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2.
Circ Arrhythm Electrophysiol ; 13(7): e009007, 2020 07.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-669270
3.
Rheumatol Int ; 40(9): 1353-1360, 2020 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-640396

RESUMEN

As of June 10th 2020 about 7.2 million individuals have tested positive for, and more than 410,000 have died due to COVID-19. In this review we outline the pathophysiology that underpins the potential use of anti-rheumatic therapies for severe COVID-19 infection and summarize the current evidence regarding the risk and outcome of COVID-19 in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases. Thus far there is no convincing evidence that any disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug (conventional synthetic, biologic or targeted synthetic) including hydroxychloroquine, may protect against severe COVID-19 infection; answers about their possible usefulness in the management of the cytokine storm associated with severe COVID-9 infection will only arise from ongoing randomized controlled trials. Evidence on COVID-19 risk and outcome in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases is extremely limited; thus, any conclusions would be unsafe and should be seen with great caution. At present, the risk and severity (hospitalization, intensive care unit admission and death) of COVID-19 infection in people with autoimmune diseases do not appear particularly dissimilar to the general population, with the possible exception of hospitalization in patients exposed to high glucocorticoid doses. At this stage it is impossible to draw any conclusions for differences in COVID-19 risk and outcome between different autoimmune diseases and between the various immunomodulatory therapies used for them. More research in the field is obviously required, including as a minimum careful and systematic epidemiology and appropriately controlled clinical trials.


Asunto(s)
Antirreumáticos/uso terapéutico , Enfermedades Autoinmunes/tratamiento farmacológico , Infecciones por Coronavirus/tratamiento farmacológico , Síndrome de Liberación de Citoquinas/tratamiento farmacológico , Neumonía Viral/tratamiento farmacológico , Anticuerpos Monoclonales Humanizados/uso terapéutico , Enfermedades Autoinmunes/epidemiología , Enfermedades Autoinmunes/inmunología , Betacoronavirus , Comorbilidad , Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Infecciones por Coronavirus/inmunología , Síndrome de Liberación de Citoquinas/inmunología , Humanos , Inhibidores de las Cinasas Janus/uso terapéutico , Pandemias , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Neumonía Viral/inmunología , Factores de Riesgo , Índice de Severidad de la Enfermedad , Inhibidores del factor de Necrosis Tumorales/uso terapéutico
4.
J Am Heart Assoc ; 9(17): e016812, 2020 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-760313

RESUMEN

Background Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is spreading widely around the world. We conducted this meta-analysis to explore the prevalence of cardiovascular comorbidities in COVID-19, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) cases. Methods and Results Relevant reports updated to April 17, 2020, were searched from PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library with no restriction on language. A random-effects model was used in this meta-analysis to obtain pooled proportions of cardiovascular comorbidities in COVID-19, SARS, and MERS. A total of 22 studies (12 for COVID-19, 4 for SARS, and 6 for MERS) were included in this analysis, and the average age of patients with COVID-19, SARS, and MERS was 46.41±1.79, 39.16±2.25, and 52.51±4.64 years, respectively. Proportions of cardiovascular comorbidities in coronavirus diseases were as follows: COVID-19: proportion of hypertension was 17.1% (95% CI, 13.2%-20.9%), proportion of cardiac disease was 4.5% (95% CI, 3.6%-5.5%) and proportion of diabetes mellitus was 8.5% (95% CI, 5.5%-11.4%); SARS: proportion of hypertension was 4.5% (95% CI, 2.0%-7.0%), proportion of cardiac disease was 2.1% (95% CI, 0.6%-3.7%) and proportion of diabetes mellitus was 3.7% (95% CI, 1.0%-6.4%); MERS: proportion of hypertension was 30.3% (95% CI, 18.3%-42.2%), proportion of cardiac disease was 20.9% (95% CI, 10.7%-31.1%), and proportion of diabetes mellitus was 45.4% (95% CI, 27.3%-63.5%). Conclusions The prevalence of cardiovascular comorbidities varies among different coronavirus-associated diseases. With the development of time, proportions of cardiovascular comorbidities in COVID-19 need further attention.


