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Examining Australian's beliefs, misconceptions and sources of information for COVID-19: a national online survey.
Thomas, Rae; Greenwood, Hannah; Michaleff, Zoe A; Abukmail, Eman; Hoffmann, Tammy C; McCaffery, Kirsten; Hardiman, Leah; Glasziou, Paul.
  • Thomas R; Institute for Evidence-Based Healthcare, Faculty of Health Sciences and Medicine, Bond University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia rthomas@bond.edu.au.
  • Greenwood H; Institute for Evidence-Based Healthcare, Faculty of Health Sciences and Medicine, Bond University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.
  • Michaleff ZA; Institute for Evidence-Based Healthcare, Faculty of Health Sciences and Medicine, Bond University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.
  • Abukmail E; Institute for Evidence-Based Healthcare, Faculty of Health Sciences and Medicine, Bond University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.
  • Hoffmann TC; Institute for Evidence-Based Healthcare, Faculty of Health Sciences and Medicine, Bond University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.
  • McCaffery K; Sydney Health Literacy Lab, Sydney School of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
  • Hardiman L; Consumer Representative, Maternity Choices Australia, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
  • Glasziou P; Institute for Evidence-Based Healthcare, Faculty of Health Sciences and Medicine, Bond University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.
BMJ Open ; 11(2): e043421, 2021 02 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1099770
Preprint
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Semantic information from SemMedBD (by NLM)
1. other medicated shampoos in ATC PREVENTS COVID-19
Subject
other medicated shampoos in ATC
Predicate
PREVENTS
Object
COVID-19
2. Antibiotics NEG_PREVENTS COVID-19
Subject
Antibiotics
Predicate
NEG_PREVENTS
Object
COVID-19
3. Virus PROCESS_OF Participant
Subject
Virus
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Participant
4. BARRIER TREATS Persons
Subject
BARRIER
Predicate
TREATS
Object
Persons
5. other medicated shampoos in ATC PREVENTS COVID-19
Subject
other medicated shampoos in ATC
Predicate
PREVENTS
Object
COVID-19
6. Antibiotics NEG_PREVENTS COVID-19
Subject
Antibiotics
Predicate
NEG_PREVENTS
Object
COVID-19
7. Virus PROCESS_OF Participant
Subject
Virus
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Participant
8. BARRIER TREATS Persons
Subject
BARRIER
Predicate
TREATS
Object
Persons
ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE:

Public cooperation to practise preventive health behaviours is essential to manage the transmission of infectious diseases such as COVID-19. We aimed to investigate beliefs about COVID-19 diagnosis, transmission and prevention that have the potential to impact the uptake of recommended public health strategies.

DESIGN:

An online cross-sectional survey.

PARTICIPANTS:

A national sample of 1500 Australian adults with representative quotas for age and gender provided by an online panel provider. MAIN OUTCOME

MEASURE:

Proportion of participants with correct/incorrect knowledge of COVID-19 preventive behaviours and reasons for misconceptions.

RESULTS:

Of the 1802 potential participants contacted, 289 did not qualify, 13 declined and 1500 participated in the survey (response rate 83%). Most participants correctly identified 'washing your hands regularly with soap and water' (92%) and 'staying at least 1.5 m away from others' (90%) could help prevent COVID-19. Over 40% (incorrectly) considered wearing gloves outside of the home would prevent them from contracting COVID-19. Views about face masks were divided. Only 66% of participants correctly identified that 'regular use of antibiotics' would not prevent COVID-19.Most participants (90%) identified 'fever, fatigue and cough' as indicators of COVID-19. However, 42% of participants thought that being unable to 'hold your breath for 10 s without coughing' was an indicator of having the virus. The most frequently reported sources of COVID-19 information were commercial television channels (56%), the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (43%) and the Australian Government COVID-19 information app (31%).

CONCLUSIONS:

Public messaging about hand hygiene and physical distancing to prevent transmission appears to have been effective. However, there are clear, identified barriers for many individuals that have the potential to impede uptake or maintenance of these behaviours in the long term. We need to develop public health messages that harness these barriers to improve future cooperation. Ensuring adherence to these interventions is critical.
Subject(s)
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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: COVID-19 Type of study: Diagnostic study / Observational study / Prognostic study / Randomized controlled trials Limits: Adolescent / Adult / Aged / Female / Humans / Male / Middle aged / Young adult Country/Region as subject: Oceania Language: English Journal: BMJ Open Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Bmjopen-2020-043421

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: COVID-19 Type of study: Diagnostic study / Observational study / Prognostic study / Randomized controlled trials Limits: Adolescent / Adult / Aged / Female / Humans / Male / Middle aged / Young adult Country/Region as subject: Oceania Language: English Journal: BMJ Open Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Bmjopen-2020-043421