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At Least Seven Distinct Rotavirus Genotype Constellations in Bats with Evidence of Reassortment and Zoonotic Transmissions.
Simsek, Ceren; Corman, Victor Max; Everling, Hermann Ulrich; Lukashev, Alexander N; Rasche, Andrea; Maganga, Gael Darren; Binger, Tabea; Jansen, Daan; Beller, Leen; Deboutte, Ward; Gloza-Rausch, Florian; Seebens-Hoyer, Antje; Yordanov, Stoian; Sylverken, Augustina; Oppong, Samuel; Sarkodie, Yaw Adu; Vallo, Peter; Leroy, Eric M; Bourgarel, Mathieu; Yinda, Kwe Claude; Van Ranst, Marc; Drosten, Christian; Drexler, Jan Felix; Matthijnssens, Jelle.
  • Simsek C; KU Leuven-University of Leuven, Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Transplantation, Rega Institute for Medical Research, Leuven, Belgium.
  • Corman VM; Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, corporate member of Freie Universität Berlin, Humbolt-Universität zu Berlin and Berlin Institute of Health, Institute of Virology, Berlin, Germany.
  • Everling HU; German Centre for Infection Research (DZIF), associated partner Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
  • Lukashev AN; Institute of Virology, University of Bonn Medical Centre, Bonn, Germany.
  • Rasche A; Sechenov University, Moscow, Russia.
  • Maganga GD; Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, corporate member of Freie Universität Berlin, Humbolt-Universität zu Berlin and Berlin Institute of Health, Institute of Virology, Berlin, Germany.
  • Binger T; German Centre for Infection Research (DZIF), associated partner Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
  • Jansen D; Centre International de Recherches Médicales de Franceville, Franceville, Gabon.
  • Beller L; Université des Sciences et Technique de Masuku, Institut National d'Agronomie et de Biotechnologies, Franceville, Gabon.
  • Deboutte W; Kumasi Centre for Collaborative Research in Tropical Medicine (KCCR), Kumasi, Ghana.
  • Gloza-Rausch F; KU Leuven-University of Leuven, Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Transplantation, Rega Institute for Medical Research, Leuven, Belgium.
  • Seebens-Hoyer A; KU Leuven-University of Leuven, Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Transplantation, Rega Institute for Medical Research, Leuven, Belgium.
  • Yordanov S; KU Leuven-University of Leuven, Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Transplantation, Rega Institute for Medical Research, Leuven, Belgium.
  • Sylverken A; Noctalis, Centre for Bat Protection and Information, Bad Segeberg, Germany.
  • Oppong S; Noctalis, Centre for Bat Protection and Information, Bad Segeberg, Germany.
  • Sarkodie YA; Forestry Board Directorate of Strandja Natural Park, Malko Tarnovo, Bulgaria.
  • Vallo P; Kumasi Centre for Collaborative Research in Tropical Medicine (KCCR), Kumasi, Ghana.
  • Leroy EM; Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.
  • Bourgarel M; Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.
  • Yinda KC; Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.
  • Van Ranst M; Institute of Vertebrate Biology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Brno, Czech Republic.
  • Drosten C; Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, UMR 224 (MIVEGEC), IRD/CNRS/Montpellier University, Montpellier, France.
  • Drexler JF; CIRAD, UMR ASTRE, Harare, Zimbabwe.
  • Matthijnssens J; ASTRE, Montpellier University, CIRAD, INRA, Montpellier, France.
mBio ; 12(1)2021 01 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066819
Semantic information from SemMedBD (by NLM)
1. Rotavirus PROCESS_OF Chiroptera
Subject
Rotavirus
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Chiroptera
2. Rotavirus CAUSES Diarrheal disorder
Subject
Rotavirus
Predicate
CAUSES
Object
Diarrheal disorder
3. Diarrheal disorder PROCESS_OF Aves
Subject
Diarrheal disorder
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Aves
4. Diarrheal disorder PROCESS_OF Mammals
Subject
Diarrheal disorder
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Mammals
5. Rotavirus PROCESS_OF Homo sapiens
Subject
Rotavirus
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Homo sapiens
6. Rotavirus PROCESS_OF Chiroptera
Subject
Rotavirus
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Chiroptera
7. Rotavirus CAUSES Diarrheal disorder
Subject
Rotavirus
Predicate
CAUSES
Object
Diarrheal disorder
8. Diarrheal disorder PROCESS_OF Aves
Subject
Diarrheal disorder
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Aves
9. Diarrheal disorder PROCESS_OF Mammals
Subject
Diarrheal disorder
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Mammals
10. Rotavirus PROCESS_OF Homo sapiens
Subject
Rotavirus
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Homo sapiens
ABSTRACT
Bats host many viruses pathogenic to humans, and increasing evidence suggests that rotavirus A (RVA) also belongs to this list. Rotaviruses cause diarrheal disease in many mammals and birds, and their segmented genomes allow them to reassort and increase their genetic diversity. Eighteen out of 2,142 bat fecal samples (0.8%) collected from Europe, Central America, and Africa were PCR-positive for RVA, and 11 of those were fully characterized using viral metagenomics. Upon contrasting their genomes with publicly available data, at least 7 distinct bat RVA genotype constellations (GCs) were identified, which included evidence of reassortments and 6 novel genotypes. Some of these constellations are spread across the world, whereas others appear to be geographically restricted. Our analyses also suggest that several unusual human and equine RVA strains might be of bat RVA origin, based on their phylogenetic clustering, despite various levels of nucleotide sequence identities between them. Although SA11 is one of the most widely used reference strains for RVA research and forms the backbone of a reverse genetics system, its origin remained enigmatic. Remarkably, the majority of the genotypes of SA11-like strains were shared with Gabonese bat RVAs, suggesting a potential common origin. Overall, our findings suggest an underexplored genetic diversity of RVAs in bats, which is likely only the tip of the iceberg. Increasing contact between humans and bat wildlife will further increase the zoonosis risk, which warrants closer attention to these viruses.IMPORTANCE The increased research on bat coronaviruses after severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) allowed the very rapid identification of SARS-CoV-2. This is an excellent example of the importance of knowing viruses harbored by wildlife in general, and bats in particular, for global preparedness against emerging viral pathogens. The current effort to characterize bat rotavirus strains from 3 continents sheds light on the vast genetic diversity of rotaviruses and also hints at a bat origin for several atypical rotaviruses in humans and animals, implying that zoonoses of bat rotaviruses might occur more frequently than currently realized.
Subject(s)
Keywords

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Rotavirus Infections / Zoonoses / Chiroptera / Rotavirus Type of study: Prognostic study / Randomized controlled trials Limits: Animals / Humans Language: English Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: MBio.02755-20

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Rotavirus Infections / Zoonoses / Chiroptera / Rotavirus Type of study: Prognostic study / Randomized controlled trials Limits: Animals / Humans Language: English Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: MBio.02755-20