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The Social Brain and Emotional Contagion: COVID-19 Effects.
Valenzano, Anna; Scarinci, Alessia; Monda, Vincenzo; Sessa, Francesco; Messina, Antonietta; Monda, Marcellino; Precenzano, Francesco; Mollica, Maria Pina; Carotenuto, Marco; Messina, Giovanni; Cibelli, Giuseppe.
  • Valenzano A; Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Foggia, 71122 Foggia, Italy.
  • Scarinci A; Department of Education Sciences, Psychology, and Communication, University of Bari, 70121 Bari, Italy.
  • Monda V; Department of Experimental Medicine, Section of Human Physiology and Unit of Dietetics and Sports Medicine, Università degli Studi della Campania "Luigi Vanvitelli", 80100 Naples, Italy.
  • Sessa F; Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Foggia, 71122 Foggia, Italy.
  • Messina A; Department of Experimental Medicine, Section of Human Physiology and Unit of Dietetics and Sports Medicine, Università degli Studi della Campania "Luigi Vanvitelli", 80100 Naples, Italy.
  • Monda M; Department of Experimental Medicine, Section of Human Physiology and Unit of Dietetics and Sports Medicine, Università degli Studi della Campania "Luigi Vanvitelli", 80100 Naples, Italy.
  • Precenzano F; Clinic of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, Department of Mental Health, Physical and Preventive Medicine, Università degli Studi della Campania "Luigi Vanvitelli", 80100 Naples, Italy.
  • Mollica MP; Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Naples, 80138 Naples, Italy.
  • Carotenuto M; Clinic of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, Department of Mental Health, Physical and Preventive Medicine, Università degli Studi della Campania "Luigi Vanvitelli", 80100 Naples, Italy.
  • Messina G; Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Foggia, 71122 Foggia, Italy.
  • Cibelli G; Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Foggia, 71122 Foggia, Italy.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 56(12)2020 Nov 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1024601
Semantic information from SemMedBD (by NLM)
1. Social Interaction PROCESS_OF Homo sapiens
Subject
Social Interaction
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Homo sapiens
2. COVID-19 CAUSES multiple pathologies
Subject
COVID-19
Predicate
CAUSES
Object
multiple pathologies
3. Symptoms ASSOCIATED_WITH COVID-19
Subject
Symptoms
Predicate
ASSOCIATED_WITH
Object
COVID-19
4. Memory impairment PROCESS_OF Adult
Subject
Memory impairment
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Adult
5. Memory impairment PROCESS_OF Child
Subject
Memory impairment
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Child
6. Communicable Diseases AFFECTS biological adaptation to stress
Subject
Communicable Diseases
Predicate
AFFECTS
Object
biological adaptation to stress
7. Social Interaction PROCESS_OF Homo sapiens
Subject
Social Interaction
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Homo sapiens
8. COVID-19 CAUSES multiple pathologies
Subject
COVID-19
Predicate
CAUSES
Object
multiple pathologies
9. Symptoms ASSOCIATED_WITH COVID-19
Subject
Symptoms
Predicate
ASSOCIATED_WITH
Object
COVID-19
10. Memory impairment PROCESS_OF Adult
Subject
Memory impairment
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Adult
11. Memory impairment PROCESS_OF Child
Subject
Memory impairment
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Child
12. Communicable Diseases AFFECTS biological adaptation to stress
Subject
Communicable Diseases
Predicate
AFFECTS
Object
biological adaptation to stress
ABSTRACT
BACKGROUND AND

OBJECTIVES:

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a highly contagious infectious disease, responsible for a global pandemic that began in January 2020. Human/COVID-19 interactions cause different outcomes ranging from minor health consequences to death. Since social interaction is the default mode by which individuals communicate with their surroundings, different modes of contagion can play a role in determining the long-term consequences for mental health and emotional well-being. We examined some basic aspects of human social interaction, emphasizing some particular features of the emotional contagion. Moreover, we analyzed the main report that described brain damage related to the COVID-19 infection. Indeed, the goal of this review is to suggest a possible explanation for the relationships among emotionally impaired people, brain damage, and COVID-19 infection.

RESULTS:

COVID-19 can cause several significant neurological disorders and the pandemic has been linked to a rise in people reporting mental health problems, such as depression and anxiety. Neurocognitive symptoms associated with COVID-19 include delirium, both acute and chronic attention and memory impairment related to hippocampal and cortical damage, as well as learning deficits in both adults and children.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although our knowledge on the biology and long-term clinical outcomes of the COVID-19 infection is largely limited, approaching the pandemic based on lessons learnt from previous outbreaks of infectious diseases and the biology of other coronaviruses will provide a suitable pathway for developing public mental health strategies, which could be positively translated into therapeutic approaches, attempting to improve stress coping responses, thus contributing to alleviate the burden driven by the pandemic.
Subject(s)
Keywords

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Brain Diseases / Mental Health / Psychological Distress / SARS-CoV-2 / COVID-19 Type of study: Experimental Studies / Observational study / Prognostic study / Qualitative research Topics: Long Covid Limits: Humans Language: English Journal subject: Medicine Year: 2020 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Medicina56120640

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Brain Diseases / Mental Health / Psychological Distress / SARS-CoV-2 / COVID-19 Type of study: Experimental Studies / Observational study / Prognostic study / Qualitative research Topics: Long Covid Limits: Humans Language: English Journal subject: Medicine Year: 2020 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Medicina56120640