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Impact of mental health on disease activity in mastocytosis during COVID-19 pandemic.
Öztop, Nida; Demir, Semra; Beyaz, Sengül; Ünal, Derya; Çolakoglu, Bahauddin; Büyüköztürk, Suna; Gelincik, Asli.
  • Öztop N; Division of Immunology and Allergic Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Istanbul Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey.
  • Demir S; Division of Immunology and Allergic Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Istanbul Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey.
  • Beyaz S; Division of Immunology and Allergic Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Istanbul Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey.
  • Ünal D; Division of Immunology and Allergic Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Yedikule Education and Training Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.
  • Çolakoglu B; Division of Immunology and Allergic Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Istanbul Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey.
  • Büyüköztürk S; Division of Immunology and Allergic Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Istanbul Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey.
  • Gelincik A; Division of Immunology and Allergic Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Istanbul Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey. Electronic address: gelincikasli@hotmail.com.
Allergol Int ; 71(1): 109-116, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347475
ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND:

Mast cell-related symptoms might be influenced by mental health status in mastocytosis. In this study, we aimed to investigate the influence of mental health problems developed during the COVID-19 pandemic on the course of mastocytosis.

METHODS:

Mental health status in 60 adult patients with mastocytosis was prospectively evaluated with the total Depression-Anxiety-Stress Scale (tDASS-21) and Fear of COVID-19 Scale (FCV-19S) in the lockdown period (LP) and the return to normal period (RTNP) during the pandemic. The disease course was assessed from emergency and outpatient medical reports, including Scoring Mastocytosis (SCORMA) index and serum baseline tryptase levels, by telephone interviews and clinical visits.

RESULTS:

The mean FCV-19S and median tDASS-21 scores were significantly higher in LP than RTNP (p < 0.001) and there was a positive correlation between FCV-19S and tDASS-21 in LP (r = 0.820, p < 0.001) and in RTNP (r = 0.572 p= <0.001). Disease-related symptoms including skin lesions, flushing and anaphylaxis attacks increased in 22 patients in LP, and in this group, mean FCV-19S and median tDASS-21 were higher than those without symptom exacerbation (p < 0.001). During the study period, four (6.7%) patients who experienced COVID-19 recovered without any requirement for hospitalization and had not experienced symptom exacerbation.

CONCLUSIONS:

Fear of COVID-19 can be a reason for mental health changes, including depression, anxiety and stress which may further increase mast cell-related symptoms. Therefore, psychological support is important to control the severity of mast cell-related symptoms in mastocytosis during a pandemic.
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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Mastocytosis / Mental Health / SARS-CoV-2 / COVID-19 Type of study: Observational study / Risk factors Topics: Long Covid Limits: Adult / Aged / Female / Humans / Male / Middle aged / Young adult Language: English Journal: Allergol Int Journal subject: Allergy and Immunology Year: 2022 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: J.alit.2021.08.002

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Mastocytosis / Mental Health / SARS-CoV-2 / COVID-19 Type of study: Observational study / Risk factors Topics: Long Covid Limits: Adult / Aged / Female / Humans / Male / Middle aged / Young adult Language: English Journal: Allergol Int Journal subject: Allergy and Immunology Year: 2022 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: J.alit.2021.08.002