Your browser doesn't support javascript.
COVID-19 related substance use services policy changes: Policymaker perspectives on policy development & implementation.
Henry, Brandy F; Campbell, Aimee; Hunt, Timothy; Johnson, Jessica K; Mandavia, Amar D; Chaple, Michael; Arout, Caroline; Wu, Elwin; Pincus, Harold A; Nunes, Edward V; Lincourt, Pat; Levin, Frances R; El-Bassel, Nabila.
  • Henry BF; Columbia University School of Social Work, 1255 Amsterdam Ave., New York, NY 10027, United States of America; College of Education, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 16802 United States of America. Electronic address: bhenry@brandeis.edu.
  • Campbell A; Clinical Psychiatric Social Work at Columbia University Irving Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry and Research Scientist at New York State Psychiatric Institute in the Division on Substance Use Disorders, 1051 Riverside Drive, New York, NY 10032, United States of America. Electronic address: a
  • Hunt T; Columbia University School of Social Work, 1255 Amsterdam Ave., New York, NY 10027, United States of America. Electronic address: th2258@columbia.edu.
  • Johnson JK; Columbia University School of Social Work, 1255 Amsterdam Ave., New York, NY 10027, United States of America. Electronic address: jlk2227@columbia.edu.
  • Mandavia AD; Columbia University Teachers College, 525 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027, United States of America. Electronic address: adm2183@tc.columbia.edu.
  • Chaple M; Division on Substance Use Disorders New York State Psychiatric Institute, Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, 1051 Riverside Drive, New York, NY 10032, United States of America. Electronic address: Michael.Chaple@nyspi.columbia.edu.
  • Arout C; Clinical Neurobiology, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York State Psychiatric Institute, 1051 Riverside Drive, New York, NY 10032, United States of America. Electronic address: Caroline.Arout@nyspi.columbia.edu.
  • Wu E; Columbia University School of Social Work, 1255 Amsterdam Ave., New York, NY 10027, United States of America. Electronic address: ew157@columbia.edu.
  • Pincus HA; Department of Psychiatry, Irving Institute for Clinical and Translational Research, Columbia University, RAND Corporation, 1051 Riverside Drive, New York, NY 10032, United States of America. Electronic address: Harold.Pincus@nyspi.columbia.edu.
  • Nunes EV; Columbia University Irving Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry, Division on Substance Use Disorders, New York State Psychiatric Institute, 1051 Riverside Drive, New York, NY 10032, United States of America. Electronic address: edward.nunes@nyspi.columbia.edu.
  • Lincourt P; Addiction Treatment and Recovery Division, Office of Addiction Services and Supports, 1450 Western Ave, Albany, NY 12203, United States of America. Electronic address: Pat.Lincourt@oasas.ny.gov.
  • Levin FR; Columbia University Irving Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry, Division on Substance Use Disorders, New York State Psychiatric Institute, 1051 Riverside Drive, New York, NY 10032, United States of America. Electronic address: Frances.Levin@nyspi.columbia.edu.
  • El-Bassel N; Columbia University School of Social Work, 1255 Amsterdam Ave., New York, NY 10027, United States of America. Electronic address: ne5@columbia.edu.
J Subst Abuse Treat ; 133: 108550, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1284257
ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION:

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, regulations for substance use services changed to accommodate stay-at-home orders and physical distancing guidelines.

METHODS:

Using in-depth interviews (N = 14) and framework analysis, we describe how policymakers developed, adopted, and implemented regulations governing services for substance use disorders during COVID-19, and how policymakers' perceived the impacts of these regulations in New York State.

RESULTS:

During the COVID-19 pandemic, policymakers shifted to more inclusive approaches of knowledge generation and co-production of recommendations. Barriers to adoption and implementation of new regulations included medication/services supply, lack of integration, stigma, and overcriminalization.

CONCLUSION:

Findings from this study highlight the potential feasibility and benefits of co-produced policies for substance use services and the need for consistent service supply, better integration with health care services, reduced stigma, improved funding structures, best practice guidelines, criminal justice reform, and harm reduction support. These considerations should inform future policy maintenance and modifications to substance use services related to COVID-19.
Subject(s)
Keywords

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Substance-Related Disorders / COVID-19 Type of study: Clinical Practice Guide / Prognostic study / Qualitative research Limits: Humans Language: English Journal: J Subst Abuse Treat Journal subject: Substance-Related Disorders Year: 2022 Document Type: Article

Similar

MEDLINE

...
LILACS

LIS


Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Substance-Related Disorders / COVID-19 Type of study: Clinical Practice Guide / Prognostic study / Qualitative research Limits: Humans Language: English Journal: J Subst Abuse Treat Journal subject: Substance-Related Disorders Year: 2022 Document Type: Article