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SARS-CoV-2 vaccination responses in untreated, conventionally treated and anticytokine-treated patients with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases.
Simon, David; Tascilar, Koray; Fagni, Filippo; Krönke, Gerhard; Kleyer, Arnd; Meder, Christine; Atreya, Raja; Leppkes, Moritz; Kremer, Andreas E; Ramming, Andreas; Pachowsky, Milena L; Schuch, Florian; Ronneberger, Monika; Kleinert, Stefan; Hueber, Axel J; Manger, Karin; Manger, Bernhard; Berking, Carola; Sticherling, Michael; Neurath, Markus F; Schett, Georg.
  • Simon D; Department of Internal Medicine 3 - Rheumatology and Immunology, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg and Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany.
  • Tascilar K; Deutsches Zentrum fuer Immuntherapie (DZI), Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg and Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany.
  • Fagni F; Department of Internal Medicine 3 - Rheumatology and Immunology, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg and Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany.
  • Krönke G; Deutsches Zentrum fuer Immuntherapie (DZI), Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg and Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany.
  • Kleyer A; Department of Internal Medicine 3 - Rheumatology and Immunology, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg and Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany.
  • Meder C; Deutsches Zentrum fuer Immuntherapie (DZI), Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg and Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany.
  • Atreya R; Department of Internal Medicine 3 - Rheumatology and Immunology, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg and Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany.
  • Leppkes M; Deutsches Zentrum fuer Immuntherapie (DZI), Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg and Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany.
  • Kremer AE; Department of Internal Medicine 3 - Rheumatology and Immunology, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg and Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany.
  • Ramming A; Deutsches Zentrum fuer Immuntherapie (DZI), Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg and Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany.
  • Pachowsky ML; Deutsches Zentrum fuer Immuntherapie (DZI), Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg and Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany.
  • Schuch F; Department of Dermatology, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany.
  • Ronneberger M; Deutsches Zentrum fuer Immuntherapie (DZI), Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg and Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany.
  • Kleinert S; Department of Internal Medicine 1, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany.
  • Hueber AJ; Deutsches Zentrum fuer Immuntherapie (DZI), Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg and Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany.
  • Manger K; Department of Internal Medicine 1, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany.
  • Manger B; Deutsches Zentrum fuer Immuntherapie (DZI), Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg and Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany.
  • Berking C; Department of Internal Medicine 1, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany.
  • Sticherling M; Department of Internal Medicine 3 - Rheumatology and Immunology, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg and Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany.
  • Neurath MF; Deutsches Zentrum fuer Immuntherapie (DZI), Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg and Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany.
  • Schett G; Department of Internal Medicine 3 - Rheumatology and Immunology, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg and Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 80(10): 1312-1316, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1220000
Semantic information from SemMedBD (by NLM)
1. Inflammatory disorder PROCESS_OF Patients
Subject
Inflammatory disorder
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PROCESS_OF
Object
Patients
2. 2019 novel coronavirus PROCESS_OF Patients
Subject
2019 novel coronavirus
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PROCESS_OF
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Patients
3. Laboratory Procedures MEASURES SARS-CoV-2 IgG
Subject
Laboratory Procedures
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MEASURES
Object
SARS-CoV-2 IgG
4. Responsive Disease NEG_PROCESS_OF Patients
Subject
Responsive Disease
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NEG_PROCESS_OF
Object
Patients
5. antibody activity PROCESS_OF Patients
Subject
antibody activity
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PROCESS_OF
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Patients
6. Overall Response PROCESS_OF Patients
Subject
Overall Response
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Patients
7. Immunomodulatory Imide Drug ADMINISTERED_TO Patients
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Immunomodulatory Imide Drug
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ADMINISTERED_TO
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8. Inflammatory disorder PROCESS_OF Patients
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Inflammatory disorder
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PROCESS_OF
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9. 2019 novel coronavirus PROCESS_OF Patients
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2019 novel coronavirus
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10. Laboratory Procedures MEASURES SARS-CoV-2 IgG
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Laboratory Procedures
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MEASURES
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SARS-CoV-2 IgG
11. Responsive Disease NEG_PROCESS_OF Patients
Subject
Responsive Disease
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NEG_PROCESS_OF
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Patients
12. antibody activity PROCESS_OF Patients
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antibody activity
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13. Overall Response PROCESS_OF Patients
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Patients
14. Immunomodulatory Imide Drug ADMINISTERED_TO Patients
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Immunomodulatory Imide Drug
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ADMINISTERED_TO
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ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES:

To better understand the factors that influence the humoral immune response to vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 in patients with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs).

METHODS:

Patients and controls from a large COVID-19 study, with (1) no previous history of COVID-19, (2) negative baseline anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG test and (3) SARS-CoV-2 vaccination at least 10 days before serum collection were measured for anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG. Demographic, disease-specific and vaccination-specific data were recorded.

RESULTS:

Vaccination responses from 84 patients with IMID and 182 controls were analysed. While all controls developed anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG, five patients with IMID failed to develop a response (p=0.003). Moreover, 99.5% of controls but only 90.5% of patients with IMID developed neutralising antibody activity (p=0.0008). Overall responses were delayed and reduced in patients (mean (SD) 6.47 (3.14)) compared with controls (9.36 (1.85); p<0.001). Estimated marginal means (95% CI) adjusted for age, sex and time from first vaccination to sampling were 8.48 (8.12-8.85) for controls and 6.90 (6.45-7.35) for IMIDs. Significantly reduced vaccination responses pertained to untreated, conventionally and anticytokine treated patients with IMID.

CONCLUSIONS:

Immune responses against the SARS-CoV-2 are delayed and reduced in patients with IMID. This effect is based on the disease itself rather than concomitant treatment.
Subject(s)
Keywords

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Rheumatic Diseases / Immunogenicity, Vaccine / COVID-19 Vaccines / COVID-19 Topics: Vaccines Limits: Adult / Aged / Female / Humans / Male / Middle aged Language: English Journal: Ann Rheum Dis Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Annrheumdis-2021-220461

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Rheumatic Diseases / Immunogenicity, Vaccine / COVID-19 Vaccines / COVID-19 Topics: Vaccines Limits: Adult / Aged / Female / Humans / Male / Middle aged Language: English Journal: Ann Rheum Dis Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Annrheumdis-2021-220461