Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Lockdown-Related Disparities Experienced by People with Disabilities during the First Wave of the COVID-19 Pandemic: Scoping Review with Thematic Analysis.
Jesus, Tiago S; Bhattacharjya, Sutanuka; Papadimitriou, Christina; Bogdanova, Yelena; Bentley, Jacob; Arango-Lasprilla, Juan Carlos; Kamalakannan, Sureshkumar.
  • Jesus TS; Global Health and Tropical Medicine (GHTM) & WHO Collaborating Centre for Health Workforce Policy and Planning, Institute of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, NOVA University of Lisbon, 1349-008 Lisbon, Portugal.
  • Bhattacharjya S; Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA.
  • Papadimitriou C; Department of Occupational Therapy, Byrdine F. Lewis College of Nursing and Health Professions, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303, USA.
  • Bogdanova Y; Departments of Interdisciplinary Health Sciences, and Sociology, School of Health Sciences, Oakland University, Rochester, MI 48309-4452, USA.
  • Bentley J; Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Service, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA 02130, USA.
  • Arango-Lasprilla JC; Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Boston University, Boston, MA 02130, USA.
  • Kamalakannan S; Department of Clinical Psychology, Seattle Pacific University, Seattle, WA 98119, USA.
  • The Refugee Empowerment Task Force International Networking Group Of The American Congress Of Rehabilitation Medicine; Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, School of Medicine, John Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21205-2196, USA.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(12)2021 Jun 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259503
ABSTRACT
People with disabilities may be disproportionally affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. We synthesize the literature on broader health and social impacts on people with disabilities arising from lockdown-related measures.

METHODS:

Scoping review with thematic analysis. Up to mid-September 2020, seven scientific databases and three pre-print servers were searched to identify empirical or perspective papers addressing lockdown-related disparities experienced by people with disabilities. Snowballing searches and experts' consultation also occurred. Two independent reviewers took eligibility decisions and performed data extractions.

RESULTS:

Out of 1026 unique references, 85 addressed lockdown-related disparities experienced by people with disabilities. Ten primary and two central themes were identified (1) Disrupted access to healthcare (other than for COVID-19); (2) Reduced physical activity leading to health and functional decline; (3) From physical distance and inactivity to social isolation and loneliness; (4) Disruption of personal assistance and community support networks; (5) Children with disabilities disproportionally affected by school closures; (6) Psychological consequences of disrupted routines, activities, and support; (7) Family and informal caregiver burden and stress; (8) Risks of maltreatment, violence, and self-harm; (9) Reduced employment and/or income exacerbating disparities; and (10) Digital divide in access to health, education, and support services. Lack of disability-inclusive response and emergency preparedness and structural, pre-pandemic disparities were the central themes.

CONCLUSIONS:

Lockdown-related measures to contain the COVID-19 pandemic can disproportionally affect people with disabilities with broader impact on their health and social grounds. Lack of disability-inclusive response and emergency preparedness and pre-pandemic disparities created structural disadvantages, exacerbated during the pandemic. Both structural disparities and their pandemic ramifications require the development and implementation of disability-inclusive public health and policy measures.
Subject(s)
Keywords

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Disabled Persons / COVID-19 Type of study: Reviews Limits: Child / Humans Language: English Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Ijerph18126178

Similar

MEDLINE

...
LILACS

LIS


Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Disabled Persons / COVID-19 Type of study: Reviews Limits: Child / Humans Language: English Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: Ijerph18126178