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1.
IRCT; 2023-09-26; TrialID: IRCT20230125057216N1
Clinical Trial Register | ICTRP | ID: ictrp-IRCT20230125057216N1

ABSTRACT

Condition:

COVID-19.
COVID-19, virus identified;U07.1

Intervention:

Intervention 1: Intervention group: In the intervention group, 30 patients were treated with Curcumex, which is a combination of three ingredients (320 mg of turmeric, 150 mg of ginger, and 4 mg of black pepper) in capsule form. This drug was developed by the Department of Pharmacology of Jundishapur University of Ahvaz. this medication use twice daily, which lasts up to 30 days. During the treatment period, patients will have three visits for training and control of clinical symptoms and laboratory findings. Intervention 2: Control group: In the control group, 30 patients were treated with placebo, which was similar in appearance to the original drug. This drug was developed by the Department of Pharmacology of Jundishapur University of Ahvaz. this medication use twice daily, which lasts up to 30 days. During the treatment period, patients will have three visits for training and control of clinical symptoms and laboratory findings.

Primary outcome:

Investigation of the improvement rate of clinical symptoms of patients including cough, dyspnea, weakness, fever and diarrhea one month after take medication. Timepoint: At the beginning of the study and one month later. Method of measurement: history and physical examination.

Criteria:

Inclusion criteria: ground glass opacity in lung CT scan
Clinical symptoms such as dry cough- dyspnea-fever- weakness- diarrhea- headache-rhinorrhea- or history of contact with COVID19 patient or recent travel to high-risk areas
Positive Covid-19PCR

Exclusion criteria: PO intolerance
Dissatisfaction for Participation in research

2.
Food Production, Processing and Nutrition ; 5(1), 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20236119

ABSTRACT

Functional beverages originate primarily from fruits and vegetables sources, but also include those from other plants such as tea, coffee, cocoa, soybean as well as animal products like milk and dairy-based and alcoholic drinks. They have definite medical or health benefits which include prevention or delaying the progress of diseases. Indian gooseberry is a very rich source of vitamin C and phenolics, two potent antioxidant compounds. Similarly curcumin in turmeric, piperine in black pepper and gingerol in ginger have proven antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Incidence of covid-19 pandemic has raised awareness among people the importance of maintaining higher levels of immunity. A study was undertaken at Kerala Agricultural University during 2020–21 to develop an herbal functional drink from Indian gooseberry fruit juice incorporated with turmeric and black pepper powders, ginger juice extract and juice of acid lime fruits. The herbal drink formulated with these ingredients was homogenized at an operating pressure of 175 Bar with a speed of 235 SPM and was subsequently pasteurized at 100 0 C for 10 minutes in glass bottles, followed by storage under refrigerated conditions at 5 ± 2 0 C for 3 months. The initial ascorbic acid, total phenolics, total flavonoids, total carotenoids and total curcumin contents were 61.0 mg100g− 1, 184.0 mg100g− 1, 153.0 mg100g− 1, 119.98 mg100g− 1 and 31.0 mg100g− 1, respectively. Antioxidant activity of the herbal drink was determined by three assays, viz. ABTS, DDPH and FRAP. The initial IC 50 values of the herbal drink by ABTS, DPPH and FRAP assays were 8.64, 0.212 and 0.368 μgml− 1, respectively. Significant decline in ascorbic acid, total flavonoids, total carotenoids and curcumin content were recorded in the product during storage in contrast to the total phenolics content which showed a significant rise over the storage period. Antioxidant activity of the herbal drink determined by all the three assays also declined significantly throughout the storage period. The results indicate that the product can be promoted as a healthy drink which has to be stored at low temperature in order to retain higher levels of antioxidant compounds and antioxidant activity. Graphical : [Figure not available: see fulltext.] © 2023, The Author(s).

