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Detection of SARS-CoV-2 in respiratory samples from cats in the UK associated with human-to-cat transmission.
Hosie, Margaret J; Epifano, Ilaria; Herder, Vanessa; Orton, Richard J; Stevenson, Andrew; Johnson, Natasha; MacDonald, Emma; Dunbar, Dawn; McDonald, Michael; Howie, Fiona; Tennant, Bryn; Herrity, Darcy; Da Silva Filipe, Ana; Streicker, Daniel G; Willett, Brian J; Murcia, Pablo R; Jarrett, Ruth F; Robertson, David L; Weir, William.
  • Hosie MJ; MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Glasgow, UK.
  • Epifano I; MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Glasgow, UK.
  • Herder V; MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Glasgow, UK.
  • Orton RJ; MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Glasgow, UK.
  • Stevenson A; MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Glasgow, UK.
  • Johnson N; MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Glasgow, UK.
  • MacDonald E; Veterinary Diagnostics Service, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.
  • Dunbar D; Veterinary Diagnostics Service, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.
  • McDonald M; Veterinary Diagnostics Service, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.
  • Howie F; SRUC Veterinary Services, Pentlands Science Park, Penicuik, Midlothian, UK.
  • Tennant B; SRUC Veterinary Services, Pentlands Science Park, Penicuik, Midlothian, UK.
  • Herrity D; Fareham Creek Veterinary Surgery, Fareham, Hampshire, UK.
  • Da Silva Filipe A; MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Glasgow, UK.
  • Streicker DG; MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Glasgow, UK.
  • Murcia PR; MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Glasgow, UK.
  • Jarrett RF; MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Glasgow, UK.
  • Robertson DL; MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Glasgow, UK.
  • Weir W; MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Glasgow, UK.
Vet Rec ; 188(8): e247, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1198417
Semantic information from SemMedBD (by NLM)
1. COVID-19 PROCESS_OF Felis catus
Subject
COVID-19
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Felis catus
2. Antigens PART_OF 2019 novel coronavirus
Subject
Antigens
Predicate
PART_OF
Object
2019 novel coronavirus
3. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism PART_OF Human virus
Subject
Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
Predicate
PART_OF
Object
Human virus
4. 2019 novel coronavirus COEXISTS_WITH COVID-19
Subject
2019 novel coronavirus
Predicate
COEXISTS_WITH
Object
COVID-19
5. COVID-19 PROCESS_OF Felis catus
Subject
COVID-19
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Felis catus
6. Antigens PART_OF 2019 novel coronavirus
Subject
Antigens
Predicate
PART_OF
Object
2019 novel coronavirus
7. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism PART_OF Human virus
Subject
Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
Predicate
PART_OF
Object
Human virus
8. 2019 novel coronavirus COEXISTS_WITH COVID-19
Subject
2019 novel coronavirus
Predicate
COEXISTS_WITH
Object
COVID-19
ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES:

The aim of the study was to find evidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection in UK cats.

DESIGN:

Tissue samples were tested for SARS-CoV-2 antigen using immunofluorescence and for viral RNA by in situ hybridisation. A set of 387 oropharyngeal swabs that had been submitted for routine respiratory pathogen testing was tested for SARS-CoV-2 RNA using reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR.

RESULTS:

Lung tissue collected post-mortem from cat 1 tested positive for both SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid antigen and RNA. SARS-CoV-2 RNA was detected in an oropharyngeal swab collected from cat 2 that presented with rhinitis and conjunctivitis. High throughput sequencing of the viral genome revealed five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) compared to the nearest UK human SARS-CoV-2 sequence, and this human virus contained eight SNPs compared to the original Wuhan-Hu-1 reference sequence. An analysis of the viral genome of cat 2 together with nine other feline-derived SARS-CoV-2 sequences from around the world revealed no shared cat-specific mutations.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings indicate that human-to-cat transmission of SARS-CoV-2 occurred during the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK, with the infected cats developing mild or severe respiratory disease. Given the ability of the new coronavirus to infect different species, it will be important to monitor for human-to-cat, cat-to-cat and cat-to-human transmission.
Subject(s)
Keywords

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Cat Diseases / Zoonoses / SARS-CoV-2 / COVID-19 / Lung Type of study: Diagnostic study / Risk factors Limits: Animals / Female / Humans Country/Region as subject: Europa Language: English Journal: Vet Rec Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Vetr.247

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Cat Diseases / Zoonoses / SARS-CoV-2 / COVID-19 / Lung Type of study: Diagnostic study / Risk factors Limits: Animals / Female / Humans Country/Region as subject: Europa Language: English Journal: Vet Rec Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Vetr.247