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1.
Vayu Aerospace and Defence Review ; - (1):100-101, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1469146

ABSTRACT

Aligned with the Indian governments Atmanirbhar Bharat Abhiyaan and the Make in India initiative, we are participating in Aero India 2021 and reinforcing our commitment to supporting the growth of an indigenous defence manufacturing ecosystem while continuing to deliver our best capabilities to support the Indian MoD and Services, stated William (Bill) Blair, Vice President and Chief Executive, Lockheed Martin India. The MH-60R is the world's most advanced maritime helicopter and brings vital anti-submarine and anti-surface warfare capabilities to the Indo-Pacific region. [...]it is the largest contract Lockheed Martin has ever signed with India.

3.
Water ; 13(19):2756, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1468506

ABSTRACT

Bioelectrochemical technologies offer alternative ways of treating wastewater and using this process to generate electricity. However, research in this area is just beginning to consider environmental transmission of viruses present in wastewater. The viral fecal indicator coliphage MS2 (the most frequently used pathogen model) was used in this study, since it is a well-known indigenous wastewater virus. The scaled-up bioelectrochemical system had a working volume of 167 L and coliphage MS2 concentration decreased from 8000 to 285 PFU/mL. The kinetics were quantified up to 15 h, after which excessive yeast growth in the system prevented further bacteriophage determination. The logarithmic reduction value (LRV) calculated within the first three hours was 3.8. From 4 hours to 14, LRV values were from 4.1 to 4.8, and in hour 15 the LRV increased to 5.3, yielding a more than 90% reduction. Overall, results obtained indicate that the scaled-up bioelectrochemical treatment system was efficient in reducing coliphage MS2 densities and could be used as a model to explore its further applicability for the reduction of viruses or pathogens in treated effluents.

4.
School Psychology Review ; : 16, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1467213

ABSTRACT

In this article the authors advocate for a culturally responsible dual-factor model for the delivery of mental health services in the schools. This case is made because too many children are not receiving the mental health care they need in order to succeed in school and life. This is especially true for Black, Indigenous, children of color, and other minoritized youth. This transformative approach will require a dramatic change in how school psychological services are currently being delivered. The culturally responsible dual-factor model places a much greater emphasis on psychological well-being (as opposed to psychopathology), unwavering attention to rectifying discriminatory disparities in school mental health practices, an emphasis on population-based over individually focused mental health services, and a commitment to ensuring access for all children-not just those who are receiving special education services or 504 accommodations. This model is proactive and prevention oriented and focuses on equity. The case is presented that we continue to have a mental health crisis in today's youth with an increase in anxiety and depression. The authors conclude the article with implications for school psychology training, public policy and advocacy, and school-based practice. Impact Statement The culturally responsible dual-factor mental health framework is a transformative approach to school mental health services that is needed to address the nation's mental health crisis. It is needed because traditional approaches, models, and practices have been too narrow and, thus, continue to fail for diverse and minoritized children, families, and schools. A culturally responsible dual-factor mental health approach expands traditional approaches by emphasizing well-being, cultural strengths of minoritized communities, accessibility of services, and systems and structures (e.g., racism) that contribute to discrimination and disparities in mental health services.

5.
Journal of the Neurological Sciences ; 429, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1466669

ABSTRACT

Background and aims: Bacterial meningitis is a prevalent concern in low and middle-income countries, accounting for a high number of deaths and hospitalizations. This study aims to evaluate the epidemiology of hospitalizations for bacterial meningitis in Brazil during 2019 and 2020. Methods: Cross-sectional, descriptive and retrospective study, which evaluated the epidemiology of hospital admissions for bacterial meningitis in the Brazilian National Health System in the years 2019 and 2020. Hospital admissions were evaluated by sex, race and age group using the national database (DATASUS – Department of Informatics of the Unified Health System). Results: There was a total of 6921 hospitalizations for bacterial meningitis, being 4091 (59.1%) from 2019 and 2830 (40.9%) from 2020. In addition, 3922 (56.6%) patients were male and 2999 (43.4%) were female. Regarding race, 2421 (35%) considered themselves white, 2710 (39%) brown, 275 (4%) black, 130 (2%) yellow, 31 (0.5%) indigenous and 1354 (19.5%) did not have skin color informed. Regarding age groups;1156 (16.7%) were < 1 year old, 796 (11.5%) were 1–4, 560 (8.1%) were 5–9, 439 (6.3%) were 10–49, 426 (6.2%) were 15–19, 818 (11.8%) were 20–29, 730 (10.5%) were 30–39, 641 (9.3%) were 40–49, 625 (9%) were 50–59, 436 (6.3%) were 60–69, 209 (3%) were 70–79, 85 (1.3%) were > 80. Conclusions: The majority of patients hospitalized for bacterial meningitis disease were male, brown and < 1 year old. There was a decrease in hospital admissions for bacterial meningitis from 2019 to 2020, which may be related to the increased social isolation due to COVID-19.

