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The effect of spike mutations on SARS-CoV-2 neutralization.
Rees-Spear, Chloe; Muir, Luke; Griffith, Sarah A; Heaney, Judith; Aldon, Yoann; Snitselaar, Jonne L; Thomas, Peter; Graham, Carl; Seow, Jeffrey; Lee, Nayung; Rosa, Annachiara; Roustan, Chloe; Houlihan, Catherine F; Sanders, Rogier W; Gupta, Ravindra K; Cherepanov, Peter; Stauss, Hans J; Nastouli, Eleni; Doores, Katie J; van Gils, Marit J; McCoy, Laura E.
  • Rees-Spear C; Institute of Immunity and Transplantation, Division of Infection and Immunity, University College London, London NW3 2PF, UK.
  • Muir L; Institute of Immunity and Transplantation, Division of Infection and Immunity, University College London, London NW3 2PF, UK.
  • Griffith SA; Institute of Immunity and Transplantation, Division of Infection and Immunity, University College London, London NW3 2PF, UK.
  • Heaney J; Advanced Pathogens Diagnostic Unit, Department of Clinical Virology, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London W1T 4EU, UK.
  • Aldon Y; Amsterdam University Medical Centers, Amsterdam Institute for Infection and Immunity, University of Amsterdam, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
  • Snitselaar JL; Amsterdam University Medical Centers, Amsterdam Institute for Infection and Immunity, University of Amsterdam, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
  • Thomas P; Institute of Immunity and Transplantation, Division of Infection and Immunity, University College London, London NW3 2PF, UK.
  • Graham C; School of Immunology and Microbial Sciences, King's College London, London SE1 9RT, UK.
  • Seow J; School of Immunology and Microbial Sciences, King's College London, London SE1 9RT, UK.
  • Lee N; Institute of Immunity and Transplantation, Division of Infection and Immunity, University College London, London NW3 2PF, UK.
  • Rosa A; The Francis Crick Institute, London NW1 1AT, UK.
  • Roustan C; The Francis Crick Institute, London NW1 1AT, UK.
  • Houlihan CF; Advanced Pathogens Diagnostic Unit, Department of Clinical Virology, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London W1T 4EU, UK; Research Department of Infection, Division of Infection and Immunity, University College London, London WC1 6BT, UK.
  • Sanders RW; Amsterdam University Medical Centers, Amsterdam Institute for Infection and Immunity, University of Amsterdam, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
  • Gupta RK; Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0AW, UK.
  • Cherepanov P; The Francis Crick Institute, London NW1 1AT, UK.
  • Stauss HJ; Institute of Immunity and Transplantation, Division of Infection and Immunity, University College London, London NW3 2PF, UK.
  • Nastouli E; Advanced Pathogens Diagnostic Unit, Department of Clinical Virology, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London W1T 4EU, UK; The Francis Crick Institute, London NW1 1AT, UK; Great Ormond Street Institute for Child Health, Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University College
  • Doores KJ; School of Immunology and Microbial Sciences, King's College London, London SE1 9RT, UK.
  • van Gils MJ; Amsterdam University Medical Centers, Amsterdam Institute for Infection and Immunity, University of Amsterdam, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
  • McCoy LE; Institute of Immunity and Transplantation, Division of Infection and Immunity, University College London, London NW3 2PF, UK. Electronic address: l.mccoy@ucl.ac.uk.
Cell Rep ; 34(12): 108890, 2021 03 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1131156
Semantic information from SemMedBD (by NLM)
1. Antibodie INTERACTS_WITH C0042210
Subject
Antibodie
Predicate
INTERACTS_WITH
Object
C0042210
2. Persons LOCATION_OF Polyclonal antibody
Subject
Persons
Predicate
LOCATION_OF
Object
Polyclonal antibody
3. Antibodies, Neutralizing INTERACTS_WITH Vaccines
Subject
Antibodies, Neutralizing
Predicate
INTERACTS_WITH
Object
Vaccines
4. Persons LOCATION_OF Polyclonal antibody
Subject
Persons
Predicate
LOCATION_OF
Object
Polyclonal antibody
ABSTRACT
Multiple severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vaccines show protective efficacy, which is most likely mediated by neutralizing antibodies recognizing the viral entry protein, spike. Because new SARS-CoV-2 variants are emerging rapidly, as exemplified by the B.1.1.7, B.1.351, and P.1 lineages, it is critical to understand whether antibody responses induced by infection with the original SARS-CoV-2 virus or current vaccines remain effective. In this study, we evaluate neutralization of a series of mutated spike pseudotypes based on divergence from SARS-CoV and then compare neutralization of the B.1.1.7 spike pseudotype and individual mutations. Spike-specific monoclonal antibody neutralization is reduced dramatically; in contrast, polyclonal antibodies from individuals infected in early 2020 remain active against most mutated spike pseudotypes, but potency is reduced in a minority of samples. This work highlights that changes in SARS-CoV-2 spike can alter neutralization sensitivity and underlines the need for effective real-time monitoring of emerging mutations and their effect on vaccine efficacy.
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Keywords

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Antibodies, Neutralizing / Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus / SARS-CoV-2 / COVID-19 Topics: Vaccines / Variants Limits: Humans Language: English Journal: Cell Rep Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: J.celrep.2021.108890

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Antibodies, Neutralizing / Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus / SARS-CoV-2 / COVID-19 Topics: Vaccines / Variants Limits: Humans Language: English Journal: Cell Rep Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: J.celrep.2021.108890