3.
American Journal of Gastroenterology ; 117(10 Supplement 2):S2026-S2027, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2324488

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is defined as hepatic dysfunction caused by prescription medications, supplements, or xenobiotics after alternative causes have been excluded. As one of the leading causes of acute liver failure, DILI should be considered when patients present with hepatic dysfunction. We present a case of symptomatic DILI secondary to artemisinin use. Case Description/Methods: A 78-year-old Chinese man with no medical history presented to the hepatology clinic with 10 weeks of jaundice, weakness, and pruritis. He started taking Artemisinin/ Bioperine 12 weeks ago to prevent COVID-19 but stopped 3 weeks ago. He denied abdominal pain, a family history of liver disease, substance/alcohol use, and taking other concomitant drugs. Physical examination revealed scleral icterus and no other signs of chronic liver disease. Laboratory studies showed total bilirubin 11 mg/dL, alkaline phosphatase 293 U/L, aspartate transaminase 170 U/L, and alanine transaminase 196 U/L with negative workup for hepatitis A, B, and C. CT abdomen and MRCP were unremarkable for liver or biliary pathology. Further serological workup was negative and follow-up labs revealed normalization of liver enzymes and bilirubin. Given the patient's improvement, liver biopsy was not pursued. The patient was instructed to avoid supplements unless prescribed by a physician. Discussion(s): DILI is a global issue with an estimated annual incidence rate of 13.9 to 24.0 per 100,000 persons. Diagnosing DILI is important as it can cause acute liver injury and liver failure in certain cases. Since COVID-19 emerged, supplement use has increased given claims of boosting the immune system. Artemisinin is an herb used in traditional Chinese medicine with antimalarial activity investigated to be a possible COVID-19 treatment, but no current evidence exists to support it being effective against COVID-193. Our patient's supplement also contained Bioperine, a black pepper extract, which is likely benign. Contrarily, artemisinin is a well-described cause of idiosyncratic acute liver injury and hepatotoxicity, causing self-limited mild to moderate transaminitis but also severe cases requiring emergent livertransplantation. Our patient's unrevealing workup, his spontaneous improvement correlating with supplement discontinuation, and RUCAM score of 7 led to high suspicion of DILI secondary to artemisinin. Providers should always ask patients about supplement use and consider DILI when patients present with liver injury. (Table Presented).

4.
Journal of the Chilean Chemical Society ; 67(3):5656-5661, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2326837

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) began in Wuhan, China, in December 2019 and quickly spread across the worldwide. It becomes a global pandemic and risk to the healthcare system of almost every nation around the world. In this study thirty natural compounds of 19 Indian herbal plants were used to analyze their binding with eight proteins associated with COVID -19. Based on the molecular docking as well as ADMET analysis, isovitexin, glycyrrhizin, sitosterol, and piperine were identified as potential herbal medicine candidates. On comparing the binding affinity with Ivermectin, we have found that the inhibition potentials of the Trigonella foenum-graecum (fenugreek), Glycyrrhiza glabra (licorice), Tinospora cordifolia (giloy) and Piper nigrum (black pepper) are very promising with no side-effects.

5.
Urologia ; 90(3): 499-502, 2023 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2296046

ABSTRACT

Different strategies have been proposed to treat cytokine storm syndrome (CSS), the final deadly complication of COVID-19. One approach is to target CSS by blocking the interleukin-6 (IL-6) pathway. A promising group of medications blocking the IL-6 pathway is α-blockers, such as prazosin. First, we hypothesized that Panax ginseng, commonly known as ginseng, can be an effective therapeutic agent in preventing CSS due to its blocking activity on alpha-1 adrenergic receptors (α1-AR). Furthermore, we suggested that herbs with 5α-reductase inhibitory effects, such as Saw palmetto, Nettle root, soya, black pepper, and green tea, can have debilitating impacts on pulmonary function since they can lead to impairment of the lung's ability to regenerate. Thus, we encourage the prospective studies to explore the potential effect of herbal medications, with possible beneficial effects for benign prostatic hyperplasia, during the COVID-19 pandemic since they are commonly consumed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Prostatic Hyperplasia , Male , Humans , Prostatic Hyperplasia/complications , Prostatic Hyperplasia/drug therapy , Interleukin-6/therapeutic use , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Adrenergic alpha-Antagonists/therapeutic use
6.
Agricultural Situation in India ; 79(9):33-42, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2277534

ABSTRACT

The consumption of spices is growing in India with an increase in purchasing power. It is forecasted that everyone in the country would be consuming one spice or the other with a high per capita consumption. It is estimated that we may have a population of around 1.69 billion people during 2050 and approximately the per capita consumption of turmeric, ginger, black pepper and cardamom is expected to be about 1.6 kg, 1.2 kg, 148 g and 54 g, respectively. This may increase further owing to rapid urbanization which needs spices as natural food preservatives. Hence, the present study was conducted to analyze the growth trend in spices economy of India during the period 1990-91 to 2021-22 with reference to the selected growth indicators such as area, production, domestic market, export and export value. For estimating the acceleration in the growth rates, the paper uses semi-logarithmic specification of a non-linear (quadratic) equation. From the analysis, it is observed that there is a huge scope for output and export of spices. Despite the Covid pandemic, spices export from India has continued its upward trend during 2020-21 and has attained an all-time high of US $ 4.0 billion mark for the first time in the history of spices export. It also implies that there is strong domestic market for spices in India.

