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Neutralisation of SARS-CoV-2 lineage P.1 by antibodies elicited through natural SARS-CoV-2 infection or vaccination with an inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine: an immunological study.
Souza, William M; Amorim, Mariene R; Sesti-Costa, Renata; Coimbra, Lais D; Brunetti, Natalia S; Toledo-Teixeira, Daniel A; de Souza, Gabriela F; Muraro, Stefanie P; Parise, Pierina L; Barbosa, Priscilla P; Bispo-Dos-Santos, Karina; Mofatto, Luciana S; Simeoni, Camila L; Claro, Ingra M; Duarte, Adriana S S; Coletti, Thais M; Zangirolami, Audrey B; Costa-Lima, Carolina; Gomes, Arilson B S P; Buscaratti, Lucas I; Sales, Flavia C; Costa, Vitor A; Franco, Lucas A M; Candido, Darlan S; Pybus, Oliver G; de Jesus, Jaqueline G; Silva, Camila A M; Ramundo, Mariana S; Ferreira, Giulia M; Pinho, Mariana C; Souza, Leandro M; Rocha, Esmenia C; Andrade, Pamela S; Crispim, Myuki A E; Maktura, Grazielle C; Manuli, Erika R; Santos, Magnun N N; Camilo, Cecilia C; Angerami, Rodrigo N; Moretti, Maria L; Spilki, Fernando R; Arns, Clarice W; Addas-Carvalho, Marcelo; Benites, Bruno D; Vinolo, Marco A R; Mori, Marcelo A S; Gaburo, Nelson; Dye, Christopher; Marques-Souza, Henrique; Marques, Rafael E.
  • Souza WM; Virology Research Centre, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil.
  • Amorim MR; Laboratory of Emerging Viruses, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil.
  • Sesti-Costa R; Brazilian Biosciences National Laboratory, Brazilian Centre for Research in Energy and Materials, Campinas, Brazil.
  • Coimbra LD; Hematology and Hemotherapy Center, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil.
  • Brunetti NS; Brazilian Biosciences National Laboratory, Brazilian Centre for Research in Energy and Materials, Campinas, Brazil.
  • Toledo-Teixeira DA; Autoimmune Research Laboratory, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil.
  • de Souza GF; Laboratory of Emerging Viruses, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil.
  • Muraro SP; Laboratory of Emerging Viruses, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil.
  • Parise PL; Laboratory of Emerging Viruses, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil.
  • Barbosa PP; Laboratory of Emerging Viruses, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil.
  • Bispo-Dos-Santos K; Laboratory of Emerging Viruses, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil.
  • Mofatto LS; Laboratory of Emerging Viruses, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil.
  • Simeoni CL; Laboratory of Emerging Viruses, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil.
  • Claro IM; Laboratory of Emerging Viruses, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil.
  • Duarte ASS; Tropical Medicine Institute, Medical School, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
  • Coletti TM; Department of Infectious and Parasitic Disease, Medical School, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
  • Zangirolami AB; Hematology and Hemotherapy Center, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil.
  • Costa-Lima C; Tropical Medicine Institute, Medical School, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
  • Gomes ABSP; Hematology and Hemotherapy Center, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil.
  • Buscaratti LI; Hematology and Hemotherapy Center, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil.
  • Sales FC; Laboratory of Immunoinflammation, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil.
  • Costa VA; Brazilian Laboratory on Silencing Technologies, Department of Biochemistry and Tissue Biology, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil.
  • Franco LAM; Tropical Medicine Institute, Medical School, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
  • Candido DS; Department of Infectious and Parasitic Disease, Medical School, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
  • Pybus OG; Hematology and Transfusion Medicine Center, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil.
  • de Jesus JG; Tropical Medicine Institute, Medical School, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
  • Silva CAM; Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, UK.
  • Ramundo MS; Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, UK.
  • Ferreira GM; Tropical Medicine Institute, Medical School, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
  • Pinho MC; Tropical Medicine Institute, Medical School, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
  • Souza LM; Tropical Medicine Institute, Medical School, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
  • Rocha EC; Hematology and Transfusion Medicine Center, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil.
  • Andrade PS; Tropical Medicine Institute, Medical School, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
  • Crispim MAE; Laboratory of Virology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Federal University of Uberlândia, Uberlândia, Brazil.
  • Maktura GC; Tropical Medicine Institute, Medical School, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
  • Manuli ER; Tropical Medicine Institute, Medical School, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
  • Santos MNN; Tropical Medicine Institute, Medical School, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
  • Camilo CC; Tropical Medicine Institute, Medical School, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
  • Angerami RN; School of Public Health, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
  • Moretti ML; Fundação Hospitalar de Hematologia e Hemoterapia do Amazonas, Manaus, Brazil.
  • Spilki FR; Brazilian Laboratory on Silencing Technologies, Department of Biochemistry and Tissue Biology, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil.
  • Arns CW; Tropical Medicine Institute, Medical School, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
  • Addas-Carvalho M; Department of Infectious and Parasitic Disease, Medical School, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
  • Benites BD; Department of Clinical Pathology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil.
  • Vinolo MAR; CDL Laboratório Santos e Vidal, Manaus, Brazil.
  • Mori MAS; Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil.
  • Gaburo N; Campinas Department of Public Health Surveillance, Campinas, Brazil.
  • Dye C; Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil.
  • Marques-Souza H; One Health Laboratory, Feevale University, Novo Hamburgo, Brazil.
  • Marques RE; Animal Virology Laboratory, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil.
Lancet Microbe ; 2(10): e527-e535, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1307293
ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND:

