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Intergenerational conflicts of interest and prosocial behavior during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Jin, Shuxian; Balliet, Daniel; Romano, Angelo; Spadaro, Giuliana; van Lissa, Caspar J; Agostini, Maximilian; Bélanger, Jocelyn J; Gützkow, Ben; Kreienkamp, Jannis; Leander, N Pontus.
  • Jin S; Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1105, 1081 HV Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
  • Balliet D; Institute of Brain and Behavior Amsterdam, Van der Boechorststraat 7, 1081 BT Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
  • Romano A; Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1105, 1081 HV Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
  • Spadaro G; Institute of Brain and Behavior Amsterdam, Van der Boechorststraat 7, 1081 BT Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
  • van Lissa CJ; Leiden University, PO Box 9500, 2300 RA Leiden, the Netherlands.
  • Agostini M; Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1105, 1081 HV Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
  • Bélanger JJ; Institute of Brain and Behavior Amsterdam, Van der Boechorststraat 7, 1081 BT Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
  • Gützkow B; Utrecht University, PO Box 80125, 3508 TC Utrecht, the Netherlands.
  • Kreienkamp J; University of Groningen, PO Box 72, 9700 AB Groningen, the Netherlands.
  • Leander NP; University of Groningen, PO Box 72, 9700 AB Groningen, the Netherlands.
Pers Individ Dif ; 171: 110535, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1047768
ABSTRACT
The COVID-19 pandemic presents threats, such as severe disease and economic hardship, to people of different ages. These threats can also be experienced asymmetrically across age groups, which could lead to generational differences in behavioral responses to reduce the spread of the disease. We report a survey conducted across 56 societies (N = 58,641), and tested pre-registered hypotheses about how age relates to (a) perceived personal costs during the pandemic, (b) prosocial COVID-19 responses (e.g., social distancing), and (c) support for behavioral regulations (e.g., mandatory quarantine, vaccination). We further tested whether the relation between age and prosocial COVID-19 responses can be explained by perceived personal costs during the pandemic. Overall, we found that older people perceived more costs of contracting the virus, but less costs in daily life due to the pandemic. However, age displayed no clear, robust associations with prosocial COVID-19 responses and support for behavioral regulations. We discuss the implications of this work for understanding the potential intergenerational conflicts of interest that could occur during the COVID-19 pandemic.
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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Type of study: Randomized controlled trials Topics: Vaccines Language: English Journal: Pers Individ Dif Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: J.paid.2020.110535

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Type of study: Randomized controlled trials Topics: Vaccines Language: English Journal: Pers Individ Dif Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: J.paid.2020.110535