7.
J Biomol Struct Dyn ; : 1-11, 2021 Aug 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2287339

ABSTRACT

Corona Virus Disease (COVID-19) caused by Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a pandemic that has claimed so far over half a million human life across the globe. Researchers all over the world are exploring various molecules including phytochemicals to get a potential anti-COVID-19 drug. Certain phytochemicals present in some spices are claimed to possess antiviral, anti-bacterial, and anti-fungal properties. Hence, an in-silico study was done by selecting eighteen well reported antiviral phytochemicals from some spices commonly used in Indian kitchen viz. Curcuma longa (Turmeric), Nigella sativa (Black cumin), Piper nigrum (Black pepper), Trachyspermum ammi (Carom) and Zingiber officinale (Ginger) to find out whether they can prevent SARS-CoV-2 infection. Firstly, we predicted the structure of TMPRSS2 (transmembrane protease serine 2), a host protein that truncates spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 thereby facilitating its endocytosis, and then docked against its catalytic domain the selected phytochemicals and camostat (a well-known synthetic inhibitor of TMPRSS2). Thereafter, stability of seven best docked phytochemicals and camostat were scrutinized by Molecular Dynamic Simulation (MDS). MDS analysis indicated bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC), carvacrol and thymol as better inhibitors than the camostat due to their stable binding with TMPRSS2 in its oxyanion hole and inducing subtle modification in the spatial arrangement of the catalytic triad residues. Among these three phytochemicals, carvacrol appeared to be the best inhibitor, followed by BDMC, whereas thymol was least effective.Communicated by Ramaswamy H. Sarma.

