studies, and more research on protective factors are required to better understand the psychological impacts of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic and to help design effective preventive measures and interventions that are tailored to the needs of specific population groups.


Asunto(s)
/psicología , Trastornos Mentales/etiología , Salud Mental , Pandemias , Adolescente , Adulto , Anciano , Ansiedad/epidemiología , Ansiedad/etiología , Depresión/epidemiología , Depresión/etiología , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Trastornos Mentales/epidemiología , Persona de Mediana Edad , Factores Protectores , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/epidemiología , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/etiología , Estrés Psicológico/epidemiología , Estrés Psicológico/etiología
18.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(7)2021 03 28.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1154418

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate sleep and awakening quality (SQ and AQ) during COVID-19 in a large and diversified population in order to identify significant associations and risks in terms of demography, health and health-related behaviors, sleep variables, mental health, and attitudes. METHODS/RESULTS: Online surveys were used for data collection, received from 5479 individuals from the general population, sleep disorder patients, and COVID-involved (medical doctors (MDs) and nurses) and COVID-affected professionals (teachers, psychologists, and dentists). SQ and AQ were worse in adults, females, and high-education subjects. Feeling worse, having economic problems, depression, anxiety, irritability, and a high Calamity Experience Check List (CECL) score during COVID were significantly associated with poor SQ and AQ. Shorter sleep duration, increased latency, poor nutrition, low physical activity, increased mobile and social network use, more negative and less positive attitudes and behaviors were associated with poor AQ. CONCLUSIONS: The SQ logistic regression showed gender, morbidities, CECL, and awakenings as relevant, whereas, for AQ, relevant variables further included age and physical activity. Aiming to have a high stress compliance, each individual should sleep well, have important control of their mood, practice positive behaviors while dismissing negative behaviors and attitudes, practice exercise, have adequate nutrition, and beware of technologies and dependences.


Asunto(s)
Adulto , Ansiedad/epidemiología , Femenino , Conductas Relacionadas con la Salud , Humanos , Sueño , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(7)2021 03 27.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1154416

RESUMEN

The COVID-19 pandemic has contributed to mental health problems worldwide. Nurses are particularly prone to stress because they directly care for individuals with suspected or confirmed cases of COVID-19. The aims of this study were (a) to explore the association between the mental health promotion strategies used by nurses during the COVID-19 outbreak and their symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress; (b) to compare the symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress of mental health nurses to those of non-mental health nurses; and (c) to compare the frequency of use of mental health strategies of mental health nurses to those of non-mental health nurses. A cross-sectional study was conducted with a sample of 821 nurses. Univariate and multivariate regression models were developed to identify potential protective factors of depression, anxiety, and stress. The chi-square test was also used to compare the use of strategies among mental health and non-mental health nurses. Portuguese nurses demonstrated high symptoms of depressive symptoms, stress, and anxiety. Healthy eating, physical activity, rest between shifts, maintaining social contacts, verbalizing feelings/emotions, and spending less time searching for information about COVID-19 were associated with better mental health. Mental health nurses had less depression, anxiety, and stress, and used more strategies to promote mental health than other nurses. We consider it important to promote nurses' mental health literacy by encouraging them to develop skills and strategies aimed at improving their resilience and ability to deal with difficult situations while caring for the population.


Asunto(s)
Pandemias , Ansiedad/epidemiología , Estudios Transversales , Depresión/epidemiología , Brotes de Enfermedades , Humanos , Portugal/epidemiología
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(7)2021 03 26.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1154408

RESUMEN

Background: The COVID­19 pandemic and associated public health measures have disrupted the lives of people around the world. It is already evident that the direct and indirect psychological and social effects of the COVID­19 pandemic are insidious and affect the mental health of young children and adolescents now and will in the future. The aim and objectives of this knowledge-synthesis study were to identify the impact of the pandemic on children's and adolescent's mental health and to evaluate the effectiveness of different interventions employed during previous and the current pandemic to promote children's and adolescents' mental health. Methodology: We conducted the systematic review according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines and included experimental randomized and nonrandomized controlled trials, observational studies, and qualitative studies. Results: Of the 5828 articles that we retrieved, 18 articles met the inclusion criteria. We thematically analyzed them and put the major findings under the thematic areas of impact of the pandemic on children's and adolescents' mental health. These studies reported that pandemics cause stress, worry, helplessness, and social and risky behavioral problems among children and adolescents (e.g., substance abuse, suicide, relationship problems, academic issues, and absenteeism from work). Interventions such as art-based programs, support services, and clinician-led mental health and psychosocial services effectively decrease mental health issues among children and adolescents. Conclusion: Children and adolescents are more likely to experience high rates of depression and anxiety during and after a pandemic. It is critical that future researchers explore effective mental health strategies that are tailored to the needs of children and adolescents. Explorations of effective channels regarding the development and delivery of evidenced-based, age-appropriate services are vital to lessen the effects and improve long-term capacities for mental health services for children and adolescents. Key Practitioner Message: The COVID-19 pandemic's physical restrictions and social distancing measures have affected each and every domain of life. Although the number of children and adolescents affected by the disease is small, the disease and the containment measures such as social distancing, school closure, and isolation have negatively impacted the mental health and well-being of children and adolescents. The impact of COVID-19 on the mental health of children and adolescents is of great concern. Anxiety, depression, disturbances in sleep and appetite, as well as impairment in social interactions are the most common presentations. It has been indicated that compared to adults, this pandemic may continue to have increased long term adverse consequences on children's and adolescents' mental health. As the pandemic continues, it is important to monitor the impact on children's and adolescents' mental health status and how to help them to improve their mental health outcomes in the time of the current or future pandemics.


Asunto(s)
Pandemias , Adolescente , Ansiedad , Niño , Preescolar , Humanos , Salud Mental
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