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Comparison of SARS-CoV-2 Antibody Responses and Seroconversion in COVID-19 Patients Using Twelve Commercial Immunoassays.
Yun, Sojeong; Ryu, Ji Hyeong; Jang, Joo Hee; Bae, Hyunjoo; Yoo, Seung-Hyo; Choi, Ae-Ran; Jo, Sung Jin; Lim, Jihyang; Lee, Jehoon; Ryu, Hyejin; Cho, Sung-Yeon; Lee, Dong-Gun; Lee, Jongmin; Kim, Seok Chan; Park, Yeon-Joon; Lee, Hyeyoung; Oh, Eun-Jee.
  • Yun S; Department of Biomedicine & Health Sciences, Graduate School, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.
  • Ryu JH; Department of Laboratory Medicine, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.
  • Jang JH; Department of Biomedicine & Health Sciences, Graduate School, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.
  • Bae H; Department of Biomedicine & Health Sciences, Graduate School, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.
  • Yoo SH; Department of Laboratory Medicine, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.
  • Choi AR; Department of Laboratory Medicine, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.
  • Jo SJ; Department of Laboratory Medicine, Eunpyeong St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.
  • Lim J; Department of Laboratory Medicine, Eunpyeong St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.
  • Lee J; Department of Laboratory Medicine, Eunpyeong St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.
  • Ryu H; Samkwang Medical Laboratories, Seoul, Korea.
  • Cho SY; Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.
  • Lee DG; Vaccine Bio Research Institute, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.
  • Lee J; Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.
  • Kim SC; Vaccine Bio Research Institute, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.
  • Park YJ; Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.
  • Lee H; Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.
  • Oh EJ; Department of Laboratory Medicine, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.
Ann Lab Med ; 41(6): 577-587, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1264321
Semantic information from SemMedBD (by NLM)
1. COVID-19 PROCESS_OF Patients
Subject
COVID-19
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Patients
2. Antibody Formation PROCESS_OF Patients
Subject
Antibody Formation
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Patients
3. Assay USES Antibodies
Subject
Assay
Predicate
USES
Object
Antibodies
4. Assay USES Antibodie
Subject
Assay
Predicate
USES
Object
Antibodie
5. Assay USES immunoglobulin
Subject
Assay
Predicate
USES
Object
immunoglobulin
6. Assay DIAGNOSES COVID-19
Subject
Assay
Predicate
DIAGNOSES
Object
COVID-19
7. Severe disease PROCESS_OF Patients
Subject
Severe disease
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Patients
8. Antibodies PART_OF 2019 novel coronavirus
Subject
Antibodies
Predicate
PART_OF
Object
2019 novel coronavirus
9. Antibodies INTERACTS_WITH Antigens
Subject
Antibodies
Predicate
INTERACTS_WITH
Object
Antigens
10. COVID-19 PROCESS_OF Patients
Subject
COVID-19
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Patients
11. Antibody Formation PROCESS_OF Patients
Subject
Antibody Formation
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Patients
12. Assay USES Antibodies
Subject
Assay
Predicate
USES
Object
Antibodies
13. Assay USES Antibodies, Blocking
Subject
Assay
Predicate
USES
Object
Antibodies, Blocking
14. Assay USES immunoglobulin A, human
Subject
Assay
Predicate
USES
Object
immunoglobulin A, human
15. Assay DIAGNOSES COVID-19
Subject
Assay
Predicate
DIAGNOSES
Object
COVID-19
16. Severe disease PROCESS_OF Patients
Subject
Severe disease
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Patients
17. Antibodies PART_OF 2019 novel coronavirus
Subject
Antibodies
Predicate
PART_OF
Object
2019 novel coronavirus
18. Antibodies INTERACTS_WITH Antigens
Subject
Antibodies
Predicate
INTERACTS_WITH
Object
Antigens
ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND:

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) antibody assays have high clinical utility in managing the pandemic. We compared antibody responses and seroconversion of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients using different immunoassays.

METHODS:

We evaluated 12 commercial immunoassays, including three automated chemiluminescent immunoassays (Abbott, Roche, and Siemens), three enzyme immunoassays (Bio-Rad, Euroimmun, and Vircell), five lateral flow immunoassays (Boditech Med, SD biosensor, PCL, Sugentech, and Rapigen), and one surrogate neutralizing antibody assay (GenScript) in sequential samples from 49 COVID-19 patients and 10 seroconversion panels.

RESULTS:

The positive percent agreement (PPA) of assays for a COVID-19 diagnosis ranged from 84.0% to 98.5% for all samples (>14 days after symptom onset), with IgM or IgA assays showing higher PPAs. Seroconversion responses varied across the assay type and disease severity. Assays targeting the spike or receptor-binding domain protein showed a tendency for early seroconversion detection and higher index values in patients with severe disease. Index values from SARS-CoV-2 binding antibody assays (three automated assays, one LFIA, and three EIAs) showed moderate to strong correlations with the neutralizing antibody percentage (r=0.517-0.874), and stronger correlations in patients with severe disease and in assays targeting spike protein. Agreement among the 12 assays was good (74.3%-96.4%) for detecting IgG or total antibodies.

CONCLUSIONS:

Positivity rates and seroconversion of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies vary depending on the assay kits, disease severity, and antigen target. This study contributes to a better understanding of antibody response in symptomatic COVID-19 patients using currently available assays.
Subject(s)
Keywords

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: COVID-19 Testing / SARS-CoV-2 / COVID-19 / Antibodies, Viral Type of study: Diagnostic study Topics: Variants Limits: Humans Language: English Journal: Ann Lab Med Year: 2021 Document Type: Article

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: COVID-19 Testing / SARS-CoV-2 / COVID-19 / Antibodies, Viral Type of study: Diagnostic study Topics: Variants Limits: Humans Language: English Journal: Ann Lab Med Year: 2021 Document Type: Article