Asunto(s)
Betacoronavirus , Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Síndrome Respiratorio Agudo Grave/epidemiología , Comorbilidad , Salud Global , Humanos , Pandemias , Publicaciones Periódicas como Asunto , Prevalencia
7.
Zhong Nan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban ; 45(5): 542-548, 2020 May 28.
Artículo en Inglés, Chino | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745328

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the clinical characteristics and risk factors for severe events of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in elderly patients. METHODS: Retrospective analysis was performed on the clinical data of all elderly COVID- 19 patients treated in Changsha Public Health Treatment Center from January 17, 2020 to March 15, 2020, which included basic diseases, symptoms, test results, and other clinical characteristics, and prognostic indicators such as severity of illness, length of hospital stay, virus shedding time and mortality rate. The differences in clinical characteristics and prognostic indicators between elderly, middle-aged, and young COVID-19 patients were also analyzed. Logistic regression model was used to conduct univariate and multivariate analysis of risk factors for developing severe events in elderly COVID-19 patients; receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to evaluate the prediction efficacy. RESULTS: Of the 230 COVID-19 adult patients, 34 were young patients (14.8%), 136 were middle-aged patients (59.1%), and 60 were elderly (26.1%). Among the 60 elderly patients, 23 were male (38.3%) and 37 were female (61.7%), with a medium age of 66 years old. Common symptoms were fever (66.7%), cough (50.0%), and fatigue (41.7%). C reactive protein (CRP) was increased significantly. The proportion of severe cases was 31.7%, and mortality was 1.7%. The median length of hospitalization and median virus shedding time were 18.5 days and 21 days, respectively. Compared with the young and the middle-aged patients, the elderly had a higher proportion of hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases, more common shortness of breath, higher proportions of pneumonia and severe cases (all P<0.05), and the decreased lymphocyte count and lymphocyte percentage (both P<0.05), as well as higher CRP and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) levels (both P<0.05). Compared with non-severe cases, severe elderly patients demonstrated higher CRP and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels (all P<0.05), the reduced lymphocyte count (P<0.05), and the prolonged length of hospitalization and virus shedding duration (both P<0.05). Univariate logistic regression analysis indicated that the lymphocytes proportion, CRP and AST levels were significantly correlated with the risk for developing severe events in elderly COVID-19 patients (all P<0.05). Multivariate logistic regression found that severe events in elderly patients with COVID-19 were significantly correlated with CRP level (OR=1.041, P=0.013). ROC curve analysis revealed that the area under the curve (AUC) for CRP to diagnose severe events in elderly COVID 19 patients was 0.851. CONCLUSIONS: The proportion of severe cases in elderly COVID-19 patients is higher than that in young and middle-aged patients. CRP level has a good predictive value for the possibility of severe events in elderly COVID-19 patients.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/diagnóstico , Neumonía Viral/diagnóstico , Adulto , Anciano , Betacoronavirus , Proteína C-Reactiva/análisis , China , Comorbilidad , Infecciones por Coronavirus/fisiopatología , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Pandemias , Neumonía Viral/fisiopatología , Estudios Retrospectivos , Factores de Riesgo
9.
Br J Nutr ; 124(7): 736-741, 2020 10 14.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-744334

RESUMEN

The WHO has announced the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak to be a global pandemic. The distribution of community outbreaks shows seasonal patterns along certain latitude, temperature and humidity, that is, similar to the behaviour of seasonal viral respiratory tract infections. COVID-19 displays significant spread in northern mid-latitude countries with an average temperature of 5­11°C and low humidity. Vitamin D deficiency has also been described as pandemic, especially in Europe. Regardless of age, ethnicity and latitude, recent data showed that 40 % of Europeans are vitamin D deficient (25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels <50 nmol/l), and 13 % are severely deficient (25(OH)D < 30 nmol/l). A quadratic relationship was found between the prevalences of vitamin D deficiency in most commonly affected countries by COVID-19 and the latitudes. Vitamin D deficiency is more common in the subtropical and mid-latitude countries than the tropical and high-latitude countries. The most commonly affected countries with severe vitamin D deficiency are from the subtropical (Saudi Arabia 46 %; Qatar 46 %; Iran 33·4 %; Chile 26·4 %) and mid-latitude (France 27·3 %; Portugal 21·2 %; Austria 19·3 %) regions. Severe vitamin D deficiency was found to be nearly 0 % in some high-latitude countries (e.g. Norway, Finland, Sweden, Denmark and Netherlands). Accordingly, we would like to call attention to the possible association between severe vitamin D deficiency and mortality pertaining to COVID-19. Given its rare side effects and relatively wide safety, prophylactic vitamin D supplementation and/or food fortification might reasonably serve as a very convenient adjuvant therapy for these two worldwide public health problems alike.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Salud Global , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Deficiencia de Vitamina D/epidemiología , Factores de Edad , Comorbilidad , Infecciones por Coronavirus/mortalidad , Infecciones por Coronavirus/terapia , Suplementos Dietéticos , Europa (Continente)/epidemiología , Humanos , Pandemias , Neumonía Viral/mortalidad , Neumonía Viral/terapia , Vitamina D/administración & dosificación , Deficiencia de Vitamina D/terapia
11.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(6): e19934, 2020 06 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-742630