6.
Journal of Anthropological Archaeology ; 64:101358, 2021.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1466429

ABSTRACT

Inhabiting the middle Purus river basin, a branch of the Amazon river, Arawá-speaking groups have maintained permanent contact with non-indigenous society only in the last century. Here we provide an account of two Arawá subgroups, the Jamamadi and Hi-Merimã, in order to untangle apparent contradictions between their ways of living, respectively based on the predominance of cultivated plants in gardens and of forest plants. This approach is inspired by three / tree scenarios: the Hi-Merimã’s isolation from indigenous and non-indigenous people undertaken in the 1960′s, the report of a “false contact” that they would have began in 2016 and the Jamamadi’s recent and perhaps temporary decision to move into the forest after knowledge of the Covid-19 pandemic. Besides the apparent distance between gardener and gatherer ways of life, we highlight the proximity and fluidity that both share in terms of entanglements with plants, focusing on forms of sociality between groups, gardens and forests. Inspired by recent discussions regarding archaeological perspectives on plant use, ethnographic formulations of other-than-human relations, and historical ecology, we propose that both are cultural and not necessarily static choices. One is contained within and announces the other, and both are entangled in an oscillating movement of fusion and fission.

7.
Rock Art Research ; 38(2):233-236, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1464511

ABSTRACT

Prof. Poani Higino Pimentel Tenório (24 March 1955 - 18 June 2020) was a brilliant Indigenous scholar and pedagogue. Sharing a deep Utapinopona ancestry, he was a son of the stone snake, also known as the Tuyuka people from the Tiquié River, an Upper Negro River tributary, Northwest Amazonia. Acknowledged as a Baya (a master of ceremonies) by some Tuyuka wise men, self-defined as a Kihti Masigu (historian), also recognised by some of his Indigenous students as a Kumu (philosopher-healer), he was a profoundly respected and internationally renowned Tuyuka educator. In 2017 he was acknowledged in Cusco, Peru, during the Second International Conference of Rock Art and Ethnography, as a relevant Indigenous rock art scholar from the Amazon, delivering a final honour lecture. One year later, during the biannual meeting of the Brazilian Rock Art Association (ABAR), he was acclaimed as the first Indigenous rock art researcher in this country and invited to become an honorary member of that organisation. Higino died of Covid-19 in the Brazilian Amazonia, aged 65, yet at the beginning of a prolific career as an epistemologist of Indigenous Education and Native Amazonian rock art research. Tragically, he shared the fate of thousands of Indigenous men, women, children, old and new generations of several tribal groups and linguistic families. Those in Brazil, besides the Sars-cov-2 virus, fell victim to a genocidal and fascistically inclined government that openly indulges and promotes a downplaying, negationist, and neglectful public health policy towards Covid-19 control, with devastating consequences, especially in Indigenous territories. 

9.
Am J Public Health ; : e1-e3, 2021 Oct 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468258

ABSTRACT

Indigenous populations have been disproportionally affected by COVID-19, particularly those in rural and remote locations. Their unique environments and risk factors demand an equally unique public health response. Our rural Native American community experienced one of the highest prevalence outbreaks in the world, and we developed an aggressive management strategy that appears to have had a considerable effect on mortality reduction. The results have implications far beyond pandemic response, and have reframed how our community addresses several complicated health challenges. (Am J Public Health. Published online ahead of print October 14, 2021:e1-e3. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2021.306472).

