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Exploring the relationship between the COVID-19 pandemic and changes in travel behaviour: A qualitative study.
Yang, Yilin; Cao, Mengqiu; Cheng, Long; Zhai, Keyu; Zhao, Xu; De Vos, Jonas.
  • Yang Y; Bartlett School of Planning, University College London, London WC1H 0NN, United Kingdom.
  • Cao M; School of Architecture and Cities, University of Westminster, London NW1 5LS, United Kingdom.
  • Cheng L; Department of Statistics, London School of Economics and Political Science, London WC2A 2AE, United Kingdom.
  • Zhai K; Geography Department, Ghent University, Ghent 9000, Belgium.
  • Zhao X; School of Foreign Studies, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 223800, PR China.
  • De Vos J; Faculty of Business, University of Greenwich, London SE10 9LS, United Kingdom.
Transp Res Interdiscip Perspect ; 11: 100450, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1364500
ABSTRACT
During the COVID-19 crisis, a series of measures were taken to restrict travel and social activities outside the home in order to curb the pandemic and ameliorate its negative effects. These unprecedented measures have had a profound impact on the number and purposes of trips and modes of travel. In China, although the pandemic is now generally under control and transport availability has returned to nearly normal, the extent of the changes in travel behaviour wrought during and after the pandemic still remains unclear. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to investigate the differences in individual travel behaviours during and after the COVID-19 pandemic, using Huzhou as an example. Semi-structured interviews were used to examine the influence of COVID-19 on the travel behaviour and perceptions of different groups. The results indicate that, initially, travel demand was greatly reduced. Second, decreased travel reduced participation in activities, which can have adverse effects on people's health as well as their subjective well-being. Third, the degree and duration of such impacts varied from person to person. Students, lower income cohorts, groups living in small communities with insufficient green spaces, and those working in tourism, catering, informal businesses and transport-related sectors were more vulnerable than others. Policymakers, urban and transport planners should therefore pay attention to the social inequities that arise from unequal access to transport and heterogeneity between individuals. Additionally, public transport systems require further development to promote social cohesion.
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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Type of study: Qualitative research / Randomized controlled trials Language: English Journal: Transp Res Interdiscip Perspect Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: J.trip.2021.100450

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Type of study: Qualitative research / Randomized controlled trials Language: English Journal: Transp Res Interdiscip Perspect Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: J.trip.2021.100450