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Intimate Partner Violence Experiences During COVID-19 Among Male Couples.
Walsh, Alison R; Sullivan, Stephen; Stephenson, Rob.
  • Walsh AR; University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
  • Sullivan S; University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
  • Stephenson R; University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
J Interpers Violence ; 37(15-16): NP14166-NP14188, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1192167
Semantic information from SemMedBD (by NLM)
1. Coitus PROCESS_OF Male population group
Subject
Coitus
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Male population group
2. Coitus PROCESS_OF Male population group
Subject
Coitus
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Male population group
ABSTRACT
In addition to the growing morbidity and mortality related to the 2019 novel coronavirus (SAR-CoV-2) pandemic, social distancing measures during the pandemic may result in increased intimate partner violence (IPV). However, it is yet unknown if gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (GBMSM)'s IPV risk has increased during this time. This article describes and analyzes IPV experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic in a sample of coupled-GBMSM in the United States. We hypothesized that pandemic-driven stressors would be associated with increased IPV prevalence and severity. A sample of 214 coupled men living in the US who had previously participated in HIV-related couple studies was surveyed in July-September 2020. Respondents reported demographic, sexual and substance use behaviors, and relationship characteristics. Surveys also collected data on pandemic-related life-changes (employment, substance use, COVID-19 illness). IPV victimization and perpetration were measured with the Gay and Bisexual Men Intimate Partner Violence scale and measured individually experienced or perpetrated violence, sexual, emotional, monitoring, or controlling behaviors, and if a given behavior was new and/or had changed in frequency during the pandemic. Reported prevalence and pandemic-related changes in victimization and perpetration were described. New or more frequent IPV victimization was modeled against employment, substance use changes, COVID-19 illness, and outside sexual partners (modified by a couple's sexual agreement). IPV perpetration prevalence was 15.17%, 34.44% of which was new or more frequent. Victimization prevalence was 14.95%, of which 46.88% was new or more frequent. After adjustment, outside sexual partners were associated with IPV among those with nonmonogamous sexual agreements; each outside sexual partner increased the odds of new or more frequent victimization by 70% (OR = 1.70; 95% CI [1.16, 2.51]). Given this study's documented rise in IPV among a sample of coupled men, additional research into IPV predictors, interventions, and support strategies in GBMSM populations are warranted.
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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Substance-Related Disorders / Intimate Partner Violence / Sexual and Gender Minorities / COVID-19 Type of study: Observational study / Prognostic study / Qualitative research Limits: Humans / Male Country/Region as subject: North America Language: English Journal: J Interpers Violence Journal subject: Social Sciences Year: 2022 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: 08862605211005135

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Substance-Related Disorders / Intimate Partner Violence / Sexual and Gender Minorities / COVID-19 Type of study: Observational study / Prognostic study / Qualitative research Limits: Humans / Male Country/Region as subject: North America Language: English Journal: J Interpers Violence Journal subject: Social Sciences Year: 2022 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: 08862605211005135