10.
Virol J ; 18(1): 203, 2021 Oct 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468069

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Chikungunya fever, caused by the Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), has become a major global health concern, causing unexpected large outbreaks in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas. CHIKV is not indigenous to China, and its origin in the country is poorly understood. In particular, there is limited understanding of the recent global spread of CHIKV in the context of the CHIKV epidemic. METHODS: Here we investigated a novel Chikungunya patient who came from Myanmar to China in August, 2019. Direct genome sequencing was performed via combined MinION sequencing and BGISEQ-500 sequencing. A complete CHIKV genome dataset, including 727 CHIKV genomes retrieved from GenBank and the genome sequenced in this study, was constructed. An updated and comprehensive phylogenetic analysis was conducted to understand the virus's origin, evolution, transmission routes and genetic adaptation. RESULTS: All globally distributed CHIKV genomes were divided into West Africa, East/Central/South African and Asian genotypes. The genome sequenced in this study was located in the Indian Ocean lineage, and was closely related to a strain isolated from an Australian patient who returned from Bangladesh in 2017. A comprehensive phylogenetic analysis showed that the Chinese strains mainly originated from the Indian subcontinent and Southeast Asia. Further analyses indicated that the Indian subcontinent and Southeast Asia may act as major hubs for the recent global spread of CHIKV, leading to multiple outbreaks and epidemics. Moreover, we identified 179 distinct sites, including some undescribed sites in the structural and non-structural proteins, which exhibited apparent genetic variations associated with different CHIKV lineages. CONCLUSIONS: Here we report a novel CHIKV isolate from a chikungunya patient who came from Myanmar to China in 2019, and summarize the source and evolution of Chinese CHIKV strains. Our present findings provide a better understanding of the recent global evolution of CHIKV, highlighting the urgent need for strengthened surveillance against viral diversity.

11.
Malaysian Journal of Public Health Medicine ; 21(2):348-358, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1464239

ABSTRACT

Globally, the minority indigenous peoples have a lower health status when compared with national populations. The Orang Asli who are indigenous peoples of Peninsular Malaysia, also pose a significant challenge towards the handling of diseases. The present study sought to synthesise a coherent explanation of health-seeking behaviour among Orang Asli using a mixed-method research approach. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 324 adult Orang Asli living in the rural district of Jelebu, in the Peninsular Malaysian state of Negeri Sembilan who conformed to the inclusion criteria. Then, 16 participants were interviewed to obtain an in-depth insight regarding their health-seeking behaviour. The findings showed that the majority of the Orang Asli utilized modern healthcare facilities and the respondents reported that the accessibility, services and medicines provided by the government were excellent. Meanwhile, 40.7% of the respondents relied on both traditional and modern treatments. The key determinants of the modern health-seeking behaviours among the Orang Asli in this study were satisfaction on modern health, barriers in getting health services, acceptance and attitude, and traditional medicine utilisation. Government, institutions and healthcare facilities have a role in ensuring that the vulnerable Orang Asli population is not left behind in receiving essential information on diseases associated with chronic and infectious diseases, including the current COVID-19 pandemic, as their action of seeking treatment remains complex and multi-layered. © 2021, Malaysian Journal of Public Health Medicine. All Right Reserved.

12.
Rural Remote Health ; 21(4): 7043, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1464161

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has devastated communities throughout the world and has required rapid paradigm changes in the manner in which health care is administered. Previous health models and practices have been modified and changed at a rapid pace. This commentary provides the experiences of a regional Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisation in a COVID-19 vaccination program led and managed by Aboriginal Health Practitioners.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , Community Health Services , Health Services, Indigenous , Physician's Role , Vaccination , COVID-19/ethnology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Community Health Services/organization & administration , Health Services, Indigenous/organization & administration , Humans , Oceanic Ancestry Group , Pandemics/prevention & control , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Victoria/epidemiology
13.
Learning Professional ; 42(3):46-49, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1459892

ABSTRACT

Within weeks of school building closings in spring 2020, it became clear to many educators that the fear and isolation experienced by students and educators would force changes to schooling in ways that will reverberate for a long time to come. Many educators were particularly concerned about students and communities of color that were already marginalized. In her conversations with education leaders, Jill Harrison Berg began asking: If change is inevitable, what can we do to ensure the change is for the better, especially for the students who haven't been well-served by schools? She wanted to learn how equity-minded education leaders are using this crisis as an opportunity to establish structures and create a culture that supports all students to get what they need to thrive. Among these inspiring conversations were several with Casey Sovo, a member of the Comanche Nation, 20-year educator, and Bureau of Indian Education program administrator in northern North Dakota. In discussion, Sovo made a strong case that now is the time for growing accomplished teachers by strengthening partnerships, making space for peer-led professional learning, and other strategies. He shared why these efforts are vital for Indigenous communities and how he is encouraging them in schools on the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians reservation. This article consists of excerpts from these conversations.

