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Compromised SARS-CoV-2-specific placental antibody transfer.
Atyeo, Caroline; Pullen, Krista M; Bordt, Evan A; Fischinger, Stephanie; Burke, John; Michell, Ashlin; Slein, Matthew D; Loos, Carolin; Shook, Lydia L; Boatin, Adeline A; Yockey, Laura J; Pepin, David; Meinsohn, Marie-Charlotte; Nguyen, Ngoc Minh Phuong; Chauvin, Maeva; Roberts, Drucilla; Goldfarb, Ilona T; Matute, Juan D; James, Kaitlyn E; Yonker, Lael M; Bebell, Lisa M; Kaimal, Anjali J; Gray, Kathryn J; Lauffenburger, Douglas; Edlow, Andrea G; Alter, Galit.
  • Atyeo C; Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA; PhD Program in Virology, Division of Medical Sciences, Harvard University, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
  • Pullen KM; Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.
  • Bordt EA; Department of Pediatrics, Lurie Center for Autism, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
  • Fischinger S; Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA; PhD Program in Immunology and Virology, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen 47057, Germany.
  • Burke J; Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.
  • Michell A; Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.
  • Slein MD; Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.
  • Loos C; Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA; Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.
  • Shook LL; Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
  • Boatin AA; Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
  • Yockey LJ; Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
  • Pepin D; Pediatric Surgical Research Laboratories, Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
  • Meinsohn MC; Pediatric Surgical Research Laboratories, Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
  • Nguyen NMP; Pediatric Surgical Research Laboratories, Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
  • Chauvin M; Pediatric Surgical Research Laboratories, Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
  • Roberts D; Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
  • Goldfarb IT; Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
  • Matute JD; Department of Pediatrics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
  • James KE; Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
  • Yonker LM; Department of Pediatrics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
  • Bebell LM; Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, MGH Global Health, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
  • Kaimal AJ; Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
  • Gray KJ; Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
  • Lauffenburger D; Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.
  • Edlow AG; Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Vincent Center for Reproductive Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. Electronic address: aedlow@mgh.harvard.edu.
  • Alter G; Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Electronic address: galter@mgh.harvard.edu.
Cell ; 184(3): 628-642.e10, 2021 02 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1385216
Semantic information from SemMedBD (by NLM)
1. Severe disease PROCESS_OF Pregnant Women
Subject
Severe disease
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Pregnant Women
2. Placenta LOCATION_OF Specific antibody
Subject
Placenta
Predicate
LOCATION_OF
Object
Specific antibody
3. Plasma LOCATION_OF Specific antibody
Subject
Plasma
Predicate
LOCATION_OF
Object
Specific antibody
4. Specific antibody compared_with Specific antibody
Subject
Specific antibody
Predicate
compared_with
Object
Specific antibody
5. Placental expression USES FCGR3A gene|FCGR3A
Subject
Placental expression
Predicate
USES
Object
FCGR3A gene|FCGR3A
6. Immune response PROCESS_OF Infan
Subject
Immune response
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Infan
7. Severe disease PROCESS_OF Pregnant Women
Subject
Severe disease
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Pregnant Women
8. Placenta LOCATION_OF Specific antibody
Subject
Placenta
Predicate
LOCATION_OF
Object
Specific antibody
9. Plasma LOCATION_OF Specific antibody
Subject
Plasma
Predicate
LOCATION_OF
Object
Specific antibody
10. Specific antibody compared_with Specific antibody
Subject
Specific antibody
Predicate
compared_with
Object
Specific antibody
11. Placental expression USES FCGR3A gene|FCGR3A
Subject
Placental expression
Predicate
USES
Object
FCGR3A gene|FCGR3A
12. Immune response PROCESS_OF Infant, Newborn
Subject
Immune response
Predicate
PROCESS_OF
Object
Infant, Newborn
ABSTRACT
SARS-CoV-2 infection causes more severe disease in pregnant women compared to age-matched non-pregnant women. Whether maternal infection causes changes in the transfer of immunity to infants remains unclear. Maternal infections have previously been associated with compromised placental antibody transfer, but the mechanism underlying this compromised transfer is not established. Here, we used systems serology to characterize the Fc profile of influenza-, pertussis-, and SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies transferred across the placenta. Influenza- and pertussis-specific antibodies were actively transferred. However, SARS-CoV-2-specific antibody transfer was significantly reduced compared to influenza- and pertussis-specific antibodies, and cord titers and functional activity were lower than in maternal plasma. This effect was only observed in third-trimester infection. SARS-CoV-2-specific transfer was linked to altered SARS-CoV-2-antibody glycosylation profiles and was partially rescued by infection-induced increases in IgG and increased FCGR3A placental expression. These results point to unexpected compensatory mechanisms to boost immunity in neonates, providing insights for maternal vaccine design.
Subject(s)
Keywords

Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Placenta / Pregnancy Complications, Infectious / Immunoglobulin G / SARS-CoV-2 / COVID-19 / Maternal-Fetal Exchange / Antibodies, Viral Topics: Vaccines Limits: Adult / Female / Humans / Infant, Newborn / Pregnancy Language: English Journal: Cell Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: J.CELL.2020.12.027

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Full text: Available Collection: International databases Database: MEDLINE Main subject: Placenta / Pregnancy Complications, Infectious / Immunoglobulin G / SARS-CoV-2 / COVID-19 / Maternal-Fetal Exchange / Antibodies, Viral Topics: Vaccines Limits: Adult / Female / Humans / Infant, Newborn / Pregnancy Language: English Journal: Cell Year: 2021 Document Type: Article Affiliation country: J.CELL.2020.12.027