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Association between living with children and outcomes from covid-19: OpenSAFELY cohort study of 12 million adults in England.
Forbes, Harriet; Morton, Caroline E; Bacon, Seb; McDonald, Helen I; Minassian, Caroline; Brown, Jeremy P; Rentsch, Christopher T; Mathur, Rohini; Schultze, Anna; DeVito, Nicholas J; MacKenna, Brian; Hulme, William J; Croker, Richard; Walker, Alex J; Williamson, Elizabeth J; Bates, Chris; Mehrkar, Amir; Curtis, Helen J; Evans, David; Wing, Kevin; Inglesby, Peter; Drysdale, Henry; Wong, Angel Y S; Cockburn, Jonathan; McManus, Robert; Parry, John; Hester, Frank; Harper, Sam; Douglas, Ian J; Smeeth, Liam; Evans, Stephen J W; Bhaskaran, Krishnan; Eggo, Rosalind M; Goldacre, Ben; Tomlinson, Laurie A.
  • Forbes H; Electronic Health Records Research Group, Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
  • Morton CE; The DataLab, Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford OX2 6GG, UK.
  • Bacon S; The DataLab, Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford OX2 6GG, UK.
  • McDonald HI; Electronic Health Records Research Group, Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
  • Minassian C; Electronic Health Records Research Group, Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
  • Brown JP; Electronic Health Records Research Group, Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
  • Rentsch CT; Electronic Health Records Research Group, Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
  • Mathur R; Electronic Health Records Research Group, Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
  • Schultze A; Electronic Health Records Research Group, Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
  • DeVito NJ; The DataLab, Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford OX2 6GG, UK.
  • MacKenna B; The DataLab, Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford OX2 6GG, UK.
  • Hulme WJ; The DataLab, Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford OX2 6GG, UK.
  • Croker R; The DataLab, Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford OX2 6GG, UK.
  • Walker AJ; The DataLab, Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford OX2 6GG, UK.
  • Williamson EJ; Electronic Health Records Research Group, Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
  • Bates C; The Phoenix Partnership, 129 Low Lane, Horsforth, Leeds, UK.
  • Mehrkar A; The DataLab, Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford OX2 6GG, UK.
  • Curtis HJ; The DataLab, Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford OX2 6GG, UK.
  • Evans D; The DataLab, Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford OX2 6GG, UK.
  • Wing K; Electronic Health Records Research Group, Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
  • Inglesby P; The DataLab, Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford OX2 6GG, UK.
  • Drysdale H; The DataLab, Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford OX2 6GG, UK.
  • Wong AYS; Electronic Health Records Research Group, Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
  • Cockburn J; The Phoenix Partnership, 129 Low Lane, Horsforth, Leeds, UK.
  • McManus R; The Phoenix Partnership, 129 Low Lane, Horsforth, Leeds, UK.
  • Parry J; The Phoenix Partnership, 129 Low Lane, Horsforth, Leeds, UK.
  • Hester F; The Phoenix Partnership, 129 Low Lane, Horsforth, Leeds, UK.
  • Harper S; The Phoenix Partnership, 129 Low Lane, Horsforth, Leeds, UK.
  • Douglas IJ; Electronic Health Records Research Group, Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
  • Smeeth L; Electronic Health Records Research Group, Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
  • Evans SJW; Electronic Health Records Research Group, Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
  • Bhaskaran K; Electronic Health Records Research Group, Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
  • Eggo RM; Electronic Health Records Research Group, Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
  • Goldacre B; Centre for Mathematical Modelling of Infectious Diseases, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
  • Tomlinson LA; The DataLab, Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford OX2 6GG, UK.
BMJ ; 372: n628, 2021 03 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1143026
Semantic information from SemMedBD (by NLM)
1. Present PROCESS_OF Households
Subject
Present
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Households
2. 65 years PROCESS_OF Adult
Subject
65 years
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Adult
3. COVID-19 PROCESS_OF Child
Subject
COVID-19
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Child
4. COVID-19 PROCESS_OF Adult
Subject
COVID-19
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Adult
5. Present PROCESS_OF Households
Subject
Present
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Households
6. 65 years PROCESS_OF Adult
Subject
65 years
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Adult
7. COVID-19 PROCESS_OF Child
Subject
COVID-19
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Child
8. COVID-19 PROCESS_OF Adult
Subject
COVID-19
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Adult
ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate whether risk of infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and outcomes of coronavirus disease 2019 (covid-19) differed between adults living with and without children during the first two waves of the UK pandemic.

DESIGN:

Population based cohort study, on behalf of NHS England.

SETTING:

Primary care data and pseudonymously linked hospital and intensive care admissions and death records from England, during wave 1 (1 February to 31 August 2020) and wave 2 (1 September to 18 December 2020).

PARTICIPANTS:

Two cohorts of adults (18 years and over) registered at a general practice on 1 February 2020 and 1 September 2020. MAIN OUTCOME

MEASURES:

Adjusted hazard ratios for SARS-CoV-2 infection, covid-19 related admission to hospital or intensive care, or death from covid-19, by presence of children in the household.

RESULTS:

Among 9 334 392adults aged 65 years and under, during wave 1, living with children was not associated with materially increased risks of recorded SARS-CoV-2 infection, covid-19 related hospital or intensive care admission, or death from covid-19. In wave 2, among adults aged 65 years and under, living with children of any age was associated with an increased risk of recorded SARS-CoV-2 infection (hazard ratio 1.06 (95% confidence interval 1.05 to 1.08) for living with children aged 0-11 years; 1.22 (1.20 to 1.24) for living with children aged 12-18 years) and covid-19 related hospital admission (1.18 (1.06 to 1.31) for living with children aged 0-11; 1.26 (1.12 to 1.40) for living with children aged 12-18). Living with children aged 0-11 was associated with reduced risk of death from both covid-19 and non-covid-19 causes in both waves; living with children of any age was also associated with lower risk of dying from non-covid-19 causes. For adults 65 years and under during wave 2, living with children aged 0-11 years was associated with an increased absolute risk of having SARS-CoV-2 infection recorded of 40-60 per 10 000 people, from 810 to between 850 and 870, and an increase in the number of hospital admissions of 1-5 per 10 000 people, from 160 to between 161 and 165. Living with children aged 12-18 years was associated with an increase of 160-190 per 10 000 in the number of SARS-CoV-2 infections and an increase of 2-6 per 10 000 in the number of hospital admissions.

CONCLUSIONS:

In contrast to wave 1, evidence existed of increased risk of reported SARS-CoV-2 infection and covid-19 outcomes among adults living with children during wave 2. However, this did not translate into a materially increased risk of covid-19 mortality, and absolute increases in risk were small.
Subject(s)

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Family Characteristics / COVID-19 / Hospitalization / Intensive Care Units Type of study: Etiology study / Incidence study / Observational study / Prognostic study / Risk factors Limits: Adolescent / Adult / Aged / Child / Child, preschool / Female / Humans / Infant / Male / Middle aged Country/Region as subject: Europa Language: English Journal: BMJ Journal subject: Medicine Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Bmj.n628

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Family Characteristics / COVID-19 / Hospitalization / Intensive Care Units Type of study: Etiology study / Incidence study / Observational study / Prognostic study / Risk factors Limits: Adolescent / Adult / Aged / Child / Child, preschool / Female / Humans / Infant / Male / Middle aged Country/Region as subject: Europa Language: English Journal: BMJ Journal subject: Medicine Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Bmj.n628