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1.
Construction Management and Economics ; 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2323235

ABSTRACT

Over the past 3 years, the global construction sector has been severely affected by the noxious coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Visionary construction stakeholders, including governments, practitioners, and academia, all have been actively devising strategies to deal with the crisis caused by the pandemic. Despite the rich contributions by academia, an in-depth review of their research works to understand how the pandemic has been handled to position the construction industry for post-pandemic actions and future pandemics is hitherto lacking. Hence, an up-to-date literature review is conducted in this study to better understand this terra incognita. It does so by adopting a six-step thematic analysis of 159 empirical peer-reviewed research articles in relation to COVID-19 on construction. The review discovered a growing research interest from different countries from 2020 to 2022. The existing studies can be put under four major topics, namely the COVID-19 impacts, challenges and opportunities, responding strategies, and post-COVID-19 interventions. A framework consisting of four categories of responding strategies, namely vaccination, personal responsibility of workers, government-instructional practices, and organisation-based approaches, is proposed through the lens of the socio-technical system theory to handle the pandemic crisis in construction. Limitations of the existing studies were further identified. Four pertinent research directions were finally proposed: building upon and testing the proposed COVID-19 response framework, adoption of more advanced innovative strategies to increase productivity amid pandemics and survive the risk of future pandemics, beyond the technological response to COVID-19 in construction, and post-pandemic view of the construction industry. This study contributes to the knowledge body by providing a candid evaluation of the knowledge contributed by academia to deal with the risks of future pandemics in the global construction industry. © 2023 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

2.
Archives of Disease in Childhood ; 106(Supplement 3):A23-A24, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2262550

ABSTRACT

In September 2020 the UK government announced Operation Moonshot;the remit being to increase testing capacity for COVID 19. Amongst the diagnostic platforms to be considered was mass spectrometry. To facilitate this the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) brought together and funded academic mass spectrometry (P1) and specialist NHS laboratories (P2) across the UK With regards to the latter the GOSH Enzyme Lab and the Neurometabolic Unit (National Hospital) were identified as a P2 grouping that would collaborate with the mass spectrometry unit at the UCL Institute of Child Health (P1 - Head Prof K Mills). This P1 lab developed a unique proteomic approach to measure diagnostic proteins associated with the SARS-CoV-2 virus This method was transferred over to our NHS labs for full validation. Rapid progress was made and the DHSC identified us as a 'vanguard lab'. Within 6 months of commencement of the project a validated method was developed that had excellent agreement with PCR testing Our data was used in presentations throughout the DHSC and for briefing of government ministers. Despite the pressures of the pandemic our NHS staff went above and beyond to deliver on time Furthermore close working with an academic partner provided a proof of principle example whereby state of the art mass spectrometry-based methods can successfully be translated across into the NHS environment.

3.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 29(4): 862-865, 2023 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2248116

ABSTRACT

To assess dynamics of SARS-CoV-2 in Greater Accra Region, Ghana, we analyzed SARS-CoV-2 genomic sequences from persons in the community and returning from international travel. The Accra Metropolitan District was a major origin of virus spread to other districts and should be a primary focus for interventions against future infectious disease outbreaks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Ghana/epidemiology , Biological Evolution , Disease Outbreaks
4.
Clin Chem Lab Med ; 2022 Nov 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2230715

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: During 2020, the UK's Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) established the Moonshot programme to fund various diagnostic approaches for the detection of SARS-CoV-2, the pathogen behind the COVID-19 pandemic. Mass spectrometry was one of the technologies proposed to increase testing capacity. METHODS: Moonshot funded a multi-phase development programme, bringing together experts from academia, industry and the NHS to develop a state-of-the-art targeted protein assay utilising enrichment and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to capture and detect low levels of tryptic peptides derived from SARS-CoV-2 virus. The assay relies on detection of target peptides, ADETQALPQRK (ADE) and AYNVTQAFGR (AYN), derived from the nucleocapsid protein of SARS-CoV-2, measurement of which allowed the specific, sensitive, and robust detection of the virus from nasopharyngeal (NP) swabs. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of LC-MS/MS was compared with reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) via a prospective study. RESULTS: Analysis of NP swabs (n=361) with a median RT-qPCR quantification cycle (Cq) of 27 (range 16.7-39.1) demonstrated diagnostic sensitivity of 92.4% (87.4-95.5), specificity of 97.4% (94.0-98.9) and near total concordance with RT-qPCR (Cohen's Kappa 0.90). Excluding Cq>32 samples, sensitivity was 97.9% (94.1-99.3), specificity 97.4% (94.0-98.9) and Cohen's Kappa 0.95. CONCLUSIONS: This unique collaboration between academia, industry and the NHS enabled development, translation, and validation of a SARS-CoV-2 method in NP swabs to be achieved in 5 months. This pilot provides a model and pipeline for future accelerated development and implementation of LC-MS/MS protein/peptide assays into the routine clinical laboratory.

5.
Research and Practice in Thrombosis and Haemostasis Conference ; 6(Supplement 1), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2128229

ABSTRACT

Background: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is often associated with enhanced platelet activation and thrombotic complications which may be reflected by altered microRNA (miRNA) levels in blood cells. Aim(s): We here investigated the expression of miRNAs in the background of platelet reactivity in severe COVID-19 and evaluated them for the prediction of disease mortality. Method(s): Platelet miRNAs were isolated from leukocyte-depleted platelets and profiled in COVID-19 survivors and non-survivors vs healthy controls using TaqMan Open Array. Candidate miRNAs showing at least 2-fold alteration between two groups were validated by RT-qPCR in 10 individuals from each group, and these data were correlated with clinical outcome in COVID-19. Differentially regulated miRNAs were bioinformatically analyzed to identify their mRNA targets and Cytoscape ClueGO was used for functional enrichment analysis. Platelet reactivity was evaluated via quantification of P-selectin expression, platelet-leukocyte aggregates and platelet-derived microparticles (PMPs) by flow cytometry. Result(s): Increased platelet activation was detected via elevated level of P-selectin positivity (6.5 vs 1.1%, P < 0.0001), platelet-monocyte aggregates (40 vs 17 %, P = 0.0315) and PMPs (22 vs 18 PMPs/10

6.
Archives of Disease in Childhood ; 106(Suppl 3):A23-A24, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1574518

ABSTRACT

In September 2020, the UK government announced Operation Moonshot;the remit being to increase testing capacity for COVID 19. Amongst the diagnostic platforms to be considered was mass spectrometry. To facilitate this, the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) brought together and funded academic mass spectrometry (P1) and specialist NHS laboratories (P2) across the UK.With regards to the latter, the GOSH Enzyme Lab and the Neurometabolic Unit (National Hospital) were identified as a P2 grouping that would collaborate with the mass spectrometry unit at the UCL Institute of Child Health (P1 – Head Prof K Mills). This P1 lab developed a unique proteomic approach to measure diagnostic proteins associated with the SARS-CoV-2 virus.This method was transferred over to our NHS labs for full validation. Rapid progress was made and the DHSC identified us as a ‘vanguard lab’. Within 6 months of commencement of the project, a validated method was developed that had excellent agreement with PCR testing.Our data was used in presentations throughout the DHSC and for briefing of government ministers. Despite the pressures of the pandemic, our NHS staff went above and beyond to deliver on time.Furthermore, close working with an academic partner provided a proof of principle example whereby state of the art mass spectrometry-based methods can successfully be translated across into the NHS environment.

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