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Has COVID-19 had a greater impact on female than male oncologists? Results of the ESMO Women for Oncology (W4O) Survey.
Garrido, P; Adjei, A A; Bajpai, J; Banerjee, S; Berghoff, A S; Choo, S P; Felip, E; Furness, A J S; Garralda, E; Haanen, J; Letsch, A; Linardou, H; Peters, S; Sessa, C; Tabernero, J; Tsang, J; Yang, J C-H; Garassino, M C.
  • Garrido P; Universidad de Alcalá, Medical Oncology Department, IRYCIS, Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: pilargarrido@gmail.com.
  • Adjei AA; Mayo Clinic, Rochester, USA.
  • Bajpai J; Tata Memorial Centre, Mumbai, India.
  • Banerjee S; The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Institute of Cancer Research, London, UK.
  • Berghoff AS; Division of Oncology, Department of Medicine 1, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
  • Choo SP; Curie Oncology Singapore, National Cancer Centre Singapore, Singapore.
  • Felip E; Medical Oncology Department, Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, Thoracic Oncology and H&N Cancer Unit, Vall d'Hebron Institute of Oncology (VHIO), UVic-UCC, Barcelona, Spain.
  • Furness AJS; Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.
  • Garralda E; Early Drug Development Unit, VHIO - Vall d'Hebron Institute of Oncology, HUVH - Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, Barcelona, Spain.
  • Haanen J; Division of Medical Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI), Amsterdam, Netherlands.
  • Letsch A; Department of Medicine II, Hematology and Oncology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany.
  • Linardou H; 4th Oncology Department, Metropolitan Hospital, Athens, Greece.
  • Peters S; Oncology Department - CHUV, Lausanne University, Lausanne.
  • Sessa C; Ente Ospedaliero Cantonale, Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona, Switzerland.
  • Tabernero J; Medical Oncology Department, Vall d'Hebron University Hospital (HUVH), Vall d'Hebron Institute of Oncology (VHIO), UVic-UCC, Barcelona, Spain.
  • Tsang J; Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
  • Yang JC; Department of Medical Oncology, National Taiwan University Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan.
  • Garassino MC; Thoracic Oncology Unit, Medical Department, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.
ESMO Open ; 6(3): 100131, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242977
Semantic information from SemMedBD (by NLM)
1. COVID-19 AFFECTS Woman
Subject
COVID-19
Predicate
AFFECTS
Object
Woman
2. Hospitals LOCATION_OF Task
Subject
Hospitals
Predicate
LOCATION_OF
Object
Task
3. Laboratory LOCATION_OF Task
Subject
Laboratory
Predicate
LOCATION_OF
Object
Task
4. COVID-19 AFFECTS Woman
Subject
COVID-19
Predicate
AFFECTS
Object
Woman
5. Hospitals LOCATION_OF Task
Subject
Hospitals
Predicate
LOCATION_OF
Object
Task
6. Laboratory LOCATION_OF Task
Subject
Laboratory
Predicate
LOCATION_OF
Object
Task
ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND:

European Society for Medical Oncology Women for Oncology (ESMO W4O) research has previously shown under-representation of female oncologists in leadership roles. As early reports suggested disproportionate effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on women, the ESMO W4O Committee initiated a study on the impact of the pandemic on the lives of female and male oncologists.

METHODS:

A questionnaire was sent to ESMO members and put on the ESMO website between 8 June 2020 and 2 July 2020. Questions focused on the working (hospital tasks, laboratory tasks, science) and home (household management, childcare, parent care, personal care) lives of oncologists during and after COVID-19-related lockdowns.

RESULTS:

Of 649 respondents, 541 completed the questionnaire. Of these, 58% reported that COVID-19 had affected their professional career, 83% of whom said this was in a negative way (85% of women versus 76% of men). Approximately 86% reported that COVID-19 had changed their personal life and 82% their family life. Women were again significantly more affected than men personal life (89% versus 78%; P = 0.001); family life (84% versus 77%; P = 0.037). During lockdowns, women reported increased time spent on hospital and laboratory tasks compared with men (53% versus 46% and 33% versus 26%, respectively) and a significantly higher proportion of women than men spent less time on science (39% versus 25%) and personal care (58% versus 39%). After confinement, this trend remained for science (42% versus 23%) and personal care (55% versus 36%).

CONCLUSIONS:

The COVID-19 pandemic has adversely affected the professional and home lives of oncologists, especially women. Reduced research time for female oncologists may have long-lasting career consequences, especially for those at key stages in their career. The gender gap for promotion to leadership positions may widen further as a result of the pandemic.
Subject(s)
Keywords

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: COVID-19 Type of study: Experimental Studies / Observational study / Prognostic study / Randomized controlled trials Limits: Adult / Female / Humans / Male / Middle aged / Young adult Language: English Journal: ESMO Open Year: 2021 Document Type: Article

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: COVID-19 Type of study: Experimental Studies / Observational study / Prognostic study / Randomized controlled trials Limits: Adult / Female / Humans / Male / Middle aged / Young adult Language: English Journal: ESMO Open Year: 2021 Document Type: Article