RESUMEN

Since the World Health Organization declared the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak a pandemic, significant changes have occurred in the United States as the infection spread reached and passed its exponential phase. A stringent analysis of COVID-19 epidemiologic data requires time and would generally be expected to happen with significant delay after the exponential phase of the disease is over and when the focus of the health care system is diverted away from crisis management. Although much has been said about high-risk groups and the vulnerability of the elderly and patients with underlying comorbidities, the impact of race on the susceptibility of ethnic minorities living in indigent communities has not been discussed in detail worldwide and specifically in the United States. There are currently some data on disparities between African American and Caucasian populations for COVID-19 infection and mortality. While health care authorities are reorganizing resources and infrastructure to provide care for symptomatic COVID-19 patients, they should not shy away from protecting the general public as a whole and specifically the most vulnerable members of society, such as the elderly, ethnic minorities, and people with underlying comorbidities.


Asunto(s)
Afroamericanos/estadística & datos numéricos , Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Anciano , Betacoronavirus/patogenicidad , Comorbilidad , Prestación de Atención de Salud , Grupos Étnicos/estadística & datos numéricos , Grupo de Ascendencia Continental Europea/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Pandemias , Estados Unidos/epidemiología
13.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(35): e21723, 2020 Aug 28.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-740202

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Novel coronavirus pneumonia (COVID-19) has become a worldwide epidemic, causing huge loss of life and property. Because of its unique pathological mechanism, diabetes affects the prognosis of patients with COVID-19 in many aspects. At present, there are many controversies about whether angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers (ACEI/ARB) should be used in the treatment of patients with diabetes mellitus and COVID-19 comorbidities. There is an urgent need to provide evidence for the use of ACEI/ARB through high-quality systematic evaluation and meta-analysis. METHODS: We will search electronic databases including PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese Science and Technology Periodical Database, and Wanfang database using keywords related to COVID-19, diabetes mellitus, ACEI/ARB drugs, and randomized controlled trials . We will manually search gray literature, such as conference proceedings and academic degree dissertations, and trial registries. Two independent reviewers will screen studies, extract data, and evaluate risk of bias. Data analysis will be conducted using the Review Manager software version 5.3.5 and stata 14.0 software for Mac. Statistical heterogeneity will be assessed using a standard chi-square test with a significance level of P < .10. Biases associated with study will be investigated using funnel plots. RESULTS: This study will provide a high-quality synthesis of efficacy and safety of ACEI/ARB drugs in patients with COVID-19 combined with diabetes mellitus, providing evidence for clinical treatment of diabetes mellitus combined with COVID-19. And the results will be published at a peer-reviewed journal. CONCLUSION: Our study will draw conclusions on the efficacy and safety of ACEI / ARB drugs in patients with diabetes mellitus complicated with covid-19, so as to provide theoretical guidance for clinical practice of diabetes mellitus with covid-19. INPLASY REGISTRATION NUMBER: INPLASY 202060111.


