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Safety and Reactogenicity of 2 Doses of SARS-CoV-2 Vaccination in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients.
Ou, Michael T; Boyarsky, Brian J; Motter, Jennifer D; Greenberg, Ross S; Teles, Aura T; Ruddy, Jake A; Krach, Michelle R; Jain, Vedant S; Werbel, William A; Avery, Robin K; Massie, Allan B; Segev, Dorry L; Garonzik-Wang, Jacqueline M.
  • Ou MT; Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
  • Boyarsky BJ; Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
  • Motter JD; Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
  • Greenberg RS; Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
  • Teles AT; Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
  • Ruddy JA; Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
  • Krach MR; Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
  • Jain VS; Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
  • Werbel WA; Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
  • Avery RK; Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
  • Massie AB; Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
  • Segev DL; Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
  • Garonzik-Wang JM; Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD.
Transplantation ; 105(10): 2170-2174, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1189537
Semantic information from SemMedBD (by NLM)
1. SARS-CoV-2 vaccination TREATS Solid Organ Transplant Recipient
Subject
SARS-CoV-2 vaccination
Predicate
TREATS
Object
Solid Organ Transplant Recipient
2. Symptoms PROCESS_OF Participant
Subject
Symptoms
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Participant
3. Antibody Formation PROCESS_OF Participant
Subject
Antibody Formation
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Participant
4. Pain PROCESS_OF Participant
Subject
Pain
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Participant
5. nervous system disorder diagnosis DIAGNOSES 2019 novel coronavirus
Subject
nervous system disorder diagnosis
Predicate
DIAGNOSES
Object
2019 novel coronavirus
6. Urinary hesitation PROCESS_OF Transplant Recipients
Subject
Urinary hesitation
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Transplant Recipients
7. SARS-CoV-2 vaccination TREATS Solid Organ Transplant Recipient
Subject
SARS-CoV-2 vaccination
Predicate
TREATS
Object
Solid Organ Transplant Recipient
8. Symptoms PROCESS_OF Participant
Subject
Symptoms
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Participant
9. Antibody Formation PROCESS_OF Participant
Subject
Antibody Formation
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Participant
10. Pain PROCESS_OF Participant
Subject
Pain
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Participant
11. nervous system disorder diagnosis DIAGNOSES 2019 novel coronavirus
Subject
nervous system disorder diagnosis
Predicate
DIAGNOSES
Object
2019 novel coronavirus
12. Urinary hesitation PROCESS_OF Transplant Recipients
Subject
Urinary hesitation
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Transplant Recipients
ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND:

We studied the safety and reactogenicity SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccines in transplant recipients because immunosuppressed patients were excluded from vaccine trials.

METHODS:

US transplant recipients were recruited into this prospective cohort study through social media; those who completed the full vaccine series between December 9, 2020 and March 1, 2021 were included. We collected demographics, medical history, and safety information within 7 d after doses 1 and 2 (D1, D2). Associations between characteristics and reactions were evaluated using modified Poisson regression.

RESULTS:

We studied 741 transplant recipients who underwent BNT162b2 (54%) or mRNA-1273 (46%) vaccination. Median (interquartile range) age was 60 (44-69) y, 57% were female, and 10% were non-White. Although local site reactions decreased after D2 (85% D1 versus 78% D2, P < 0.001), systemic reactions increased (49% D1 versus 69% D2, P < 0.001). Younger participants were more likely to develop systemic symptoms after D1 (adjusted incidence rate ratio [aIRR] per 10 y = 0.850.900.94, P < 0.001) and D2 (aIRR per 10 y = 0.910.930.96, P < 0.001). Participants who experienced pain (aIRR = 1.111.662.47, P = 0.01) or redness (aIRR = 1.833.928.41, P < 0.01) were more likely to develop an antibody response to D1 of mRNA vaccines. No anaphylaxis, neurologic diagnoses, or SARS-CoV-2 diagnoses were reported. Infections were minimal (3% after D1, <0.01% after D2). One patient reported incident acute rejection post-D2.

CONCLUSIONS:

In solid organ transplant recipients undergoing mRNA vaccination, reactogenicity was similar to that reported in the original trials. Severe reactions were rare. These early safety data may help address vaccine hesitancy in transplant recipients.
Subject(s)

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Organ Transplantation / Vaccination / COVID-19 Vaccines / SARS-CoV-2 / COVID-19 Type of study: Cohort study / Experimental Studies / Observational study / Prognostic study Topics: Long Covid / Vaccines Limits: Adult / Aged / Female / Humans / Male / Middle aged Language: English Journal: Transplantation Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: TP.0000000000003780

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Organ Transplantation / Vaccination / COVID-19 Vaccines / SARS-CoV-2 / COVID-19 Type of study: Cohort study / Experimental Studies / Observational study / Prognostic study Topics: Long Covid / Vaccines Limits: Adult / Aged / Female / Humans / Male / Middle aged Language: English Journal: Transplantation Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: TP.0000000000003780