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Changes in social relationships during an initial "stay-at-home" phase of the COVID-19 pandemic: A longitudinal survey study in the U.S.
Philpot, Lindsey M; Ramar, Priya; Roellinger, Daniel L; Barry, Barbara A; Sharma, Pravesh; Ebbert, Jon O.
  • Philpot LM; Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Healthcare Delivery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. Electronic address: Philpot.Lindsey@mayo.edu.
  • Ramar P; Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Healthcare Delivery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.
  • Roellinger DL; Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Services Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.
  • Barry BA; Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Healthcare Delivery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.
  • Sharma P; Department of Psychiatry, Mayo Clinic Health System, Eau Claire, WI, USA.
  • Ebbert JO; Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.
Soc Sci Med ; 274: 113779, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1176937
Semantic information from SemMedBD (by NLM)
1. Virus CAUSES COVID-19
Subject
Virus
Predicate
CAUSES
Object
COVID-19
2. Esthesia PROCESS_OF Persons
Subject
Esthesia
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Persons
3. Feelings PROCESS_OF Persons
Subject
Feelings
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Persons
4. Virus CAUSES COVID-19
Subject
Virus
Predicate
CAUSES
Object
COVID-19
5. Esthesia PROCESS_OF Persons
Subject
Esthesia
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Persons
6. Feelings PROCESS_OF Persons
Subject
Feelings
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Persons
ABSTRACT
RATIONALE Severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS CoV-2), the virus that causes COVID-19, and consequent social distancing directives have been observed to negatively impact social relationships but the impact of these changes on the quality of social relationships at a population level has not been explored.

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate changes in social relationships in a U.S. population sample during a time of social distancing.

METHODS:

We deployed a matched, longitudinal survey design of the National Institutes of Health Adult Social Relationship Scales to assess the social aspects of emotional support, instrumental support, friendship, loneliness, perceived hostility, and perceived rejection from a time without social distancing (February 2018) to a time where social distancing directives were active (May 2020). Changes in social relationships were compared using paired t-tests, and generalized linear regression models were constructed to identify subpopulations experiencing differential changes in each subdomain of social relationships during social distancing.

RESULTS:

Within our sample population, individuals experienced an increased sense of emotional support, instrumental support, and loneliness, and decreased feelings of friendship and perceived hostility during a period of social distancing. Individuals with low self-rated health experienced a decreased sense of emotional support, and females experienced increased feelings of loneliness compared with males.

CONCLUSIONS:

Social distancing measurably impacts social relationships and may have a disproportionate impact on females and individuals with lower self-rated health. If novel emergent infectious diseases become more commonplace, social interventions may be needed to mitigate the potential adverse impact of social distancing on social relationships.
Subject(s)
Keywords

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Quarantine / Pandemics / COVID-19 / Interpersonal Relations Type of study: Observational study / Randomized controlled trials Limits: Adult / Female / Humans / Male Country/Region as subject: North America Language: English Journal: Soc Sci Med Year: 2021 Document Type: Article

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Quarantine / Pandemics / COVID-19 / Interpersonal Relations Type of study: Observational study / Randomized controlled trials Limits: Adult / Female / Humans / Male Country/Region as subject: North America Language: English Journal: Soc Sci Med Year: 2021 Document Type: Article