Asunto(s)
Antagonistas de Receptores de Angiotensina/farmacología , Inhibidores de la Enzima Convertidora de Angiotensina/farmacología , Infecciones por Coronavirus , Diabetes Mellitus , Administración del Tratamiento Farmacológico/normas , Pandemias , Neumonía Viral , Betacoronavirus , Comorbilidad , Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Infecciones por Coronavirus/terapia , Diabetes Mellitus/tratamiento farmacológico , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiología , Humanos , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Neumonía Viral/terapia , Ensayos Clínicos Controlados Aleatorios como Asunto , Proyectos de Investigación , Revisiones Sistemáticas como Asunto , Resultado del Tratamiento
14.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(35): e21656, 2020 Aug 28.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-740198

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Assessing the effectiveness and safety of Chinese medicine for the mastitis in COVID-19 patients is the main purpose of this systematic review protocol. METHODS: The following electronic databases will be searched from inception to April 2020: MEDLINE, Ovid, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED), Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), VIP Database and Wanfang Database. In addition, Clinical trial registries, like the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry (ChiCTR), the Netherlands National Trial Register (NTR) and ClinicalTrials.gov, will be searched for ongoing trials with unpublished data. No language restrictions will be applied. The primary outcome will be the time of disappearance of main symptoms (including fever, asthenia, cough disappearance rate, and temperature recovery time), and serum cytokine levels. The secondary outcome will be the accompanying symptoms (such as myalgia, expectoration, stuffiness, runny nose, pharyngalgia, anhelation, chest distress, dyspnea, crackles, headache, nausea, vomiting, anorexia, diarrhea) disappear rate, negative COVID-19 results rate on 2 consecutive occasions (not on the same day), CT image improvement, average hospitalization time, occurrence rate of common type to severe form, clinical cure rate, and mortality. Two independent reviewers will conduct the study selection, data extraction and assessment. RevMan V.5.3 will be used for the assessment of risk of bias and data synthesis. RESULTS: The results will provide a high-quality synthesis of current evidence for researchers in this subject area. CONCLUSION: The conclusion of the study will provide an evidence to judge whether Chinese medicine is effective and safe for mastitis in COVID-19 patients. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42020189924.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus , Mastitis , Medicina China Tradicional/métodos , Pandemias , Manejo de Atención al Paciente/métodos , Neumonía Viral , Betacoronavirus , Comorbilidad , Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Infecciones por Coronavirus/terapia , Femenino , Humanos , Mastitis/epidemiología , Mastitis/terapia , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Neumonía Viral/terapia , Proyectos de Investigación , Revisiones Sistemáticas como Asunto
15.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(35): e21376, 2020 Aug 28.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-740191

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 is an international outbreak of the respiratory illness caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The diseases themselves, as well as the intensity of chemotherapy, lead to significant immunosuppression, leading hematological malignancy patients susceptible to infections. METHODS: This protocol will be performed according to the Meta-analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (MOOSE) guidelines and reported follow the Cochrane Collaboration Handbook and the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guidelines. Electronic databases of PubMed, MEDLINE, Google Scholar, Web of science, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, CNKI, CMB, and Wangfang database from the inception to present will be comprehensively and systematically searched without limitations of language, date, and publication status. Observational, retrospective cohort, prospective case-control, cohort studies, cross-sectional studies, or clinical trials will be included. All assessment of study selection, data extraction, and study quality assessment will be independently performed by 2 reviewers. RevMan V.5.3 program and Stata V.12.0 software will be utilized for the methodological quality assessment and statistical analysis. RESULTS: The result of this systematic review will provide evidence for clinicians on the management of COVID-19 patients with hematological malignancy. CONCLUSION: This systematic review will help raise awareness and guide management of COVID-19 patients with hematological malignancy, as well as to improve outcomes in this population. ETHIC AND DISSEMINATION: The content of this article does not involve moral approval or ethical review because no individual data will be collected. PROSPERO REGISTRATION: CRD42020187493.