14.
Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement ; 25(3):125-134, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1459791

ABSTRACT

Community-engaged learning is being profoundly impacted by the global pandemic and racial reckoning that defines the COVID-19 reality. In order to best respond to this COVID-19 reality, community-engaged scholars and practitioners must draw on the knowledge ways produced by Black and Indigenous thinkers for which the intersection of pandemic and state violence is not new. By addressing the field’s assumptions of time and space and interrogating the accompanying practices of White adventure and the “real world” dichotomy, scholars and practitioners have the potential to create a community-engaged learning praxis that will thrive in the new normal created by the interplay of COVID-19 and the movement for Black lives. © Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement, Volume 25, Number 3, p. 125, (2021)

15.
Journal of Effective Teaching in Higher Education ; 4(1):1-17, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1459622

ABSTRACT

Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) suffer disproportionately from coronavirus-related illness, death, and financial loss. The aim of this retrospective, qualitative study was to better understand the experiences of BIPOC students at a Bronx-based public university during the COVID-19 pandemic. Data was collected from a reflective final exam in a health sciences course in May 2020. Responses (n = 28) were coded and analyzed using the Social Determinants of Health (SDH) framework. Several themes were identified in structural and intermediary determinant areas, including occupation, education, social cohesion, and psychosocial factors. Participants demonstrated optimism, resilience, and perseverance-protective factors against exposure to adverse SDH. Findings indicate that COVID-19 negatively impacted BIPOC students in multiple SDH areas which may have a compounding effect, hindering equity and justice. Providers of social and academic support are critical levers in addressing SDH barriers and helping students strengthen protective factors to reduce adverse impacts of health-damaging determinants.

16.
Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement ; 25(3):63-78, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1459610

ABSTRACT

This article focuses on the implications and creative possibility catalyzed by the COVID-19 pandemic and reinvigorated racial justice movement on infrastructure that seeks to build transformational community-engaged teaching and research partnerships. Pulling from existing literature around critical service-learning and the wisdom of scholars from the Black, Indigenous, person of color (BIPOC) community, we discuss how these lasting changes will advance our institution’s structures for responsible community engagement, as well as inform the field’s focus on antiracist community engagement. © Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement, Volume 25, Number 3, p. 63, (2021)

17.
Genes Immun ; 2021 Oct 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462002

ABSTRACT

The rapid expansion of coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 has impacted various ethnic groups all over the world. The burden of infectious diseases including COVID-19 are generally reported to be higher for the Indigenous people. The historical knowledge have also suggested that the indigenous populations suffer more than the general populations in the pandemic. Recently, it has been reported that the indigenous groups of Brazil have been massively affected by COVID-19. Series of studies have shown that many of the indigenous communities reached at the verge of extinction due to this pandemic. Importantly, South Asia also has several indigenous and smaller communities, that are living in isolation. Till date, despite the two consecutive waves in India, there is no report on the impact of COVID-19 for indigenous tribes. Since smaller populations experiencing drift may have greater risk of such pandemic, we have analysed Runs of Homozygosity (ROH) among South Asian populations and identified several populations with longer homozygous segments. The longer runs of homozygosity at certain genomic regions may increases the susceptibility for COVID-19. Thus, we suggest extreme careful management of this pandemic among isolated populations of South Asia.

18.
Vaccine ; 2021.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1458645

ABSTRACT

Background Vaccinating children (≤17 years old) is important for controlling the COVID-19 pandemic. As parents are primary decision makers for their children, we aimed to assess parents’ perceptions and intentions regarding COVID-19 vaccination for their children, including for some underserved populations (e.g., newcomers, Indigenous peoples, and visible minority groups). Methods We conducted a cross-sectional national survey of Canadian parents in December 2020, just as COVID-19 vaccines were approved for adults, to assess intention to vaccinate their children (aged 0-17 years) against COVID-19, perceptions of COVID-19 disease and vaccines, previous uptake of influenza and routine vaccines, and sociodemographic characteristics. Binomial logistic regression was used to assess the association between parents' COVID-19 vaccination intention for their children and exposure variables. Results Sixty-three percent of parents (1074/1702) intended to vaccinate their children against COVID-19. Those employed part-time (compared to full-time) had lower intention to vaccinate their children (aOR=1.73, 95% CI: 1.06-2.84), while those who spoke languages other than English, French, or Indigenous languages were less likely to have low intention (aOR=0.55, 95% CI: 0.32-0.92). Low vaccination intention was also associated with children not receiving influenza vaccine pre-pandemic (aOR=1.51, 95% CI: 1.04-2.21), parents having low intention to vaccinate themselves against COVID-19 (aOR=9.22, 95% CI: 6.43-13.34), believing COVID-19 vaccination is unnecessary (aOR=2.59, 95% CI: 1.72-3.91) or unsafe (aOR=4.21, 95% CI: 2.96-5.99), and opposing COVID-19 vaccine use in children without prior testing (aOR=3.09, 95% CI: 1.87-5.24). Interpretation Parents’ COVID-19 vaccination intentions for their children are better predicted by previous decisions regarding influenza vaccination than routine childhood vaccines, and other perceptions of COVID-19 vaccine-related factors. Public communication should highlight the safety and necessity of COVID-19 vaccination in children to support a return to normal activities. Further research should assess actual COVID-19 vaccination uptake in children, particularly for underserved populations.