8.
Medicinal Plants ; 15(Supplement 1):71-72, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2218592

ABSTRACT

Phytomedicines are plant derived substances used for medicinal purposes with great potential and abundance. Spices have a traditional history of use as natural products that have been extensively used worldwide in healthrelated problems as well as medicinal purposes such as in enhancing immunity and providing numerous health benefits. The major spices such as small cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum Maton), pepper (Piper nigrum L.), ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc), turmeric (Curcuma longa L), cumin (Cuminum cyminum L), mustard (Brassica nigra L) and fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) are playing important roles in phytomedicine to cure various human diseases. The active ingredients of spices which includes cardamom (1,8-cineole, alpha-terpinyl acetate, sabinene and beta-linalool), pepper (piperine), ginger (Gingerol, shogaol and zerumbone), turmeric(curcumin) and cumin (cumin aldehyde, eugenol, pinene, phenolic acids). Cardamom is coined as Queen of spices and is used for medicinal purposes both in modern and indigenous systems. Cardamom essential oil has antioxidant, antiseptic, carminative, digestive, diuretic, stimulant, stomachic, tonic, antispasmodic, anti-diabetic, antimicrobial, antiinflammatory, anti-cancer, gastroprotective and insecticidal properties. It is also used as an aphrodisiac. It is helpful in reducing the irritation endured during premenstrual strain. It works well against respiratory trouble thus helping to ease coughs and to warm up the body. The seeds of cardamom are considered to be stimulant, carminative, stomachic, diuretic, cardiotonic and abortifacient. They are useful in treating bronchitis, haemorrhoids, strangury, renal and vesical calculi, anorexia, dyspepsia and gastropathy. They are chewed to prevent bad breath and pyrosis i.e. excessive watering in the mouth. Adding powdered cardamom seeds can impart a very pleasant aroma to the tea, which is also used as medicine for scanty urination, diarrhoea, palpitation of the heart, exhaustion due to overwork and depression among other things. Pepper is often referred to as King of spices' 'and has anticancer, antimicrobial, anti- inflammatory and antiglycan properties. The antioxidant activity of black pepper comes from alkaloid-derived piperine which inhibits free radicals and reactive oxygen species, reduces lipid peroxidation and positively affects antioxidant molecules, antioxidant enzymes and cellular thiol status. Ginger is a rhizomatic spice crop containing various phenolic substances and antioxidant compounds in addition to the antioxidant properties, these compounds have antiglycan activity and other potential antidiabetic effects. In addition to this, Gingerol, shogaol and zerumbone are bioactive compounds of ginger. Gingerol is the most effective compound that has an antidiabetic activity and increases glucose uptake. Ginger is widely used for dyspepsia, flatulence, abdominal discomfort, nausea and as astringent (an agent that causes shrinkage of mucous membranes or exposed tissues and that is often used internally to check discharge of blood serum or mucous secretions) used as an alternative medicine for the inflammation treatment, low back pain and also used to treat acute tonsillitis. Turmeric is also preferred as an anti-inflammatory agent in traditional medicine for the treatment of skin disorders, wounds, digestive and liver problems. Turmeric is especially valuable for curcumin, which is one of the main components of turmeric. Curcumin together with other related pigments, gives the plant a yellow color. Chemically, these pigments are polyphenols, which are called curcuminoids. Curcumin is shown to have potential antihyperglycemic, antioxidant and immunomodulatory effects. As a traditional remedy, turmeric has also been quite extensively used for centuries to treat various disorders such as rheumatism, body ache, skin diseases, intestinal worms, diarrhoea, intermittent fevers, hepatic diseases, urinary discharges, dyspepsia, inflammations, constipation, leukoderma, amenorrhea, dental diseases, digestive problem such as dy pepsia and acidity, indigestion, flatulence, ulcers and colic inflammatory disorders such as arthritis, colitis and hepatitis. The spice crop, mustard has various bio active compounds containing carotenes, phenolic substances such as quercetin and kaempferol. Among these compounds glucosinolates have been recognized as potential anticancer agents. Cumin contains cumin aldehyde, eugenol, pinene and some other small compounds in cumin oil are active antimicrobial agents against pathogens. In addition, cumin seeds are rich in phenols and flavonoids and contain a wide spectrum of phenolic acids such as galial, cinnamic, rosmarinic, cumaric and vanillic acids. Cumin seeds are used for the treatment of dyspepsia and diarrhoea especially because of the active compound called cuminaldehyde. It is also believed that it is also used for the treatment of diabetes. Fenugreek is used as an aphrodisiac, astringent, demulcent action, carminative, stomachic, diuretic, emmenagogue, emollient, expectorant, restorative and tonic. Fenugreek also used for a variety of health situations including digestive disorders, bronchitis, tuberculosis infection, fevers, sore throat, arthritis, abscesses, swollen glands, skin irritations reaction, loss of appetite, ulcers and menopausal symptoms, diabetes as well as in the treatment of cancerous infection. Leaves infusion is used as a gargle for treatment of mouth ulcers. It also overcomes problem related to reduce blood sugar level and to lower blood pressure. In the recent Covid-19 pandemic, the mixed extracts of spices such as pepper, cardamom, clove, turmeric and ginger were found effective in reducing the Covid-19 pandemic due to the antiviral properties of these spices.

9.
International Journal of Ayurvedic Medicine ; 13(3):699-705, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2167728

ABSTRACT

Background & Objectives: The recovery and mortality statistics for COVID-19 first wave considerably differed in different states & Union territories (UT) of India. Spices are an essential part of Indian cuisine. Apart from adding flavors and colors to the food, their importance is traditionally known in disease prevention and cure. Thus, present study was carried out to assess relation of spice consumption with COVID-19 first wave statistics in India. Methods: The spice consumption data of ginger, garlic, cumin, coriander, turmeric, black pepper, chili, tamarind and 'other spices' were retrieved from 'Household Consumption of Various Goods and Services in India' from 68th round (2011-12) of survey conducted by National Sample Survey Organization (NSSO). The first wave data for individual states and UTs were retrieved as total number of cases, number of cured/discharged/migrated cases and total number of deaths, in a cumulative normalized form. The correlation of these was analyzed. Results and Conclusions: Spices were consumed across India with a varied range. The highest consumed spice was ginger. The highest consumption of 'Other spices' were observed in Lakshadweep (149 gm/30 days), which incidentally reported zero cases. Tamarind had positive correlation (r = 0.4724) with total number of cases and recovered/migrated/cured cases (r = 0.4948). Cumin consumption exhibited weak positive correlation (r = 0.5011) with total deaths per million population. However, most of these correlations were statistically insignificant. These findings can help to predict preventive/mitigating or curative usage of these spices. The unspecified and under-explored 'Other spices' category showed promising correlation.