Asunto(s)
Antineoplásicos/farmacología , Infecciones por Coronavirus , Neoplasias Hematológicas , Pandemias , Manejo de Atención al Paciente/métodos , Neumonía Viral , Betacoronavirus , Comorbilidad , Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Infecciones por Coronavirus/terapia , Neoplasias Hematológicas/epidemiología , Neoplasias Hematológicas/inmunología , Neoplasias Hematológicas/terapia , Humanos , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Neumonía Viral/terapia , Proyectos de Investigación , Revisiones Sistemáticas como Asunto
16.
J Int Med Res ; 48(8): 300060520949039, 2020 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-739220

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: This study was performed to investigate the clinical characteristics of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). METHODS: We analyzed the electronic medical records of 405 hospitalized patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 in the Third Hospital of Wuhan. RESULTS: The patients' median age was 56 years, 54.1% were female, 11.4% had a history of smoking, and 10.6% had a history of drinking. All cases of COVID-19 were community-acquired. Fever (76.8%) and cough (53.3%) were the most common clinical manifestations, and circulatory system diseases were the most common comorbidities. Gastrointestinal symptoms were present in 61.2% of the patients, and 2.9% of the patients were asymptomatic. Computed tomography showed ground-glass opacities in most patients (72.6%) and consolidation in 30.9%. Lymphopenia (72.3%) and hypoproteinemia (71.6%) were observed in most patients. About 20% of patients had abnormal liver function. Patients with severe disease had significantly more prominent laboratory abnormalities, including an abnormal lymphocyte count and abnormal C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, D-dimer, and albumin levels. CONCLUSION: SARS-CoV-2 causes a variety of severe respiratory illnesses similar to those caused by SARS-CoV-1. Older age, chronic comorbidities, and laboratory abnormalities are associated with disease severity.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/diagnóstico , Infecciones por Coronavirus/patología , Enfermedades Gastrointestinales/diagnóstico , Neumonía Viral/diagnóstico , Neumonía Viral/patología , Adolescente , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Envejecimiento/fisiología , Alanina Transaminasa/sangre , Aspartato Aminotransferasas/sangre , Betacoronavirus , Proteína C-Reactiva/análisis , China , Infecciones Comunitarias Adquiridas/diagnóstico , Infecciones Comunitarias Adquiridas/patología , Infecciones Comunitarias Adquiridas/virología , Comorbilidad , Infecciones por Coronavirus/transmisión , Femenino , Enfermedades Gastrointestinales/patología , Enfermedades Gastrointestinales/virología , Humanos , Recuento de Linfocitos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Pandemias , Neumonía Viral/transmisión , Estudios Retrospectivos , Índice de Severidad de la Enfermedad , Adulto Joven
17.
J Diabetes ; 12(9): 649-658, 2020 Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-737642

RESUMEN

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is caused by a novel betacoronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), similar to SARS-CoV and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS-CoV), which cause acute respiratory distress syndrome and case fatalities. COVID-19 disease severity is worse in older obese patients with comorbidities such as diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and chronic lung disease. Cell binding and entry of betacoronaviruses is via their surface spike glycoprotein; SARS-CoV binds to the metalloprotease angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), MERS-CoV utilizes dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4), and recent modeling of the structure of SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein predicts that it can interact with human DPP4 in addition to ACE2. DPP4 is a ubiquitous membrane-bound aminopeptidase that circulates in plasma; it is multifunctional with roles in nutrition, metabolism, and immune and endocrine systems. DPP4 activity differentially regulates glucose homeostasis and inflammation via its enzymatic activity and nonenzymatic immunomodulatory effects. The importance of DPP4 for the medical community has been highlighted by the approval of DPP4 inhibitors, or gliptins, for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review discusses the dysregulation of DPP4 in COVID-19 comorbid conditions; DPP4 activity is higher in older individuals and increased plasma DPP4 is a predictor of the onset of metabolic syndrome. DPP4 upregulation may be a determinant of COVID-19 disease severity, which creates interest regarding the use of gliptins in management of COVID-19. Also, knowledge of the chemistry and biology of DPP4 could be utilized to develop novel therapies to block viral entry of some betacoronaviruses, potentially including SARS-CoV-2.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/complicaciones , Infecciones por Coronavirus/tratamiento farmacológico , Inhibidores de la Dipeptidil-Peptidasa IV/uso terapéutico , Neumonía Viral/complicaciones , Neumonía Viral/tratamiento farmacológico , Comorbilidad , Dipeptidil Peptidasa 4 , Humanos , Pandemias
18.
J Prim Care Community Health ; 11: 2150132720954687, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-737527

