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Association between COVID-19-related loneliness or worry and symptoms of anxiety and depression among first-year college students.
Mehus, Christopher J; Lyden, Grace R; Bonar, Erin E; Gunlicks-Stoessel, Meredith; Morrell, Nicole; Parks, Michael J; Wagner, Anna C; Patrick, Megan E.
  • Mehus CJ; Institute for Translational Research in Children's Mental Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.
  • Lyden GR; Division of Biostatistics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.
  • Bonar EE; Addiction Center and Department of Psychiatry and Injury Prevention Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.
  • Gunlicks-Stoessel M; Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.
  • Morrell N; Institute for Translational Research in Children's Mental Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.
  • Parks MJ; Institute for Translational Research in Children's Mental Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.
  • Wagner AC; Institute for Translational Research in Children's Mental Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.
  • Patrick ME; Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.
J Am Coll Health ; : 1-6, 2021 Jul 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1303838
ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the relationship between COVID-19-related distress and mental health among first-year college students.

PARTICIPANTS:

Data for this longitudinal study (n = 727) were collected before the school year (August 2019), end of fall semester (December 2019), and soon after the university suspended in-person instruction (April 2020).

METHODS:

We used multivariable log-linear and logistic regressions to examine continuous and dichotomous outcomes on the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire and the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale.

RESULTS:

The most consistent predictor of during-pandemic mental health was feeling extremely isolated (versus not at all), which was associated with increased symptom severity of depression (proportional change[95% CI] = 2.43[1.87, 3.15]) and anxiety (2.02[1.50, 2.73]) and greater odds of new moderate depression (OR[95% CI] = 14.83[3.00, 73.41]) and anxiety (24.74[2.91, 210.00]). Greater COVID-19-related concern was also related to increased mental health symptoms.

CONCLUSIONS:

Results highlight the need for mental health services during crises that lead to social isolation.
Keywords

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Type of study: Cohort study / Observational study / Prognostic study Language: English Journal: J Am Coll Health Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: 07448481.2021.1942009

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Type of study: Cohort study / Observational study / Prognostic study Language: English Journal: J Am Coll Health Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: 07448481.2021.1942009