10.
Journal of Drug Research in Ayurvedic Sciences ; 7(3):192-199, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2119039

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) has emerged as a challenge for health-care systems worldwide. Presently for the management and treatment of COVID-19, efficacy of therapeutic drugs is uncertain. Ayurvedic products and decoctions as immunity boosters might help combat this dreaded pandemic. The aim of the present study was to explore the prevalence of consumption of natural products and Ayurvedic decoctions “kadha” as immunity-boosting measures during the initial phase of COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: An online survey was undertaken on the usage of immunity-boosting measures and Ayurvedic decoctions “kadha” among the adult residents of Delhi belonging to different age groups. RESULTS: A total of 540 responses were included with a mean age of 25.9 ± 9.8 years. Approximately, 76% of the study participants used kadha as an immunity booster during COVID-19 pandemic. Among the participants who consumed kadha, approximately 94% were preparing the kadha at home. The most common ingredients being used in the preparation of kadha were Shunthi (ginger)—Zingiber officinale Roscoe (91.0%), Tulsi (holy basil)—Ocimum tenuiflorum L. (88.6%), Kali mirch (black pepper)—Piper nigrum L. (80.5%), Laung (clove)—Syzygium aromaticum (L.) Merr. & L.M. Perry (77.4%), and Dalchini (cinnamon)—Cinnamomum verum J. Presl (67.2%). With regard to the frequency of consumption of kadha, 32.1% of the participants consumed kadha once daily, whereas 26.8% consumed on alternative days. CONCLUSION: This study highlights the trust and conviction in traditional Indian herbs as well as condiments for combating infections including COVID-19 through Ayurvedic practices.

11.
Annals of Phytomedicine-an International Journal ; 11:64-71, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2121617

ABSTRACT

Ayurveda is a traditional medicine that was used under numerous copious of medicine to cure and prevent various diseases. The sudden outbreak of coronavirus which was a major threat to life came into existence in 2020 and had an adverse effect on the immune system of the people, so to fight against coronavirus various home remedies were consumed as an immunity booster during COVID-19. The survey was conducted to study the practices of using home remedies by middle-aged people (40-60) as in this period, the aginge process started which causes a decline in the competence of immune function to fight against the virus. It was conducted on 120 subjects, of which 60 males and 60 females were selected of Udaipur city, Rajasthan. A well-structured questionnaire was developed and the data was collected randomly on the ease of availability of the subjects. From the findings, it was concluded that the (75%) majority of middle-aged people consumed home remedies;the major spices and herbs consumed were Tulsi, Giloy, Turmeric, Black pepper, and Ginger and most of them have partaken in the form of Kadha and Turmeric milk on sometimes basis, whereas other Ayurveda rasayana consumed was Chyawanprash and other than spices and herbs, vitamin C and probiotic foods were also consumed during COVID-19 to keep the immune system healthy.

12.
Journal of the Chilean Chemical Society ; 67(3):5656-5661, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2092177

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) began in Wuhan, China, in December 2019 and quickly spread across the worldwide. It becomes a global pandemic and risk to the healthcare system of almost every nation around the world. In this study thirty natural compounds of 19 Indian herbal plants were used to analyze their binding with eight proteins associated with CO VID-19. Based on the molecular docking as well as ADMET analysis, isovitexin, glycyrrhizin, sitosterol, and piperine were identified as potential herbal medicine candidates. On comparing the binding affinity with Ivermectin, we have found that the inhibition potentials of the Trigonella foenum-graecum (fenugreek), Glycyrrhiza glabra (licorice), Tinospora cordifolia (giloy) and Piper nigrum (black pepper) are very promising with no side-effects.

13.
11th IGRSM International Conference and Exhibition on Geospatial and Remote Sensing, IGRSM 2022 ; 1064, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1989220

ABSTRACT

The proceedings contain 55 papers. The topics discussed include: monitoring of black pepper growth at different elevation using ground data and NDVI time series;assessment of heavy metals and nutrients availability in oil palm plantation effected by bauxite mining using geostatistical and multivariate analyses;monitoring green biomass utilizing remote sensing techniques for agriculture and forest areas in East Malaysia;a review of GIS spatiotemporal analysis and web-based mapping for COVID-19;plastic waste mapping and monitoring using geospatial approaches;monitoring of mangroves changes in Pulau Kukup using geographical information system (GIS);smartphone distance measurement application using image processing methods;production of drone orthomosaic map of UTHM wetland conservation research station using UAV photogrammetry;and terrain mapping for the southwestern desert of Iraq using interferometry method from Sentinel-1A images.

