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Patients' Behavior Regarding Dietary or Herbal Supplements before and during COVID-19 in Saudi Arabia.
Aldwihi, Leen A; Khan, Shahd I; Alamri, Faisal F; AlRuthia, Yazed; Alqahtani, Faleh; Fantoukh, Omer I; Assiri, Ahmed; Almohammed, Omar A.
  • Aldwihi LA; Department of Clinical Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia.
  • Khan SI; Department of Clinical Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia.
  • Alamri FF; Pharmaceutical Care Department, AlNoor Specialist Hospital, Ministry of Health, Makkah 24241, Saudi Arabia.
  • AlRuthia Y; Basic Sciences Department, College of Science and Health Professions, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Jeddah 22384, Saudi Arabia.
  • Alqahtani F; King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, Jeddah 22384, Saudi Arabia.
  • Fantoukh OI; Department of Clinical Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia.
  • Assiri A; Pharmacoeconomics Research Unit, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia.
  • Almohammed OA; Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(10)2021 05 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1224022
Semantic information from SemMedBD (by NLM)
1. GJA1 gene|GJA1 COEXISTS_WITH ascorbic acid
Subject
GJA1 gene|GJA1
Predicate
COEXISTS_WITH
Object
ascorbic acid
2. Herbal Supplements USES Dietary Supplements
Subject
Herbal Supplements
Predicate
USES
Object
Dietary Supplements
3. GJA1 gene|GJA1 COEXISTS_WITH ascorbic acid
Subject
GJA1 gene|GJA1
Predicate
COEXISTS_WITH
Object
ascorbic acid
4. Herbal Supplements USES Dietary Supplements
Subject
Herbal Supplements
Predicate
USES
Object
Dietary Supplements
ABSTRACT
The use of traditional medicinal plants in Saudi Arabia stems mainly from consumers' belief in prophetic medicine. This study was conducted to explore changes in patients' use of dietary or herbal supplements among individuals infected with COVID-19 before and during infection and the association between herbal or dietary supplements and hospitalization. A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study was conducted enrolling symptomatic patients who had recently recovered from COVID-19. Data were collected through phone interviews, and McNemar's test was used to investigate changes to consumption of dietary or herbal supplements before and during infection. Multivariable logistic regression was used to investigate the association between supplements use during patients' infection and hospitalization. A total of 738 patients were included in this study, of whom 32.1% required hospitalization. About 57% of participants were male with a mean age of 36.5 (±11.9) years. The use of lemon/orange, honey, ginger, vitamin C, and black seed among participants significantly increased during their infection. In contrast, patients using anise, peppermint, and coffee peel before their infection were more likely to stop using them during their infection. In addition, using lemon/orange (p < 0.0001), honey (p = 0.0002), ginger (p = 0.0053), vitamin C (p = 0.0006), black seed (p < 0.0001), peppermint (p = 0.0027), costus (p = 0.0095), and turmeric (p = 0.0012) was significantly higher among nonhospitalized patients than hospitalized ones. However, in the multivariable logistic regression, only use of vitamin C (OR = 0.51; 95% CI 0.33-0.79), peppermint (OR = 0.53; 95% CI 0.31-0.90), and lemon/orange (OR = 0.54; 95% CI 0.33-0.88) was associated with significantly lower odds of hospitalization. The study reveals that patients' consumption of dietary or herbal supplements changed in response to their COVID-19 infection, with hospitalized patients having a lower likelihood of using these supplements. Because some supplements were associated with lower odds of hospitalization, these supplements or their bioactive components should be further investigated as feasible options for COVID-19 treatment.
Subject(s)
Keywords

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: COVID-19 Type of study: Observational study / Prognostic study / Randomized controlled trials Topics: Traditional medicine Limits: Adult / Female / Humans / Male / Middle aged / Young adult Country/Region as subject: Asia Language: English Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Ijerph18105086

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: COVID-19 Type of study: Observational study / Prognostic study / Randomized controlled trials Topics: Traditional medicine Limits: Adult / Female / Humans / Male / Middle aged / Young adult Country/Region as subject: Asia Language: English Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Ijerph18105086