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 is a highly infectious disease which usually presents with respiratory symptoms. This virus is disseminated through respiratory droplets, and, therefore, individuals residing in close quarters are at a higher risk for the acquisition of infection. The prison population is at a significantly increased risk for infection. METHODS: Prisoners from the Montford Correctional facility in Lubbock, Texas, hospitalized in the medical intensive care unit at University Medical Center between March 1, 2020 and May 15, 2020 were compared to community-based patients hospitalized in the same medical intensive care unit. Clinical information, laboratory results, radiographic results, management requirements, and outcomes were compared. RESULTS: A total of 15 community-based patients with a mean age of 67.4 ± 15.5 years were compared to 5 prisoners with a mean age of 56.0 ± 9.0 years. All prisoners were men; 10 community-based patients were men. Prisoners presented with fever, dyspnea, and GI symptoms. The mean number of comorbidities in prisoners was 2.4 compared to 1.8 in community-based patients. Prisoners had significantly lower heart rates and respiratory rates at presentation than community-based patients. The mean length of stay in prisoners was 12.6 ± 8.9 days; the mean length of stay in community-based patients was 8.6 ± 6.5. The case fatality rate was 60% in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: Prisoners were younger than community-based patients but required longer lengths of stay and had the same mortality rate. This study provides a basis for comparisons with future studies which could involve new treatment options currently under study.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/terapia , Cuidados Críticos/estadística & datos numéricos , Pandemias , Pacientes/estadística & datos numéricos , Neumonía Viral/terapia , Prisioneros/estadística & datos numéricos , Centros Médicos Académicos , Distribución por Edad , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Comorbilidad , Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Infecciones por Coronavirus/mortalidad , Femenino , Hospitalización , Humanos , Unidades de Cuidados Intensivos , Tiempo de Internación/estadística & datos numéricos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Neumonía Viral/mortalidad , Estudios Retrospectivos , Texas/epidemiología , Resultado del Tratamiento
19.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 640, 2020 Aug 31.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-736377

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the world deeply, with more than 14,000,000 people infected and nearly 600,000 deaths. This review aimed to summarize the epidemiologic traits, clinical spectrum, CT results and laboratory findings of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We scoped for relevant literatures published during 1st December 2019 to 16th July 2020 based on three databases using English and Chinese languages. We reviewed and analyzed the relevant outcomes. RESULTS: The COVID-19 pandemic was found to have a higher transmission rate compared to SARS and MERS and involved 4 stages of evolution. The basic reproduction number (R0) is 3.32 (95% CI:3.24-3.39), the incubation period was 5.24 days (95% CI:3.97-6.50, 5 studies) on average, and the average time for symptoms onset varied by countries. Common clinical spectrums identified included fever (38.1-39.0 °C), cough and fatigue, with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) being the most common complication reported. Body temperatures above 39.0 °C, dyspnea, and anorexia were more common symptoms in severe patients. Aged over 65 years old, having co-morbidities, and developing complications were the commonest high-risk factors associated with severe conditions. Leucopenia and lymphopenia were the most common signs of infection while liver and kidney damage were rare but may cause bad outcomes for patients. The bilateral, multifocal Ground-Glass Opacification (GGO) on peripheral, and the consolidative pulmonary opacity were the most frequent CT results and the tendency of mortality rates differed by region. CONCLUSIONS: We provided a bird's-eye view of the COVID-19 during the current pandemic, which will help better understanding the key traits of the disease. The findings could be used for disease's future research, control and prevention.


Asunto(s)
Betacoronavirus/fisiología , Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Linfopenia/epidemiología , Pandemias , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Síndrome de Dificultad Respiratoria del Adulto/epidemiología , Factores de Edad , Anciano , Comorbilidad , Infecciones por Coronavirus/mortalidad , Infecciones por Coronavirus/patología , Infecciones por Coronavirus/transmisión , Tos/epidemiología , Demografía , Progresión de la Enfermedad , Disnea/epidemiología , Fatiga/epidemiología , Femenino , Fiebre/epidemiología , Humanos , Laboratorios , Masculino , Neumonía Viral/mortalidad , Neumonía Viral/patología , Neumonía Viral/transmisión , Factores de Riesgo , Factores Sexuales , Tomografía Computarizada por Rayos X
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