14.
Biomed Pharmacother ; 153: 113456, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1966381

ABSTRACT

Dexamethasone acts as an immunosuppressive drug and has been used recently in the management of specific coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases; however, various adverse effects could limit its use. In this work, we studied the mitigation effects of black pepper oil (BP oil) on glycemic parameters, dyslipidemia, oxidative and nitrosative stress and pancreatic fibrosis in dexamethasone-treated rats. Animals were divided into five groups that were treated with vehicle, dexamethasone (10 mg/kg, SC) or black pepper oil (BP oil, 0.5 mL, or 1 mL/kg) or metformin (50 mg/kg) plus dexamethasone for 4 consecutive days. Serum insulin, blood glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, and Homeostatic Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) were higher in the dexamethasone group vs the control group and decreased in BP oil and metformin groups relative to the dexamethasone group. Pancreatic nitric oxide, inducible nitric oxide synthase and malondialdehyde levels were increased in the dexamethasone group vs the control group and decreased in BP oil and metformin groups relative to the dexamethasone group. Pancreatic endothelial nitric oxide synthase and reduced glutathione were declined in the dexamethasone group vs the control group. They were increased in BP oil and metformin groups relative to the dexamethasone group. Moreover, the pancreatic islets diameter and collagen deposition were assessed and found to be higher in the dexamethasone group vs the control group. BP oil and metformin groups showed to regress this effect. In conclusion, BP oil may alleviate hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and pancreatic structural derangements and fibrosis by suppressing oxidative stress, increasing endogenous antioxidant levels, modulating nitric oxide signaling, preventing pancreatic stellate cells transition and collagen deposition.


Subject(s)
Dexamethasone , Metformin , Pancreas , Piper nigrum , Plant Oils , Animals , Blood Glucose , Dexamethasone/adverse effects , Dexamethasone/pharmacology , Dyslipidemias/drug therapy , Fibrosis , Insulin Resistance , Metformin/pharmacology , Nitric Oxide/metabolism , Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II/drug effects , Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II/metabolism , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , Pancreas/drug effects , Pancreas/pathology , Piper nigrum/chemistry , Plant Oils/pharmacology , Plant Oils/therapeutic use , Rats , Rats, Wistar , COVID-19 Drug Treatment
15.
Gastroenterology ; 162(7):S-1284, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1967448

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Turmeric (curcumin) is a commonly used over-the-counter herbal product whose uses include diarrhea, arthritis, cancer and even COVID-19. Recently turmeric has been implicated in cases of clinically apparent liver injury with jaundice. The aim of this case series is to describe the clinical, histologic and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) associations of turmeric-associated hepatotoxicity as seen in the U.S. Drug Induced Liver Injury Network (DILIN) Prospective Study. METHODS: All adjudicated cases enrolled in DILIN between 2003-2020 with turmeric as an implicated product were reviewed. Causality was assessed using a 5-point expert opinion score. Available products were collected and analyzed for the presence of turmeric using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography. Genetic analyses included HLA sequencing. RESULTS: Of 1697 cases of drug-induced liver injury judged to be definite, highly likely or probable (high confidence), nine (0.5%) were attributed to turmeric, all of which were enrolled since 2012, and 6 since 2017 (Figure). The 9 cases included 7 women, 8 whites, with a mean age of 51 years (range, 35-62 years) and BMI 25 kg/m2 (range, 15-40). Seven patients used alcohol, but none to excess, and none had underlying liver disease. Turmeric was used for an average of 102 days before onset of injury (range, 30-425 days). Initial mean ALT was 1179 U/L (range, 328-2245), ALP 211 U/L (41-441), total bilirubin 5.9 mg/dL (1.2-10.8), and INR 1.0 (0.9-1.2). Six patients developed jaundice, and serum bilirubin peaked at 9.6 mg/dL (0.8-26), and INR 2.3 (1.0- 9.7). Liver injury was hepatocellular in 8 patients (mean R = 22). Five patients had elevated antinuclear antibody (ANA) titer and two anti-smooth muscle (ASM) antibody, but none were treated with corticosteroids. Liver biopsy in 5 patients showed portal and lobular mixed inflammatory infiltrates with lymphocytes and eosinophils typical of drug-induced liver injury. Five patients were hospitalized, and one patient died of acute liver failure. Chemical analysis confirmed the presence of turmeric in all 7 products analyzed;3 also contained piperine (black pepper), and none contained green tea. Of 7 patients with HLA typing available, 4 carried HLA-B*35:01, a class I HLA allele previously implicated in both green tea and Polygonum multiflorum hepatotoxicity. CONCLUSION: Liver injury due to turmeric appears to be increasing, perhaps, reflecting usage patterns or increased combination with black pepper, which increases its absorption. Turmeric liver injury, similar to that caused by other polyphenolic herbal products, is typically hepatocellular, with a latency of 1 to 6 months, and is linked to HLA-B*35:01. While most cases are self-limited, the injury can be severe and result in death or liver transplantation.