19.
Journal of Neonatology ; 35(3):113-115, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1458172

ABSTRACT

Background: Healthcare workers (HCWs) are at greatest risk of acquiring infection in times of global pandemic of COVID-19 disease. There is an unprecedented demand of several forms of personal protective equipment (PPE) for HCWs leading to possible acute shortage of these equipment. This has paved way for development of local innovative PPEs. Objective: To test feasibility of a low cost, indigenous three-in-one face protective gear (FPG) in HCWs of a neonatal unit of a tertiary care institute in northern India. Methodology: A three-in-one FPG was developed using the commonly available items in a ward or intensive care and few trash items. Items used were sterile surgical sheet, cling wrap piece/transparency sheet, cover of umbilical catheter/any sterile hollow plastic pipe, or straw and adhesive tape. The FPG was tested in 17 HCWs regarding its ease to use, comfort, and feasibility with the help of questionnaire. Results: A total of 17 HCWs participated in this study. Majority (10, 58.8%) were doctors. Eight (47%) participants have never used any form of PPE previously. Thirteen (76.4%) participants found the FPG comfortable to wear;12 (70.5%) found it comfortable to wear up to 8 h. Three HCWs found it difficult to work when wear the FPG;1 out of 3 found it suffocating. Conclusion: Three-in-one FPG is an indigenous, low cost, and may be a feasible alternative in low-risk situations when there is scarcity of conventional protective equipment.

20.
Un análisis comparativo de las políticas públicas frente a la COVID-19 en las comunidades indígenas de México, Bolivia y Colombia. ; - (78):36-55, 2021.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1456498

ABSTRACT

The arrival and ongoing consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic during 2020 and 2021 have exacerbated issues related to processes such as globalization, transnational migration, and socioeconomic, educational, and territorial marginalization experienced by indigenous communities throughout Latin America. This article examines the ways in which the State has managed the pandemic in indigenous communities by analyzing individual case studies selected from three countries in the region (Mexico, Bolivia, and Colombia) where 2% or more of the general population have been categorized as "indigenous." The article explores the relationship between the State and native communities in order to understand the current sociopolitical dynamics throughout the region and to examine whether general patterns emerge regarding the State's ongoing responses to the continuing COVID-19 pandemic. (English) [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] Durante 2020 y 2021, la pandemia de la COVID-19 exacerbó situaciones sociales que ya estaban presentes entre las comunidades indígenas de América Latina, relacionadas con procesos como la globalización, la migración transnacional y la marginación socioeconómica y educativa. Este artículo examina la manera como los distintos Estados han manejado la pandemia en estas comunidades, a través del análisis de tres casos de la región (México, Bolivia y Colombia), donde al menos el 2% de la población se identifica como "indígena". El artículo explora la relación entre las políticas públicas implementadas en dichos grupos con el objetivo de entender las dinámicas sociopolíticas actuales de la región, así como la posible existencia de estrategias comunes entre los distintos Estados en la respuesta al coronavirus. (Spanish) [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] Durante 2020 e 2021, a pandemia ocasionada pela covid-19 intensificou situações sociais que já estavam presentes entre as comunidades indígenas da América Latina, relacionadas com processos como a globalização, a migração transnacional e a marginalização socioeconômica e educacional. Neste artigo, analisa-se a maneira como os diferentes Estados vêm conduzindo a pandemia nessas comunidades, por meio da análise de três casos da região (México, Bolívia e Colômbia), em que pelo menos 2% da população é identificada como "indígena". Além disso, explora-se a relação entre as políticas públicas implementadas nesses grupos com o objetivo de entender as dinâmicas sociopolíticas atuais da região, bem como a possível existência de estratégias comuns entre os Estados na resposta ao coronavírus. (Portuguese) [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Revista de Estudios Sociales is the property of Universidad de los Andes and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

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