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The UPTAKE study: a cross-sectional survey examining the insights and beliefs of the UK population on COVID-19 vaccine uptake and hesitancy.
Sethi, Sonika; Kumar, Aditi; Mandal, Anandadeep; Shaikh, Mohammed; Hall, Claire A; Kirk, Jeremy M W; Moss, Paul; Brookes, Matthew J; Basu, Supratik.
  • Sethi S; Department of Gastroenterology and Haematology, Royal Wolverhampton Hospitals NHS Trust, Wolverhampton, UK sonika.sethi1@nhs.net.
  • Kumar A; Department of Gastroenterology and Haematology, Royal Wolverhampton Hospitals NHS Trust, Wolverhampton, UK.
  • Mandal A; University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
  • Shaikh M; NIHR Clinical Research Network West Midlands, West Midlands, UK.
  • Hall CA; NIHR Clinical Research Network West Midlands, West Midlands, UK.
  • Kirk JMW; NIHR Clinical Research Network West Midlands, West Midlands, UK.
  • Moss P; University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
  • Brookes MJ; Department of Gastroenterology and Haematology, Royal Wolverhampton Hospitals NHS Trust, Wolverhampton, UK.
  • Basu S; Research Institute in Healthcare Sciences, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, UK.
BMJ Open ; 11(6): e048856, 2021 06 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270894
Semantic information from SemMedBD (by NLM)
1. Services METHOD_OF general practice (field)
Subject
Services
Predicate
METHOD_OF
Object
general practice (field)
2. Vaccines NEG_ADMINISTERED_TO Respondents
Subject
Vaccines
Predicate
NEG_ADMINISTERED_TO
Object
Respondents
3. Vaccines ADMINISTERED_TO Asians
Subject
Vaccines
Predicate
ADMINISTERED_TO
Object
Asians
4. Services METHOD_OF general practice (field)
Subject
Services
Predicate
METHOD_OF
Object
general practice (field)
5. Vaccines NEG_ADMINISTERED_TO Respondents
Subject
Vaccines
Predicate
NEG_ADMINISTERED_TO
Object
Respondents
6. Vaccines ADMINISTERED_TO Asians
Subject
Vaccines
Predicate
ADMINISTERED_TO
Object
Asians
ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE:

A key challenge towards a successful COVID-19 vaccine uptake is vaccine hesitancy. We examine and provide novel insights on the key drivers and barriers towards COVID-19 vaccine uptake.

DESIGN:

This study involved an anonymous cross-sectional online survey circulated across the UK in September 2020. The survey was designed to include several sections to collect demographic data and responses on (1) extent of agreement regarding various statements about COVID-19 and vaccinations, (2) previous vaccination habits (eg, if they had previously declined vaccination) and (3) interest in participation in vaccine trials. Multinominal logistic models examined demographic factors that may impact vaccine uptake. We used principle component analysis and text mining to explore perception related to vaccine uptake.

SETTING:

The survey was circulated through various media, including posts on social media networks (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Instagram), national radio, news articles, Clinical Research Network website and newsletter, and through 150 West Midlands general practices via a text messaging service.

PARTICIPANTS:

There were a total of 4884 respondents of which 9.44% were black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) group. The majority were women (n=3416, 69.9%) and of white ethnicity (n=4127, 84.5%).

RESULTS:

Regarding respondents, overall, 3873 (79.3%) were interested in taking approved COVID-19 vaccines, while 677 (13.9%) were unsure, and 334 (6.8%) would not take a vaccine. Participants aged over 70 years old (OR=4.63) and the BAME community (OR=5.48) were more likely to take an approved vaccine. Smokers (OR=0.45) and respondents with no known illness (OR=0.70) were less likely to accept approved vaccines. The study identified 16 key reasons for not accepting approved vaccines, the most common (60%) being the possibility of the COVID-19 vaccine having side effects.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study provides an insight into focusing on specific populations to reduce vaccine hesitancy. This proves crucial in managing the COVID-19 pandemic.
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Keywords

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Document Type: Article Main subject: Vaccines / COVID-19 Subject: Vaccines / COVID-19 Type of study: Prevalence study / Prognostic study / Risk factors Language: English Journal: BMJ Open Year: 2021

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Document Type: Article Main subject: Vaccines / COVID-19 Subject: Vaccines / COVID-19 Type of study: Prevalence study / Prognostic study / Risk factors Language: English Journal: BMJ Open Year: 2021
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