16.
IOP Conference Series. Earth and Environmental Science ; 1064(1):012001, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1960954

ABSTRACT

Implementation of remote sensing in agriculture helps to enhance crop growth monitoring especially during the Covid-19 pandemic. To enhance black pepper growth condition, a study was conducted at two study sites in Bintulu, Sarawak. Hence, this study aims (i) to construct a black pepper growth monitoring at different levels of elevation in Suka Farm (SF) and Taime Farm (TF);and (ii) to integrate limited ground data and NDVI time series from Landsat 8OLI for black pepper growth monitoring. Elevation maps were generated using Natural Neighbor (NN) based on the ground data analysed using ArcGIS 10.4 Software. Three elevation levels were classified into the lower, middle, and upper levels. Observational ground data and NDVI time series of Landsat 8 OLI were calculated using SAS 9.4 software. All parameters then correlating with the elevation levels using Pearson Correlation Coefficient. Optimum growth of black pepper growth in SF and TF was identified at an elevation range between 39m–50m. The NDVI time series also indicated equivalent results as the ground data. This study proposed that the elevation of an area gives a significant impact on black pepper growth. Besides, the NDVI time series of Landsat 8 OLI was feasible for monitoring black pepper growth.

17.
Journal of the Indian Chemical Society ; : 100640, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1926649

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has quickly spread across the globe, becoming a pandemic. This disease has a variable impact in different countries depending on their cultural norms, mitigation efforts and health infrastructure. This study aims to assess the herbal plants in the pursuit of potential SARS-CoV-2 Mpro inhibitors using in silico approaches. We have considered 16 extracted compounds of 10 different species of these plants. In order to explain their inhibition properties and chemical reactivity pattern, we have performed the density functional theory based calculations of frontier molecular orbitals, molecular electrostatic potential surface and chemical reactivity descriptors. Our calculated lipophilicity, aqueous solubility and binding affinity of the extracted compounds suggest that the inhibition potentials in the order;harsingar > aloe vera > giloy > turmeric > neem > ginger > red onion > tulsi > cannabis > black pepper. On comparing the binding affinity with hydroxychloroquine, we note that the inhibition potentials of the extracts of harsingar, aloe vera and giloy are very promising. In order to validate this, we have also performed MD simulation and MM-PBSA binding free energy analysis. Therefore, we believe that these findings will open further possibilities and accelerate the works towards finding an antidote for this malady.

18.
International Journal of Phytomedicine ; 12(2):35-41, 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1897033

ABSTRACT

Ayurveda and Siddha systems are the two ancient medical systems originated in India more than 4000 years ago had given many formulary and treatment methods against influenza like infections. Kabasura churan from Siddha system and Maha sudharshan churan from the Ayurvedic system are the two major formulations along with many other individual herbs mentioned in the texts to treat Influenza like infections. Kabasura churan and Maha Sudarshan churan both have antipyretic, analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects. Both formulations were prepared according to Siddha and Ayurvedic texts. Herbs mentioned in both formulations like Turmeric, Tulsi (Basil), Kalmegh (Andrographis), Black Pepper, Liquorice (Mulethi), and Dronapushpi (Leucas) etc., had direct antiviral effect. Herbs like Aswagandha, Ginger, Guduchi (Tinospora), Kulanjan (Galangal) etc., had immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effect. Active compounds from different herbs were selected to study their antiviral activity through molecular docking algorithm. Application of modern of tools like Bioinformatics and Highthroughput screening methods can predict the efficacy of the ancient documented formulations and can be compared as per their literature. Compounds like curcumin, Glycyrrhizin, Ursolic acid, Quercetin, Andrographolide, Coumarins etc. were showed polyspecific activity like inhibition of Spike protein, Furin, Main Protease (Mpro) and Papain like Proteases (PLpro). Thus we propose use of Kabasura churan and Maha Sudharshan churan as alternative complementary medicine as a palliative treatment against COVID-19 caused by SARS-CoV-2 by conducting proper Randomized Clinical Trials.