Mutations accrued by SARS-CoV-2 lineage P.1-first detected in Brazil in early January, 2021-include amino acid changes in the receptor-binding domain of the viral spike protein that also are reported in other variants of concern, including B.1.1.7 and B.1.351. We aimed to investigate whether isolates of wild-type P.1 lineage SARS-CoV-2 can escape from neutralising antibodies generated by a polyclonal immune response.

METHODS:

We did an immunological study to assess the neutralising effects of antibodies on lineage P.1 and lineage B isolates of SARS-CoV-2, using plasma samples from patients previously infected with or vaccinated against SARS-CoV-2. Two specimens (P.1/28 and P.1/30) containing SARS-CoV-2 lineage P.1 (as confirmed by viral genome sequencing) were obtained from nasopharyngeal and bronchoalveolar lavage samples collected from patients in Manaus, Brazil, and compared against an isolate of SARS-CoV-2 lineage B (SARS.CoV2/SP02.2020) recovered from a patient in Brazil in February, 2020. Isolates were incubated with plasma samples from 21 blood donors who had previously had COVID-19 and from a total of 53 recipients of the chemically inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine CoronaVac 18 individuals after receipt of a single dose and an additional 20 individuals (38 in total) after receipt of two doses (collected 17-38 days after the most recent dose); and 15 individuals who received two doses during the phase 3 trial of the vaccine (collected 134-230 days after the second dose). Antibody neutralisation of P.1/28, P.1/30, and B isolates by plasma samples were compared in terms of median virus neutralisation titre (VNT50, defined as the reciprocal value of the sample dilution that showed 50% protection against cytopathic effects).

FINDINGS:

In terms of VNT50, plasma from individuals previously infected with SARS-CoV-2 had an 8·6 times lower neutralising capacity against the P.1 isolates (median VNT50 30 [IQR <20-45] for P.1/28 and 30 [<20-40] for P.1/30) than against the lineage B isolate (260 [160-400]), with a binominal model showing significant reductions in lineage P.1 isolates compared with the lineage B isolate (p≤0·0001). Efficient neutralisation of P.1 isolates was not seen with plasma samples collected from individuals vaccinated with a first dose of CoronaVac 20-23 days earlier (VNT50s below the limit of detection [<20] for most plasma samples), a second dose 17-38 days earlier (median VNT50 24 [IQR <20-25] for P.1/28 and 28 [<20-25] for P.1/30), or a second dose 134-260 days earlier (all VNT50s below limit of detection). Median VNT50s against the lineage B isolate were 20 (IQR 20-30) after a first dose of CoronaVac 20-23 days earlier, 75 (<20-263) after a second dose 17-38 days earlier, and 20 (<20-30) after a second dose 134-260 days earlier. In plasma collected 17-38 days after a second dose of CoronaVac, neutralising capacity against both P.1 isolates was significantly decreased (p=0·0051 for P.1/28 and p=0·0336 for P.1/30) compared with that against the lineage B isolate. All data were corroborated by results obtained through plaque reduction neutralisation tests.

INTERPRETATION:

SARS-CoV-2 lineage P.1 might escape neutralisation by antibodies generated in response to polyclonal stimulation against previously circulating variants of SARS-CoV-2. Continuous genomic surveillance of SARS-CoV-2 combined with antibody neutralisation assays could help to guide national immunisation programmes.

FUNDING:

São Paulo Research Foundation, Brazilian Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation and Funding Authority for Studies, Medical Research Council, National Council for Scientific and Technological Development, National Institutes of Health. TRANSLATION For the Portuguese translation of the abstract see Supplementary Materials section.
Subject(s)

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: SARS-CoV-2 / COVID-19 Type of study: Prognostic study / Randomized controlled trials Topics: Vaccines / Variants Limits: Humans Country/Region as subject: North America / South America / Brazil Language: English Journal: Lancet Microbe Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: S2666-5247(21)00129-4

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: SARS-CoV-2 / COVID-19 Type of study: Prognostic study / Randomized controlled trials Topics: Vaccines / Variants Limits: Humans Country/Region as subject: North America / South America / Brazil Language: English Journal: Lancet Microbe Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: S2666-5247(21)00129-4