19.
medrxiv; 2022.
Preprint in English | medRxiv | ID: ppzbmed-10.1101.2022.06.08.22275684

ABSTRACT

Background & Objectives: The recovery and mortality statistics for COVID-19 first wave considerably differed in different states & Union territories (UT) of India. Though dependent on several factors, relation of diet and immunity is well-established. Spices are an essential part of Indian cuisine. Apart from adding flavors and colors to the food, their importance has been traditionally known in disease prevention and cure. Thus, present study was carried out to assess relation of spice consumption with COVID-19 first wave statistics in India. Methods: The spice consumption data were retrieved from Household Consumption of Various Goods and Services in India from 68th round (2011-12) of survey conducted by National Sample Survey Organization (NSSO). Spices for which, consumption data was available, viz., ginger (Zingiber officinale), garlic (Allium sativum), cumin (Cuminum cyminum), coriander (Coriandrum sativum), turmeric (Curcuma longa), black pepper (Piper nigrum), chili (Capsicum annuuam), tamarind (Tamarandus indica) and other spices were selected for analysis. The COVID-19 first wave data for individual states and UTs were retrieved as total number of cases, number of cured/discharged/migrated cases and total number of deaths due to COVID-19, in a cumulative form. It was normalized per million population of respective states and UT. The correlation of individual spice consumption and COVID-19 statistics was analyzed. Results and Conclusions: Spices were consumed across all India with a varied range. The highest consumed spice was ginger. Its highest consumption was in Mizoram (185 gm/30 days) and least in Jammu & Kashmir (23gm/30 days). The highest consumption of Other spices were observed in Lakshadweep (149 gm/30 days), which incidentally reported zero COVID-19 cases. Tamarind consumption showed positive correlation (r = 0.4724) with total number of cases per million population, recovered/migrated/cured cases (r = 0.4948). The consumption of cumin exhibited a weak positive correlation (r = 0.5011) with total deaths per million population. However, most of these correlations were statistically insignificant. The findings from this study provide a basic framework and understanding for future studies. These findings can help to predict preventive/ mitigating or curative usage of these spices. Should similar scenario occur in future, these findings can provide some vital base to act as adjuvant management. As the unspecified and under-explored Other spices category showed promising correlation, more attention needs to be given to them too, along with mostly studied spices like ginger and turmeric.

20.
J Ayurveda Integr Med ; 13(1): 100350, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1838945

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection associated respiratory disease- COVID-19 has evolved into a pandemic but, being a new form of virus, pathogenesis of disease causation is not fully understood and drugs and vaccines against this virus are still being tested so that no effective drugs or vaccines have been advised by regulatory authority. In this context, the Ministry of AYUSH, Government of India has recommended 'Ayush Kwath' to improve the immunity and combat the infection. Our objective of this literature review is to review the role of immunity in pathogenesis of COVID-19 and role of Ayush Kwath against the virus and regulation of immunity. Current review was conducted using a search of available literature on COVID-19 and immunity, Vyadhikshamatwa, Ayurveda and COVID-19, Rasayana, Coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, immunomodulatory effects of medicinal plants; Tulsi/Holy Basil/Ocimum sanctum, Dalchini/Cinnamon/Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Sunthi/Ginger/Zingiber officinale and Marich/Black Pepper/Piper nigrum. Ayurveda, being an ancient science have both medicinal and cultural values and had stimulated our kitchen and influenced what we ate in different seasons and the remedies we used for common ailments. Herbs such as Tulsi, Marich, Sunthi, Dalchini are the most commonly used and easily available drugs in home. Thus, Ayush Kwath due to its immune-modulatory, antiviral, anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-platelet, anti-atherosclerotic, hepato-protective, reno-protective properties; seems to be effective in immuno-regulation for controlling viral infections like COVID-19. Further pre-clinical and clinical trials need to be done for the evaluation of safety and efficacy of this polyherbal formulation.

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